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MKS

Forum Activity by MKS

If this is the Drafthouse showing, it's a fundraiser for the Women's League of Voters. Non-issue.
May 25, 2017 11:39 PM
Black PhilipDid you watch The Age of Shadows yet, MKS? Oh yeah and June 28th...OKJA! Getting pretty enthusiastic reviews from Cannes.

Bought it but have not watched it. Saving it for my break.
May 25, 2017 11:56 AM
Takoma1
MKSTak, have you seen the Night Train Murders? It made LHOTL complete worthless to me. It's far and away the better exploitation adaptation of Virgin Spring and unlike LHOTL, it doesn't seem to be a cruel movie as Aldo Lado works in his omnipresent commentary of classism that adds necessary dimension and purpose.

I watched about 20 minutes, got uncomfortable, decided "I don't need to see this right now!", and stopped watching. It's one I may return to later, but exploitation is something I'm mostly over.

While it's exploitative, it's certainly in the more polished Italian giallo spectrum than the Grindhouse of LHOTL. I don't blame you for the discomfort but I can assure you that it's never nearly as graphic or gratuitous as LTHOTL.
But everything in the blue tinted cabin is haunting.
Interestingly, Lado claims to have never seen Craven's film. It seems like bullshit to me but it could be both decided to do an adaptation of Virgin Spring...
May 25, 2017 4:39 AM
Janson Jinnistan
MKSJJ... You love Cruise in Magnolia, right??? RIGHT?!?!

It helps to know a little about Tom's similarly poor relationship with his real father. ?I think that it's a very personal performance in a lot of ways, almost meta.

Indeed. Cruise plays with affectations of confidence and masculinity so well then lays bare the reality of the character in a way that's shockingly raw. It's a unique performance by him for exactly that reason. Many of his roles deal with a character's artifice but rarely does he tear down that barrier. Eyes Wide Shut, Collateral, Mission Impossible, Top Gun and even Risky Business all show the ruse but don't pull back the curtain.
If there's a performance that stands alongside Magnolia, I haven't seen it and I consider myself a big fan.
May 25, 2017 4:30 AM
RockI watched Close Range, a DTV flick with Scott Adkins from the director of Ninja and Ninja: Shadow of a Tear. It's not as good as either of those movies, mostly because it puts more emphasis on plot and character, and there's a reason most of these actors are only in DTV stuff. (There's one actor who tries to do a squinty-eyed Charles Napier impression, and let me tell you, he's no Charles Napier.) There are more gunfights than the other films, and they're pretty forgettable, but the fights are pretty solid and Adkins doesn't embarrass himself when called to act. There are worse ways to kill an hour and a half, but this shouldn't be a priority for anybody.

You pretty much described my experience with Hard Target 2.
I don't know why Adkins wasn't touched for Iron Fist. He's a better actor and FAR better martial artist than current Rand. Given the character is supposed to be the greatest martial artist, it would be preferable that he looked like one and not like a chump.
May 25, 2017 4:19 AM
Matthew Good... BandJust so I'm clear: Does everyone hate Prometheus ONLY because of the idiotic characters? When I watched Prometheus in the theater I loved it, but only because I was dazzled by the insane visuals, art direction, atmosphere, sound, etc - basically, the technical aspects of the film. It was after going over the dumb moves the seemingly droolingly stupid characters make (petting the alien snake, running in a straight line from the falling ship, getting lost even though you made the map, etc.) that made the movie 'bad'. But, whenever I read something about Prometheus people sound like they were physically assaulted by the movie's very existence.

Do people actually hate Prometheus for anything beyond the dumb characters? I think if Prometheus had smartly written characters it would have been a classic. But, even as is, it's 'bad', but not, 'kill it with fire' bad, as people seem to imply.

Which leads us to Covenant: The characters are almost exactly as dumb. So, why aren't people losing their shit over this one? Covenant doesn't even have all of the amazing technical aspects of Prometheus, so how in the hell does it have a way higher tomato meter?

EDIT: What the hell? I could have sworn the Prometheus had a tomato meter rating in the 40s. But, it's in the 70s, just like Covenant. I guess now the question is: How does a movie that is seemingly universally hated have a 72 tomato meter rating? Have people simply talked themselves into an irrational hatred?

