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Forum Activity by Apex Predator

Congrats on another year, DaMU. Hoping one day to see your work on screen...
Apr 28, 2017 4:06 AM
1. Now that he's had a couple of good/decent films again, can we remember that his last name is Shyamalan and not some awful made up one?

2. Glass is one of the more interesting characters in Unbreakable and I do want to see more on him. Not so sure about whole film, but maybe it will work...

3. Can we have a guarantee that Bruce Willis is going to at least try to act in this one? We've been burned by him more often than not of late.
Apr 28, 2017 4:02 AM
Alright, I've finally seen Mommy.

Last time I struggled with a film for so long, I really ended up liking it (We Are the Best). Would this film have the same fate?

Not quite. But at least it ended well.

As the film opens, Diane (Anne Dorval) picks up her son Steve (Antoine-Olivier Pilon) from an institution. Both mother and son are flawed but love each other much. When a necklace that Steve gives his mom leads to her suspecting she stole it, violent events happen.

Fortunately into their lives comes neighbor Kyla (Suzanne Clement). She's a former teacher who lives with a husband and daughter, but due to a stuttering problem finds herself stuck at home. She becomes a confidant to Diane and teacher to Steve who slowly starts to respect her.

But due to a fire he started at the institution, Diane finds herself under legal threat of a lawsuit for injuries sustained. And although they try to form a flawed family of sorts, Steve might need more help than either one would be able to give him.

Do they consider sending him to another institution, which is legal under Canadian law (at least in this film)? Or do they try to make it work no matter what?

The film is fairly well acted with some powerful moments, particularly towards the end. I did appreciate that all three of the main characters were flawed and their attempt to form a makeshift family reminded me in some ways of Million Dollar Baby (also, Ruth B's Peter Pan for similar reasons).

But I'd advise you to avoid any spoilers when it comes to the film. Even catching the opening crawl took a decent amount of suspense out of the film (I spoilered the basic part in the review).

As a director, Xavier Dolan had his moments. There's a beautiful sequence towards the end which gave an alternative account of how things might have gone. And he allows each of the three main characters to have at least one moment of impact.

But he's flawed. There are times he lets scenes play out too long, uses shots that don't make a lot of sense (even if he was trying to do something on artistic merit), and uses music at inappropriate times. But these are things where if he actually works on his craft, he'll pick up and become a better director. In some ways, i think he's a bit ahead of Harmony Korine right now.

Mommy wasn't great, but it was decent.

NEXT: Perhaps a mindless action comedy?
Apr 28, 2017 3:50 AM
RookThe problem with situations like this is that the diehards, even though faced with evidence that O'Reilly might be a scumbag, will just double-down in their devotion to him. He'll probably end up the better for it.

Same thing with Trump...no matter the ethical missteps he takes, his fans will mostly just double their devotion, in order to avoid appearing "wrong" or fighting the "obvious" liberal conspiracy against him.

Confirmation bias? It's true, to a point.
But ask Glenn Beck how much "better" his life has been since leaving Fox News.
Apr 28, 2017 3:17 AM
Planet Terror
Robin McDonaldI read today Scott Baio summed her life up as it you do drugs and alcohol you are going to die.

Chachi judges Joni

8/10
Apr 26, 2017 3:18 AM
Special Agent CooperThe Equalizer (2014)

Damn those evil white men terrorizing anyone who isn't white or doesn't have a penis. That's okay, Denzel is on the case, killin' all the evil honkies. Including, apparently, brutally murdering a white male robber with a hammer because he stole a poor hispanic woman's wedding ring. But no, he's the good guy. The movie treats it like a superhero origin story

I had to watch a few episodes from the original TV show just to wash the bad taste out

So as the fan of the original series, you're saying to avoid?

Somehow a series that tries to avoid violence features weapons from a home improvement store? Do they at least avoid guns up until the end?
Apr 26, 2017 3:17 AM
Planet Terror
Special Agent Cooper
Planet Terror
Surely, our president and his supporters will be moved by the subtlety and sublimity of the films mentioned in this thread.

The dialogue is getting dumber all-around, no doubt. It just happens that the Hollywood machine tilts towards the left.

The only prominent right-leaning films are about super-patriot-snipers and the trickle of Godsploitation films that go direct to video #Godisstillnotdeadforreal.?

?

Godsploitation movies crack me up

I find them fascinating. They're so earnest and so terrible at the same time. Religious conservatives need artistically inclined liberal friends, because they're amazingly bad at making movies.


