Club Silencio as a court of law

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In a separate thread, Lancespearman wrote the following, and I thought it deserved its own thread, so I'm pasting it again here:

(Context: the blue-haired lady's identity in question)


Let's start with her id. The blue haired lady sits in what looks like an owner's box at the theatre. She is at least a major patron or possibly an owner of the theatre and she utters a one word "judgement" 'Silencio' at the end of the movie.

Because she appears primarily in Diane's dream, I believe she is some aspect of Diane psyche. As she appears to sit in judgement of the Silencio proceedings, which I interpret to be a sort of court to determine the proper course Diane should engage in, she may be the "decider" for Diane.

She may also reflect Camilla 's interests because she is tasked with finding "justice" for Camilla. I find it difficult to see her as representing Camilla though because we really do not know very much about what kind of person Camilla really was.
Jan 20, 2007 10:40 PM
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Wow.

The Blue Haired Lady as a judge, the magician as a lawyer, the trumpetist as evidence that Diane's case is poor, the Emcee as the lawyer for the defense, pleading in favor of the "crying one in Los Angeles", Rebekah del Rio as evidence of her desperate love. The audience as the jury.


Let's do this step-by-step:

Rita's dream is her cry for justice: Silencio! Betty pleads for her lover to withdraw her claim ("it's okay!"), but Rita is adamant. She wants the case to be settled right away.

Entrance to the courtroom. Fate follows speedily the two protagonists as they enter, and waits at the door until judgment is pronounced. It is looming over both their destinies.

In the courtroom. The jury is all in place. Camera pans from the ceiling down to the stage; a sentence from above is about to occur.

The Accusation

[list]Muted trumpet. See the evidence? We can make up anything we like, conjure up a clarinet, a trumpet player, anything we like. Those are empty claims.Thunder and lightning. The Blue Haired Judge considers the case with severity. The judgment will certainly come, like blue thunder, to indicte the culprit. Betty gets frightened out of her wits. Rita looks at her in surprise, holds her to reassure her.[/list] The Defence
[list]The Crying One. Look how broken-hearted the poor girl is, she is still hopeful in spite of the wait, in spite of all the misunderstanding, she is crying over the indicter. Betty is crying. Even Rita herself is touched by the claim. Llorando.The judge does not seem to have considered the evidence (i.e. we didn't see her while defense was being presented, although we did see her when the accusation was taking place).[/list] The Blue Box. Rita's complaint (the key) finds its counterpart (the box). The two protagonists are now facing one another and readying for the sentence. Betty finds the box in her purse: the two understand that Betty is guilty as charged. All that remains is for Rita to execute the sentence, by opening the box. Betty has a pleading look, but Rita is determined to carry on.

1612 Heaven hurts. They hurry back to Ruth's apartment (Betty was hoping for ruth, for understanding, for she feels true remorse). Betty lays the box on the bedspread. She sees Rita is reaching for her own purse and will carry out justice, and understands that her destiny is faltering. She disappears, because it is Rita's decision, and Rita's decision alone, to read the judgment and execute it. Fate rushes into the box to carry out the sentence. We later come to know what the sentence is: Silencio!

Just as Diane receives the key that dooms Camilla in the real world (and also represent's Diane's claim against Camilla), Rita holds the key that dooms Betty in the mind world: Camilla dies at the hands of the hitman, Betty dies of her own madness, remorse and infatuation.

Silencio. Llorando. Two claims. Silencio has the last word.


Lancespearman, you've made my day!
Jan 20, 2007 10:47 PM
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The argument of Diane's counsel might be:

"Your Honor, it is not my client's fault that the dummy hit the wrong target! My client is not guilty!"

Since Joe killed the wrong person, Diane is not guilty of hiring him to do it. But then, connecting the chain of events, he would not have killed the wrong person without having been hired to kill Camilla, so Diane can be linked by the prosecution.

However, several things need consideration. First, Diane is culpable for knowing that Luigi planned a hit on Camilla and not warning her. I'm not a legal expert but I imagine that there are probably all sorts of legal avenues in the art of prosecution to assert this.

But ... Luigi's hit did not happen because the accident foiled plan. So is Luigi guilty? The accident would not have happened if the limo had not pulled over, so there we have a degree of involvement again, and therefore for Diane as well. If I were prosecution, I would certainly push for that charge.

(There may be a related case Castiglioni vs Messing for the murder of Mrs. Castiglioni, but that is outside the parameters of this story.)

Now let's cross examine Camilla. Is it her fault that she was killed, just because she teased Diane? Well! Diane would not have flipped out. So, similar to Diane's culpability for the murder of the blonde she did not order, Camilla is an essential link in the chain leading to her own death, and therefor also to that of Diane. Diane killed herself as Juliet did because of a mistaken view that the hit she ordered with Joe had been carried through. Diane would not have hired Joe if Roque's chain of command had not called her to tell her that the girl is missing. Another mistake: the police thought she was still alive because they did not know she had been resurrected. Now the quetion of resurrection enters the case! What is resurrection? Well with the aid of the internet we can now easily see that this has been argued by thousands of people for thousands of years. So let's just call it a police mistake. We can't blame the police; nobody's perfect.