It's not just the insultingly stupid characters. It's the wholly broken plot, shallow themes that push ideas I find unappealing, and a general attitude that mistakes vagueness for profundity, when it seems to merely mask incompetence. Lindleof butchered Spaihts' admittedly mediocre script and turned it into a garbage fire.
It's just like the Star Wars prequels. Highly rated for technical prowess that time has not been kind to for being fundamentally unsound.
May 25, 2017 1:24 AM
Janson Jinnistan
crumbsroomAnd, just in case you think I forgot about Magnolia, I didn't. Love the movie, but Tom Cruise is my least favorite part of it.

If only he had drop-kicked those fucking dogs.

JJ... You love Cruise in Magnolia, right??? RIGHT?!?!
May 24, 2017 4:07 AM
Tak, have you seen the Night Train Murders? It made LHOTL complete worthless to me. It's far and away the better exploitation adaptation of Virgin Spring and unlike LHOTL, it doesn't seem to be a cruel movie as Aldo Lado works in his omnipresent commentary of classism that adds necessary dimension and purpose.
May 24, 2017 4:05 AM
BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenant
MKSSame. Did you also feel the hobo in the jail cell was meant to evoke the man from Mulholland Drive?

Somewhat, though its stark blackness reminded me more immediately of The Grandmother's drained color palette. The Man From Another Place's new form also seemed like something out of Lynch's early DIY days.

Narratively, I'm thinking the jail cell spirit somehow leads Evil Cooper to killing the wife.



MKSI think there's very strong connective tissue between MD and this revival. It may be a greatest hits, as you put it, but I can't shake the feeling that it's more the Dark Tower to his oeuvre.

It may be just be that this interview with Sherilyn Fenn from a couple years ago, in which she explained how the germ of Mulholland Dr.'s concept came from the idea of an Audrey Horne spinoff, could have planted a seed in my head that there's an especially strong connection between Twin Peaks and Mulholland Dr.

That's what made me start viewing them as strongly connected. There's another interview where David Lynch said that LH was in the same universe as TP (I need to find it) and the reappearance of Rita in IE just has me looking for all sorts of connections. The Arm's new form definitely feels like something from his shorts or Eraserhead.
Also, Ep 3 is utterly hysterical in that awkward, mind melty way only Twin Peaks can be. It's back in full force!


I know there are some factions of Twin Peaks fans who found the first two episodes lacking in the lighthearted quirkiness they enjoyed from the original run, but the third episode is really when it brings that spirit back in full bloom. If anything, I think the fourth episode goes too aggressive in that direction (the less said about a certain celebrity cameo the better), but at least it moves the plot along for the most part. But I am enjoying everything about disoriented Cooper. I probably expected a rawer treatment of PTSD from his experience in the Black Lodge, but this version completely works in the Twin Peaks style without feeling like an emotional cop-out.

Hopefully I'll get to watch ep 4 tomorrow. Had some grading to do that killed my plan to get through both today. I think swinging to far in either direction is a very Twin Peaks thing to do.
May 24, 2017 4:02 AM
Janson Jinnistan
Matt Wayt
Janson JinnistanIt's predictable and contrived, like the rest of the plot.

K. But again, you should be able to "predict" it. Because he tells you what's going on.

Great. ?Not really the point I was making.

You see, once we "predict" David, then we're resigned to the inevitable conclusion, and this evaporates any concern or interest in the fates of the heroes during the final two climatic action set-pieces. ?This turns these scenes into empty mechanical gestures, as we already know that the outcome is all for naught. ?I guess that's less of a problem for those who are rooting for David, but for the rest of us, it tends to highlight just how disposable these characters, that we presumably have supposed to care about over the last two hours, really are.

I think it works better recognizing that it's David as it becomes his great experiment. He's pitting his creation against the crew to see if he's succeeded. He does everything to put them in the same space together and gets to watch how it plays out. It's a different dynamic than survival vs. death and perhaps it's not gratifying for some, but I find the success vs. failure of David's entire reason for being enough to have stake in it. My problem was the tone deaf constant attack of the Alien resulting in, aside from a few initial shots, something that wasn't particularly tense in a visceral way.
May 24, 2017 4:01 AM
BadLieutenant
MKSSame. Did you also feel the hobo in the jail cell was meant to evoke the man from Mulholland Drive?

Somewhat, though its stark blackness reminded me more immediately of The Grandmother's drained color palette. The Man From Another Place's new form also seemed like something out of Lynch's early DIY days.