Probably because the message is points A-D and they start worrying about plot, characters and dialogue with point E?
Apr 26, 2017 3:15 AM
To the shock of absolutely no one, of course it's a Republican that founded TheRedPill. And bonus points for it turning out he's a son of a preacher as well.
Apr 26, 2017 3:12 AM
Apex Predator
Takoma1In the long term, this isn't really much of a victory.

O'Reilly signed his renewed contract with Fox right before they fired him, so he gets a HUGE payout for them terminating the contract.

Consider that the $13 million he paid out to his accusers over the years only added up to a fraction?of his earnings.

He can now set up quite happily with podcasts or as a contributor to any number of conservative outlets. Remember: he has been accused, but not found guilty in a court of anything. So for his fan base this is just an example of lying, oversensitive women trying to take a man down a notch. I'm sure that his book sales and speaking engagements and all his other accessory activities will continue to prove just as popular if not more.

The only real takeaway for me is that corporate culture will allow boorish, damaging, abusive behavior to continue until it becomes a financial inconvenience.

It's something, though.

I think it's going to take a while for sexual harassment in the workplace to be eliminated. A look at the big picture indicates that it's a small blow, but it's a decisive one.

Keep in mind that there was nothing that prevented Fox News from cancelling The O'Reilly Factor. Ratings were still strong as it appeared that the Trump year(s) wasn't going to affect that show.

But when one woman finally stood up for him, one who hadn't been bought off, protesters decided to attack Bill the best way they knew how...financially. If they could make it cost-prohibitive to continue to air The Factor, then Fox News would have to do something.

They did. It worked. Fox News very slowly, but finally reacted.

In a bit of sea change, I suspect that this is merely the beginning as Fox News will attempt to clean house in order to prevent allegations from running their network aground.

But we do have a long way to go. Especially since we have the Sexual Harasser in Chief sitting in the White House.

As for Bill (apparently related distantly to Bill Maher, shockingly), I suspect he'll end up going the path of Glenn Beck and Ann Coulter on the way to obsolescence.

Or if the O'Reilly podcast is any indication, perhaps he'll eventually turn whistleblower on Fox News? ?Something tells me that a) we'll eventually find out some revelations from Bill itself (if those things on Inside Edition are any indication, I think he won't play nice) and b) the line that people won't be surprised, but they'll be shaken indicates that we definitely haven't heard the last of this incident or other allegations (perhaps Hannity or other anchors are involved somehow?).
Apr 26, 2017 3:10 AM
Matt Norcross
Apex Predator
As for Bill (apparently related distantly to Bill Maher, shockingly), I suspect he'll end up going the path of Glenn Beck and Ann Coulter on the way to obsolescence.

Bill O'Reilly's distantly related to Bill Maher? Interesting...I might need to look more into that.

Found this out thanks to an Irish themed episode of Finding Your Roots (the episode also features Soledad O'Brien, who isn't related to either one).
Apr 26, 2017 3:04 AM
Will finish Mommy tonight/tomorrow, I swear! Don't hate on me, please.

So, There Goes My Baby:

I've seen the Videohound give this one 2 and a half bones and Leonard Maltin give this 3 stars.

Did they see the same film I did? Doubt it.

Anyway, a group of 8 students is considered the "Future of the Country" thanks to a Look front cover and article in 1962.

Three years later, the 8 get ready to graduate high school.

There's Stick (Rick, don't call him Ricky, Schroeder), a dude who is heavily into surfing and who has signed up to join Vietnam.
There's Pirate (Dermot Mulroney), so called for a patch he wore during a sock hop performance in 1962, who dreams of traveling the USA.
There's Sunshine (Kelli Williams), a hippie chick who also happens to be Patch's girlfriend. She dreams of going to love ins at San Francisco.
There's Finnegan (Noah Wyle), the school newspaper editor who wants to go off to school to become a poet.
There's Tracy (Kristin Minter), Finnegan's girlfriend who just wants love, whether it's with Finnegan or someone else.
There's Babette (Jill Schoelen), a girl who aspires to be a musical star.
There's Calvin (Kenny Ransom), the only black guy in the school, who dreams of a promising future while worrying about relatives at Watts.
And there's Mary Beth (Lucy Deakins), the class valedictorian who wants to attend Berkeley even though her parents want her to attend UCLA.

Over the course of two nights, the 8 will deal with the Watts riots and a Vietnam protester (Shon Greenblatt), who is friends of two of the eight and who is given the business by their school's conservative principal (Fred Coffin).

There's plenty of music which was nice to hear. And there's some tense moments as Calvin and Finnegan make their way in Watts to check up on Calvin's grandmother.

But in their quest to put in enough music to cause the Time/Life 1960s collection to have envy, they left out fleshing out the characters.

