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MKS

Forum Activity by MKS

I really liked Matthew Rhys in it.

That's about all the good I have to say. I watched 3 or 4 seasons before I couldn't justify wasting any more time.
Sep 18, 2017 10:56 PM
RockI'll probably be popping in my copy of Hard Boiled over the next few days.

I grabbed all the Yakuza Papers movies at the video store, so I'll also be getting to those over the next week.

The original five or all eight? I own them all but have only watched the first. It's classic Fukasaku so I just need to find time for the binge.
Sep 16, 2017 6:21 AM
Rock
MKS
RockI got to see Manhunt, John Woo's latest, at TIFF and it's a fucking blast. On one hand, Woo seems to be parodying his trademark Woo-isms (helped in large part by Masaharu Fukuyama's magnificent deadpanning) but on the other hand he's aware of how goddamn awesome they are and shamelessly indulges in them to thrilling effect. The opening scene is a teahouse shootout and not long after Woo brings out the doves. Because of that self-referential quality, I don't know how it'll play to people not already in the cult of Woo, but fans should be in for a treat. Also, while Woo's vision of masculinity has never been toxic (at least, not compared to his contemporaries), I did like that he had stronger female characters in this one, although I don't know if the shot of the sexy female assassin taking off her helmet during an action scene to wave her hair was secretly the endgame or just an opportune Woo-ism. (In his defense, her hair was pretty nice.)

I'm so dang jealous. I've been trying to watch the original before I get my Woo on but that would change if given the opportunity. Sounds great!

The original seems to be hard to get a hold of, based on the minute of half-assed googling I just did. Woo (in the pre-recorded message that played before the movie; he wasn't there for my showing) said that he did his version as a tribute to Ken Takakura, but the movie plays like a tribute to his own '80s movies. You'll probably find a few things to quibble with, but I can't see not digging it a lot.

I also popped in my copy of The Killer again, and I think it's still my favourite Woo. Some of the melodrama is a bit much and Hard Boiled has more ambitiously staged action, but I don't think he's made as lovely use of colour elsewhere.

I'm hoping Arrow releases a Takakura set. Or Eclipse.?
Hard Boiled foreva
Sep 16, 2017 5:15 AM
BadLieutenant
last splashSo now we're getting parody threads.

This is unheard of in this forum's history.

Wha?!?!!?
Sep 16, 2017 5:13 AM
The man leaves behind the legacy of possibly being the greatest character actor of all time from the longest time. Not a bad run. I'll miss him.
Sep 15, 2017 10:37 PM
StuI finally just?watched Wake Up, and technical roughness aside, thought it was a nifty lil' Horror short, MKS; would you have any issue if I shared it on one of the other forums that spun off from RT, per chance?

No issue at all. Would be very much appreciated!
Sep 15, 2017 10:00 PM
Popcorn Reviews
BadLieutenant
Popcorn ReviewsMaybe he's Ben Organa.

OK, that's a bit too much.

I wasn't being serious.

Whaaaaaa?!?!?
Sep 15, 2017 9:51 PM
RockI got to see Manhunt, John Woo's latest, at TIFF and it's a fucking blast. On one hand, Woo seems to be parodying his trademark Woo-isms (helped in large part by Masaharu Fukuyama's magnificent deadpanning) but on the other hand he's aware of how goddamn awesome they are and shamelessly indulges in them to thrilling effect. The opening scene is a teahouse shootout and not long after Woo brings out the doves. Because of that self-referential quality, I don't know how it'll play to people not already in the cult of Woo, but fans should be in for a treat. Also, while Woo's vision of masculinity has never been toxic (at least, not compared to his contemporaries), I did like that he had stronger female characters in this one, although I don't know if the shot of the sexy female assassin taking off her helmet during an action scene to wave her hair was secretly the endgame or just an opportune Woo-ism. (In his defense, her hair was pretty nice.)

I'm so dang jealous. I've been trying to watch the original before I get my Woo on but that would change if given the opportunity. Sounds great!
Sep 15, 2017 9:48 PM
DeschainNot gonna lie after watching Rick and Morty Bojack just doesn't do much for me anymore. I'll still check out the new season though.

I think the shows are nearly opposites. Rick & Morty is high concept that dabbles in genuine drama and Bojack is deliriously depressing drama that dabbles in high concept. Overall, I prefer Bojack.
This season was nearly Lars Von Trier levels of punishing and the way it attacked the generational impact of abuse, mental illness and depression is astounding. The ending was wonderfully touching if a tad obvious.
Sep 12, 2017 11:53 PM
RockI haven't seen Black Belt Jones, but the theme by Dennis Coffey is pretty awesome.