Narratively, I'm thinking the jail cell spirit somehow leads Evil Cooper to killing the wife.


MKSI think there's very strong connective tissue between MD and this revival. It may be a greatest hits, as you put it, but I can't shake the feeling that it's more the Dark Tower to his oeuvre.

It may be just be that this interview with Sherilyn Fenn from a couple years ago, in which she explained how the germ of Mulholland Dr.'s concept came from the idea of an Audrey Horne spinoff, could have planted a seed in my head that there's an especially strong connection between Twin Peaks and Mulholland Dr.

That's what made me start viewing them as strongly connected. There's another interview where David Lynch said that LH was in the same universe as TP (I need to find it) and the reappearance of Rita in IE just has me looking for all sorts of connections. The Arm's new form definitely feels like something from his shorts or Eraserhead.
Also, Ep 3 is utterly hysterical in that awkward, mind melty way only Twin Peaks can be. It's back in full force!
May 24, 2017 1:55 AM
BadLieutenant
MKSSame. Did you also feel the hobo in the jail cell was meant to evoke the man from Mulholland Drive?

Somewhat, though its stark blackness reminded me more immediately of The Grandmother's drained color palette. The Man From Another Place's new form also seemed like something out of Lynch's early DIY days.

Narratively, I'm thinking the jail cell spirit somehow leads Evil Cooper to killing the wife.


MKSI think there's very strong connective tissue between MD and this revival. It may be a greatest hits, as you put it, but I can't shake the feeling that it's more the Dark Tower to his oeuvre.

It may be just be that this interview with Sherilyn Fenn from a couple years ago, in which she explained how the germ of Mulholland Dr.'s concept came from the idea of an Audrey Horne spinoff, could have planted a seed in my head that there's an especially strong connection between Twin Peaks and Mulholland Dr.

That's what made me start viewing them as strongly connected. There's another interview where David Lynch said that LH was in the same universe as TP (I need to find it) and the reappearance of Rita in IE just has me looking for all sorts of connections. The Arm's new form definitely feels like something from his shorts or Eraserhead.
Also, Ep 3 is utterly hysterical in that awkward, mind melty way only Twin Peaks can be. It's back in full force!
May 24, 2017 1:55 AM
RockIt's not good. I understand what it's trying to do with the wildly veering tone (showing how this horrific violence is tearing away at innocence and whatnot - I read something where Craven cited how the violence from the Vietnam War was coming into people's living rooms through the news, and his approach makes more sense in that context), but it's not competent enough to pull it off, and given the rape content it comes across even worse. The kazoo music does not help matters. That being said, David Hess's performance is very good and I think the key scene is appropriately disturbing. The same premise is done much better in The Virgin Spring and The Night Train Murders, both of which are quite a bit more tactful without sugarcoating the premise.

The Hills Have Eyes is quite a bit better. It also has its rough edges, but it's in far greater control of its tone. It's also pretty dark, but not quite as tough to get through as Last House.

Well, now I don't need to make a post. Hmph.
May 23, 2017 9:26 PM
RockAm I a bad person for finding King Boxer aka Five Fingers of Death pretty underwhelming? It's not bad (Shaw Brothers productions tend to have a pretty firm baseline of minimum quality/competence), but it's dragged down by a pretty uninteresting story that it invests far too much in. Lieh Lo is wasted as a pretty bland hero (he's much more fun when he's playing villains) and the main fighting style is pretty boring choreography-wise, although there are at least two standout action sequences (the blind fight and the final fight) and some choice gore moments. This material could have been exceptional in the hands of Chang Cheh, who knew how to imbue stakes into really basic premises, punch them up with blood and gore, and execute them nimbly and energetically.

Also, yes.
May 23, 2017 4:46 AM
Janson Jinnistan
MKSI'd welcome recommendations of anything "Lynchian" at the moment as well.

The Reflecting Skin is an interesting quasi-horror film that gets frequent comparisons to Lynch, when it's mentioned at all.

Nadja certainly shares his sense of humor.

The Tenant, if you haven't seen it, is a bizarre enough rabbit-hole to either fall in or trip over.