As a result, the dramatic intent of the film is left hanging. As does some of the interesting subplots (some resentment in Watts of Calvin making good, for example).

There manages to be the occasional moment such as the riots and Stick's speech upon learning of the protester's fate in jail.

But it works better as a time capsule of the early-mid 1960s than as a solid drama.

A film like this should've challenged the characters more, perhaps even placing some of them into conflict in the course of the film. But it plays like a slate of oldies on an easy listening AM station.

Plus, there's the not so subtle metaphor of their hangout Pop's slated for destruction in two days so that a mall can take its place.

Overall, it's an OK time-waster. But it could have, should have been more.
Apr 26, 2017 2:58 AM
Popcorn ReviewsWhat are your thoughts on some of Kubrick's other films? I'm curious.

Anyways, I loved Dr. Strangelove. It's one of my favorite comedies of all time. As for the tone clashes, I don't really see an issue. During the scene when the airplane was flying close to its target, I found that scene more humorous than serious, because I knew that if they were able to reach their target, they'd bring about the end of the world. The crew's 'heroism' in that scene seemed ironic. I also found it ironic how Kong's heroic sacrifice brought about the end of the world. I feel like the film was able to make humor out of its suspenseful moments.

Also, I recommend Kubrick's The Killing if you haven't seen it yet. I feel like it's one of Kubrick's more under seen films.

As for Beauty and the Beast, I enjoyed it quite a bit. By the way, what were your thoughts on the recent adaptation of the film? I wasn't that big on it, but maybe you liked it better than I did.

Stanley Kubrick's films have generally left me chilled.

A brief rating of the ones I've seen:

Great:
A Clockwork Orange

Good:
Dr. Strangelove
The Shining (maybe King hates it, but I thought Kubrick did pretty good with it. Even though his treatment of Shelly Duvall was uncalled for)

Okayish:
Full Metal Jacket (loses steam once it hits the battlefield)

Bad:
Eyes Wide Shut

Rewatch-worthy:
2001: A Space Odyssey (didn't care for it the first time; only the Hal sequence really stood out for me)

Seen parts:
Spartacus (Can't really review it, though)

As for the Beauty and the Beast remake, haven't seen it yet. And odds are good I won't see it for a while. It looks well enough, but I don't think I cared for the hype about the "gay" character (odds are it's much ado about very little).
Apr 26, 2017 2:33 AM
Takoma1
Apex PredatorAccidental Courtesy: Daryl Davis, Race, and America:

I've met Daryl Davis (when he came to speak at my school back in the 90s) and he's a very interesting guy. I hadn't realized there was a documentary about him. There is certainly a KKK presence in Maryland (where I grew up), even in the most liberal enclaves. Not sure the extent of its presence now, but one of my co-workers told a story about playing at a friend's house as a child and opening a closet door to find a full Klan robe and hood.
Davis takes an approach very much mired in empathy. I can understand why it's infuriating to some people, but I think that from an emotional, long-lasting point of view it is a very necessary element to have in any movement for widespread social change.

I find the story of small groups or individuals trying to make social change really interesting. There is another documentary called The Interrupters?that I found really powerful and moving.

Wow, I did not know that, Takoma.

Yeah, the documentary just came out in January and showed up in PBS about a month or so ago.

Found out about the KKK presence due to a small Baltimore online magazine that published several galleries including one dealing with Klansmembers marrying among other things. I suspect it's gotten smaller, but it's still there.

This is true about Davis's approach. The film does tackle whether it's necessarily the best approach during several conversations and I did appreciate the film willing to tackle that point of view.

I think it comes down to a comprehensive approach where one size does not fit all. This is apparent during the interview he has with the Southern Poverty Network guy where he explains to Davis what he does which is to criminalize the groups. It's clear that they're tackling things in different ways, but I think both approaches are valid.

The Interrupters? I'll keep my eye for it even though it appears to be not streaming anywhere at the moment. Maybe it'll show up on YouTube?

Unrelated, but there was a Frontline report on Solitary Confinement and how it affects people that I do need to finish.
Apr 26, 2017 2:28 AM
Leaping back in again. ?Tomorrow, will tackle There Goes My Baby, a 1965 set coming of age drama with Rick Schroeder, Noah Wyle, and Dermot Mulroney. ?Hopefully by then, will be done with Mommy as well.
Apr 25, 2017 4:36 AM
Planet Terror
MKS
The YETI
NathanielI feel like I've seen him shit on MKS more than anyone.

I remember when I though MKS was an idiot. I think it was the name and that I had him confused with someone else.

I'm baffled that I've changed anyone's mind.