That it does. Great soundtracks just seems to come with the territory. I'm more surprised when one doesn't sound jamming. Slaughter has a great theme song too.
I've gotta watch my copies of Cotton Comes to Harlem, Three the Hard Way, and Black Samson in addition to the westerns I mentioned. Familiar with any? I know nothing about Black Samson.
Sep 11, 2017 3:35 AM
last splashIf that's what the National usually sound like then I have to get more of their records. I describe this music as elegant and refined indie rock. It almost sounds like it could have come out of the late 80s indie rock scene. Immaculate.

Also listening to the new Motorhead covers record. They do David Bowie, Metallica and many more. It's different for them kinda. That usual cranking Lemmy voice with a more slowed down vibe.

The Boxer and High Violet are two of the greatest albums I've ever heard and Trouble Will Find Me and Alligator aren't too far behind. I'm not ready to put this newest beside them just yet but I've listened to the others dozens of times so I won't be surprised if I do soon.
Sep 11, 2017 3:32 AM
Sorcerer Supreme Nameless
last splashThis place gets really boring at night. Well I guess it's not night time for everyone. This is a big world. Right now I'm listening to Aphex Twin's last album and masterpiece SYRO. It's worth getting at any cost (from the internet if possible).?

That's been swimming around Youtube and I'm a fan of anything Aphex Twin. I tried getting into the new LCD Soundsystem today but am mostly on the lookout for that new The National album

It's great. All of their works are growers but my first full listen was quite nice. It's definitely a National album and I mean that as one of the highest compliments. They don't seem to experiment but rather refine.
Sep 11, 2017 2:41 AM
Watched a few blacksploitation flicks throughout the week.

Black Belt Jones: Robert Clouse's second best film after Enter the Dragon. It's still in the realm of so bad it's good like the vast majority of his work but Jim Kelly makes it very watchable. The movie tips into utter insanity towards the end with prolonged sequences, such as the chase/fight scene between Kelly and the love interest (who says things like "I'm gonna make you a sick faggot") so that he can bang her that results on them terrorizing every white person they pass, such as portly fella on the beach playing his guitar, which they take and smash arbitrarily. It's baffling but greatly entertaining.

Hot Potato: Boring sequel that tried to turn Jones into an Alan Quartermain type (predates Indiana Jones) and had the fatal flaw of a repulsive, fat, obnoxious sidekick that gets most of the dialogue and way too much focus for the action scenes.

Slaughter and Slaughter's Big Rip-Off- If these were combined, they would be among the absolute best in the genre. Slaughter is far better paced but it's pay off are not nearly as entertaining and cool as it's sequel. It's among the quality of Truck Turner or Friday Foster. Jim Brown is better as an every man than a James Bond type.

All around, good stuff. I've got copies of some blaxploitation spaghetti western cross over with Rio Conchos and Take the Hard Way. Excited about them.
Sep 10, 2017 9:29 PM
MadManThe Seventh Victim is the only Lewton I am not a fan of, but it needs a rewatch.

It's one of his slowest and that was hard to get past, but think in retrospect it does some really awesome things and it's presentation of satanists was fascinating.
Sep 10, 2017 9:13 PM
Robin McDonaldI agree with Ergil in referencing Room 237.
Anything with Lynch is going to be interpreted all sorts of ways. Some fascinating and credible sounding. Others way out there.
I don't think there is a logical answer or a map particularly for Twin Peaks the Return. In a movie there is only two hours of material
to sort through. With Returns there are 18 hours with a lot of filler material. ?It does not stick to its own rules. It dangles scores of threads which lead to nowhere. Foreshadow events and characters which never happen or turn out nothing like they were described. This show also uses a lot of doubles and evil twins and people maybe occupied by other people. People who might be from a shifted universe rather than who they appear to be. You spend a lot of time deciphering who is who. And its not clear anyone even Lynch could say.

The are no set rules of what you can and can't do but I think doubles tend to be a hallmark of bad or lazy writing unless you really have your eye on a prize. And I don't think that's always true with Return.

I haven't read the related books like "History of Twin Peaks" Laura Palmer's Journal or the new epilog book. I think FWWM is useful for watching returns.
It gave me something to think about when I thought Returns had a structure worth deciphering. As it got near the end it appeared to just break all the rules it pretended to set up. I think you will never be ready or get it because there is little to get. Lynch's films are about the journey rather than the destination for better or for worse.

I know you get this a lot, Cow, but you're wrong.
Sep 10, 2017 9:10 PM
It's not quite as good as the Beyond and I prefer House by the Cemetery despite thinking it's probably the weaker effort, but it and the trilogy as a whole exemplify one of the reasons I love Italian horror so much: It truly captures the feeling of a nightmare and irrational fear/phobia. There's something about these films that feel like childhood fear put to celluloid and like those fears, describing them aloud reveals how potentially silly and illogical it is. Luckily, film is next to pure empathy so that isn't a hindrance but a benefit.