I've never head of TRS. I've had my eye on Nadja for about a year when my friend brought it to my attention. I thought it was more of a classy Vampire flick though.
I need to see the Tenant but I keep holding off due to hope that criterion will release it as they did with the rest of the apartment trilogy. I've had a bad go of getting inferior copies and someone like Arrow, Scream factory or Criterion announcing a far better edition so I'm especially hesitant. You've put me back on the path though.
Has anyone seen Surveillance by Lynch's daughter? It's terrible but Pullman gives his best Cage impression.
May 23, 2017 4:01 AM
crumbsroomI really like Collateral, and even considering my general and long standing dislike of Tom Cruise, it's one of the few movies I think he puts forward a good performance in. And as a villain no less.

But... He's the Cruise.
May 23, 2017 3:55 AM
I love Collateral. I think in many ways, it's arguable that the shootout in the nightclub and alleyway shooting are just as good, if not better, than the tremendous shootout of Heat.

Cruise is absolutely compelling and his feeling of artificial control is put to the best use since Magnolia.
May 23, 2017 3:46 AM
StuI haven't seen Covenant yet (and may never), but I'm not surprised to see the divided reviews so far, as I just don't think the Alien franchise has ever had that much potential for a lot of good sequelization, to be honest. A lot of the appeal of the original was how simple and straightforward the Xenomorph was in its pure hostility, and how tantilizingly creepy and mysterious its origins with the Space Jockey & the derelict ship were. Cameron kept things temporarily fresh by making the series out-and-out action, but every entry since then has either just repeated what we've seen before, or continued to muddy the waters of the Xenomorph mythology with more silly, confusing B.S. Even if we were still seeing better Alien sequels that do a better job on expanding on the origins of the creatures themselves, that would still take away some of the mystery they held previously, so you're kind of screwed either way, ya know?

Why would you never see it?
May 23, 2017 3:00 AM
BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenantAfter the first two hours, I'm all-in. So far, this is exactly what I hoped it would be: We check in with characters from the original series but Lynch is free to follow his muse wherever it leads him. The first episode's scene with the apparition in the glass box is just about as frightening as anything Lynch has ever conjured. It's very "the man behind Winkie's" in its setup, which leads me to ask: Does anyone else suspect that there are a number of plot points in this series that Lynch revived from whatever he planned the Mulholland Dr. TV series to be? The bloated corpse in the bed and the investigation by deadpan detectives seemed to point specifically back to that earlier work. But I'm also open to the notion that Lynch has planned this as a career-spanning magnum opus.

Considering the homeless man in the cell looked suspiciously like the man behind Winkies. I've been banking on this series being what officially and over to brings his post Twin Peaks surreal features under the same umbrella.
Do you know of any potential plots that were conceived for the MD show? I was hoping the Criterion release would have the pilot and bunch of this info but it doesn't appear to. Disappointing given how packed the Eraserhead set is.


I don't know of any plot points that were conceieved for the MD TV show without making it into the movie; I was just speculating based on how similar certain elements that showed up in Mulholland Dr. are to what we've seen so far in the Twin Peaks revival. But this may be in keeping with Lynch giving us a greatest hits catalogue of his work. The opening black-and-white sequence does point to Eraserhead, while the flat establishing shots of the police station harken back to Blue Velvet.

Same. Did you also feel the hobo in the jail cell was meant to evoke the man from Mulholland Drive?
I think there's very strong connective tissue between MD and this revival. It may be a greatest hits, as you put it, but I can't shake the feeling that it's more the Dark Tower to his oeuvre.
May 23, 2017 2:56 AM
BadLieutenantAfter the first two hours, I'm all-in. So far, this is exactly what I hoped it would be: We check in with characters from the original series but Lynch is free to follow his muse wherever it leads him. The first episode's scene with the apparition in the glass box is just about as frightening as anything Lynch has ever conjured. It's very "the man behind Winkie's" in its setup, which leads me to ask: Does anyone else suspect that there are a number of plot points in this series that Lynch revived from whatever he planned the Mulholland Dr. TV series to be? The bloated corpse in the bed and the investigation by deadpan detectives seemed to point specifically back to that earlier work. But I'm also open to the notion that Lynch has planned this as a career-spanning magnum opus.

Considering the homeless man in the cell looked suspiciously like the man behind Winkies. I've been banking on this series being what officially and over to brings his post Twin Peaks surreal features under the same umbrella.
Do you know of any potential plots that were conceived for the MD show? I was hoping the Criterion release would have the pilot and bunch of this info but it doesn't appear to. Disappointing given how packed the Eraserhead set is.
May 23, 2017 2:36 AM