I remember we had an exchange and you laid out good analysis in a toe-to-toe dialectical exchange and was very surprised that you were not what I thought you were.

Is it just me or is Death Proof kind of like Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino these days?

Get off my lawn!

Sorry, that was DP's line.
Apr 25, 2017 4:28 AM
Planet Terror
Black PhilipJanson doesn't earn my wrath on how much he posts. I can care less. He earns my wrath for being condescending every once in a while and I don't like that.?

Well, you're not wrong.

I get that.
Apr 25, 2017 4:28 AM
Takoma1In the long term, this isn't really much of a victory.

O'Reilly signed his renewed contract with Fox right before they fired him, so he gets a HUGE payout for them terminating the contract.

Consider that the $13 million he paid out to his accusers over the years only added up to a fraction?of his earnings.

He can now set up quite happily with podcasts or as a contributor to any number of conservative outlets. Remember: he has been accused, but not found guilty in a court of anything. So for his fan base this is just an example of lying, oversensitive women trying to take a man down a notch. I'm sure that his book sales and speaking engagements and all his other accessory activities will continue to prove just as popular if not more.

The only real takeaway for me is that corporate culture will allow boorish, damaging, abusive behavior to continue until it becomes a financial inconvenience.

It's something, though.

I think it's going to take a while for sexual harassment in the workplace to be eliminated. A look at the big picture indicates that it's a small blow, but it's a decisive one.

Keep in mind that there was nothing that prevented Fox News from cancelling The O'Reilly Factor. Ratings were still strong as it appeared that the Trump year(s) wasn't going to affect that show.

But when one woman finally stood up for him, one who hadn't been bought off, protesters decided to attack Bill the best way they knew how...financially. If they could make it cost-prohibitive to continue to air The Factor, then Fox News would have to do something.

They did. It worked. Fox News very slowly, but finally reacted.

In a bit of sea change, I suspect that this is merely the beginning as Fox News will attempt to clean house in order to prevent allegations from running their network aground.

But we do have a long way to go. Especially since we have the Sexual Harasser in Chief sitting in the White House.

As for Bill (apparently related distantly to Bill Maher, shockingly), I suspect he'll end up going the path of Glenn Beck and Ann Coulter on the way to obsolescence.
Apr 25, 2017 4:20 AM
Black Philip
MKS
Black Philip
MKSYou should edit out those spoilers. Spoilers have no expiration date.

Also, the definition of antihero is a protagonist that lacks heroic traits (i.e. is villainous). Sympathy need not apply.

I know what an anti-hero. I still don't see her as an anti-hero. she was devoid of any humanity at that point. She could have joined Hitler's Youth and no one would blink an eye.
And dude, did you know bruce willis is a ghost?

You obviously don't know what an antihero is.

I would consider Clint Eastwood in the man with no name movies an anti-hero. He didn't have classic heroic traits but he was someone you can still side with. I did not feel the same about this girl.

I think that would qualify as an anti-hero in my book.
Apr 21, 2017 4:49 AM
Black PhilipNice haul. I heard about that one guy that tries to change racists views. Sounds interesting. Don't watch too many docs these days though. I have the National Lampoon's documentary to watch this week though.

Did you finish Mommy? I saw Logan and it's the best movie I've seen this year. Will satisfy anyone's fix for drama and superhero films.

If you have Netflix, Accidental Courtesy is available there as well.

Nope, I'm at the part where he is at the store and just cut his wrist.

Good to know on Logan. Should I have seen the Wolverine spinoff films to appreciate this one, or can I get by by just seeing the X-Men ones?
Apr 21, 2017 4:45 AM
Accidental Courtesy: Daryl Davis, Race, and America:

I've seen two films from 2017 already! At this rate, I'll have 6 films done by December!

Oh wait, that's not that good. Suspect that I'll get more done by then. I had better!

Anyway, this is a documentary focusing on a musician named Davis who has an unusual pasttime...he meets with Ku Klux Klan members and tries to get them to give up their racist ways. In return, they give him their hood and cape.

As he says several times, "How can you hate me if you don't know me?"

Film is interesting when it focuses on the main topic in the film.?

It also manages to fascinate in times outside that, but it does wobble a bit when it focuses on the larger picture of race.?

Davis pointing out that many people walk over where Martin Luther King did his I Have a Dream Speech is a highlight. As is his conversation with a woman who asks him "How long is your documentary?" when he starts asking about how far we have to go on things.

As for the controversy, well, I think a little less of the Black Lives Matter movement after seeing their shameful behavior in Baltimore,?

It's one thing to question whether it is the best way to approach racism (he has a more productive similar conversation with someone from the Southern Poverty Law Center).