If you haven't seen the other two in the trilogy, I highly recommend them.
Sep 5, 2017 7:28 AM
Robin McDonaldWeird or lack of continuity Dale and Diane enter a cheap one level motel and Dale leaves alone from a multi floor hotel of the same color.

You really think that wasn't wholly intentional?
Sep 4, 2017 11:15 PM
djerdapNow this was one of more memorable viewing experiences. The reactions to the ending are indeed very much reminiscent of The Sopranos.

By the time Part 17 was finishing, I was frankly mortified by some of the choices Lynch and Frost made. Some of the scenes (the dreadful glove vs. BOB bouncing ball for one) still make me cringe.

But then Part 18 turned some of those choices on its head and the whole thing made - thematic if not narrative - sense. There are some parallels to the original series finale here. The more I think about the ambiguous events in Part 18, the more I like how it ends.

Pretty much the entirety of Part 18 has this feeling that something with our hero's choices - which seemed so naive and well-intended in Part 17 - went very wrong. Even Cooper doesn't quite seem like himself there (he has more mannerisms akin to Evil Coop? - not to mention that Diane covers his face in that weird sex scene).

While he was lost in the Black Lodge in the original series finale, he seems lost now in the "real world" - a world that he somehow helped create but is not nearly what he had in mind. Consequences of trauma are still there (one cannot just go back and rekindle a romance with a woman the doppelganger raped) and they cannot be so easily dismissed. Cooper tried playing god... and ended up not even knowing what the time is.

The ideas presented are brilliant. It will take a rewatch to see whether the execution of those ideas is just as good. Curious to see how Part 17 will sit with me after that total mindfuck of a finale.


I agree about the first half of 17. The Lucy/Coop/Glove/Bob Ball/Face Watermark stuff had a distinct pang of the lull from season 2 and the cheesier effects of the original run that now feel more intentional due to the degree of cheesy effects this season despite improved technology. It's a degree of camp that I'm okay with in small doses but when it highlights a conflict built up over 17 hours and places emphasis on minor characters, it's a level of anticlimax that I have a hard time abiding.

But then ep 17 shifts focus back to Coop, bravely going where he should not go and asking not to be followed, and back to Laura. I almost would have felt okay with his attempt to save her ending the show because it implied that everything changed and that re-emphasis on the importance of Laura and how much fall out has occurred since her demise would make it fitting....

But Twin Peaks is a horror story about the unintended and unforeseen ramifications of actions. The bulk of the show is about what happens when someone kills Laura Palmer so shifting it to the horror of what happens when she's saved is more than fitting. I've been putting together the pieces of the finale to attempt a more cogent view. Here are some of the pieces I noticed and thoughts:

-Sarah (probably Judy) breaks the picture of Laura and time/reality becomes distorted and Laura disappears, not truly saved. This seems to be a creation of the new dimension.

-The Giant had sent a Laura orb to Earth previously. Was that old Laura or new Laura?

-Coop states that once they pass this point from following electricity, everything might change. After that, he is no longer "good Coop"

-Rather than a Red Room, he appears to entire a Lost Highway styled alternate dimension complete with that film's motel.

-Diane sees her double at the Hotel. When they have sex, the song from the Woodsman episode plays and she tries to hide his face and look away. Identity obscuring.

-He awakes in a different hotel, with a letter for "Richard." This has stylistic similarities to the various realities and personalities of Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway.

-"Richard" behaves, at various times, like good Coop, evil Coop and Dougie (at the end when he stumbles back into the street.

-At not Laura's house, there's a white horse statue on the mantle across from the dead body. The White Horse always only showed itself to Sarah and was unexplained. Given the many affiliations this new world has with Judy, I'm going to assume that it is Judy or an omen for Judy. This combined with not Laura working at "Judy's" and the return to a Lost Highway transit certainly implies that this isn't truly an alternate reality but an extension of the Lodge, possibly created by Judy.

-The folks at the house had the same name as the old lady spirit and grandson that Laura would give meals on wheels to. Had to look that one up because the names stuck out to me.

So basically, this ends cyclically like s2, as you pointed out. With Coop losing himself in a noble attempt to solve a mystery and Laura once again finds herself traumatized and victimized by the horrors or Twin Peaks. It's haunting, serious, and well conceived and escapes the silliness of floating ball Bob or cheesy effects. I loved this ending and while I hope this means that there will be more, I think the message of there never being conclusive resolution is resoundingly clear and would be fine with this.

But boy, do I want more.
Sep 4, 2017 5:56 PM
Between Trump's bungling of Harvey and announcing the end of DACA, his politics are starting to feel like very personal attacks on my friends and family.

I hope Mueller can save us but it feels like too much to hope for.
Sep 4, 2017 3:57 AM