It's quite another to a) mock one guy's work by making fun of his lack of productivity (excuse me, he's trying to turn the hardest hearts here and THAT takes time), b) arguing that he has a fetish for KKK gear (ugh), and c) not even have the courtesy to sit down and have a conversation with someone who's attacking things from a different way (when the leader shows up refusing to shake his hand and bellowing a tantrum like a spoiled 3 year old, yeah, THAT reflects well on your movement).

But the leader does have a point: there are KKK members in Maryland (a Baltimore paper did a photographic essay on several of them).

Worst of the four films, and it's still fairly good.

Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Stopped Worrying and Loved the Bomb (I think that's the full title. If not, I think you know what film this is)

I think I have kinda given up on falling in love with any Stanley Kubrick film outside of A Clockwork Orange. I suspect that might have been his last chance.

There were some rather amusing moments, such as when Peter Sellers (as the British assistant of the crazy American sergeant) tries to convince an MP to shoot a Coca-Cola coin box. Or when Strangelove (Sellers) is talking and he can't put his hand down. Or when the American President (Sellers again) is trying to convince his Russian counterpart who is more sorry.

The plot? American sergeant in Alaska decides to call an audible and send his air force troops on a bombing run to Russia. But we learn that this might a) lead to a massive Russian counterattack and/or b) activate the Doomsday device that will kill us all.

Main issue here is tone clashes. At times, this film leans strongly towards the absurd (such as an ending conversation which still resonates). But it also wants to be taken seriously as we have some tense moments on the aircraft that's flying towards its target (led by Slim Pickens and featuring James Earl Jones).

It's good, but perhaps it could have been great.

Wonder if others think it plays as a horror at times especially now?

The Conjuring

At its surface, a familiar enough tale that might remind some of Poltergeist or The Exorcist.

But familiarity can work if the film contains craftsmanship at work with interesting characters, situations, and dialogue.

And for the most part, this film succeeds showing the versatility of one James Wan in the process.

The plot is that a trucker husband (Ron Livingston), his wife (Lili Taylor!), and five daughters move into a farmhouse. But when strange things start to happen, they learn too late of its history.

The wife seeks the help of a husband/wife team (Patrick Wilson/Vera Farmiga) who have experiences with ghosts and demons. He's performed exorcisms while she can see visions (but it can take something out of her).

They see trouble ahead and decide to give the house a thorough testing before seeking help from the Catholic Church.

The film concerns itself with the characters as much as it does the scares. And the scares here tend to be more organic in nature, not relying on jumping cats or bowling balls landing on a piano. They're also better spaced (not relying on waiting until the end for all the good stuff like some horrors *cough*Paranormal Activity*cough))

The climactic sequence didn't quite hold my attention the way the rest of the film did. It felt more old hat, more standard than the rest of the film.

But I do find myself looking forward to Part 2. I'm not so keen on the spinoff Dead Silence Annabelle.

Beauty and the Beast (1991):

I just had to see it for myself.

They've been playing it at work, but I didn't want to get some weird looks for being in the kid's area on my own time.

I was thinking as I saw bits and pieces that I couldn't believe that this was the first animated film nominated for best picture.

But as it turns out, I should have seen the whole thing beginning to end.

It's shamelessly sentimental. But it's flat-out great.

The plot: Young prince scoffs at old woman needing shelter, but it turns out that a young enchantress has tricked him revealing his lack of heart and turns him into a beast. If he finds true love before he turns 21 and the magical rose completely wilts, then he can convert back. If not, he'll stay the way he is and his household servants will stay various objects as well.

Enter Belle, a relatively modern princess more into books than the local conceited hunk Gaston. When her sickly inventor father ends up captured by the Beast, she sets out to find him.

A grand bargain is made and she becomes prisoner. But as she gets to truly know the Beast, she starts to melt that gruff exterior and he shows her kindness. Might love be in bloom? And what of Gaston who doesn't take no for an answer?

Great film (Be Our Guest is a particular standout) with good tunes and great visuals (I dug the settee dog!).?

For those wondering about whether I am ever going to do a video, I'm tempted to do one on a particular topic that this film has kind of inspired.

NEXT: Fine, I'll finish Mommy. I'm fairly close to the end and if I give it one final push, maybe I'll get there.


Other films yet to come:
Safe Haven
Ride Along
Neighbors
The Fits
Hot Pursuit
Last Summer
Judgement at Nuremberg
The Bad Kids
Ovarian Psyclos
Newtown
Seed: The Untold Story*
Love is a Many Splendored Thing*
Apr 20, 2017 4:49 AM