So here we have these two dead people with all this resurrectional and reincarnational stuff to sort out.

Since Diane received the blue box at the appearance of the blue lady, and since we know that "Rita" had been there before (when she was alive as Camilla), that the blue lady had also given her the key prior to the planned hit and accident and had therefore been the avatar who intervened in the story by resurrecting her. That make her more than a judge in the sense that we humans think of it. She gave Camilla the key to reincarnation and resurrected her so that she could proceed toward that, and charged Betty with the mission of taking care of her until this mission was successfully carrried through.

I think the verdict is that the parties have shown remorse, compassion, and a sincere desire to right their wrongs and are therefor pardoned.

Case dismissed: Silencio!
Jan 20, 2007 11:21 PM
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spiff06Wow.

The Blue Haired Lady as a judge, the magician as a lawyer, the trumpetist as evidence that Diane's case is poor, the Emcee as the lawyer for the defense, pleading in favor of the "crying one in Los Angeles", Rebekah del Rio as evidence of her desperate love. The audience as the jury.
Someone in IMDb translated this as "the crier of the angels". It seemed to convey in English a little of the beauty I might feel from the Spanish if I knew it better.

[QUOTE]1612 Heaven hurts. They hurry back to Ruth's apartment (Betty was hoping for ruth, for understanding, for she feels true remorse). Betty lays the box on the bedspread. She sees Rita is reaching for her own purse and will carry out justice, and understands that her destiny is faltering. She disappears, because it is Rita's decision, and Rita's decision alone, to read the judgment and execute it.
...
Just as Diane receives the key that dooms Camilla in the real world (and also represent's Diane's claim against Camilla), Rita holds the key that dooms Betty in the mind world: Camilla dies at the hands of the hitman, Betty dies of her own madness, remorse and infatuation.[/QUOTE]I think the case is more compex than that (see above), but whether we or Diane like it or not, the remedy is owed to Camilla and the punishiment is owed to Diane. However, there is always a way out of a vicious circle, thus, we begin again: Silencio!

In every age I come back
To deliver the holy,
To destroy the sins of the sinner,
To establish righteosness.
Jan 20, 2007 11:38 PM
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Berny RabbitSomeone in IMDb translated this as "the crier of the angels". It seemed to convey in English a little of the beauty I might feel from the Spanish if I knew it better.
Indeed, yes. Read that somewhere here as well. I think the song still holds in the courtroom context regardless of the singer's introduction, and can be understood both ways, right? Her lyrics (see here) beautifully convey her pleading for Diane's case. Funny that I've always more or less seen her as a representation of Camilla (black and red); in the dream context, Diane might make a Camilla-like singer plead for her in Rita's eyes, which truly would highlight the depth of her remorse, and her yearning to be forgiven. Makes it very, very touching.

Berny RabbitI think the case is more complex than that (see above), but whether we or Diane like it or not, the remedy is owed to Camilla and the punishment is owed to Diane. However, there is always a way out of a vicious circle, thus, we begin again: Silencio!
Possibly. I have a reading that's more karma-oriented (or deterministic, if you will), than religion-oriented; it allows me to see it as a beautiful statement on human nature where moral considerations do not come in the way of the moods and feelings that pervade the movie.

This reading of Club Silencio (of course with the premise that it's happening in Diane's dream) sheds a new, and truly marvelous new light on the movie for me. I'm totally thrilled and know I'll have renewed relish for the Club Silencio scene when I watch it again.
Jan 21, 2007 12:37 AM
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spiff06Indeed, yes. Read that somewhere here as well. I think the song still holds in the courtroom context regardless of the singer's introduction, and can be understood both ways, right? Her lyrics (see here) beautifully convey her pleading for Diane's case. Funny that I've always more or less seen her as a representation of Camilla (black and red); in the dream context, Diane might make a Camilla-like singer plead for her in Rita's eyes, which truly would highlight the depth of her remorse, and her yearning to be forgiven. Makes it very, very touching.
Yes, it does. Very fitting. If we think of the singer as expressing what Diane wishes to express (her make up a reflection of Rita's), then it would seem that it becomes expressed in Spanish for Camilla, who is from points south. But the magician who reveals to (Canadian) Betty what is going on speaks to her in French. It was Rita who insisted on taking her there to show her something. So, when we see that both are hear dreaming of their lost lives, we see both parts of the story.
Jan 21, 2007 2:11 AM
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Berny RabbitI think the verdict is that the parties have shown remorse, compassion, and a sincere desire to right their wrongs and are therefore pardoned.

Case dismissed: Silencio!
I wish I could be as optimistic about the court's decision. For one thing, Diane hasn't forgiven herself. Then, the sentence is pronounced after we see the two figures in the spotlight, which, to me, signifies an end.

It won't come to you as a surprise that I see this as a court case happening inside Diane's mind as she's dreaming away trying to reconcile her innermost desires with harsh reality. Her subconscious tries to make a case for herself but isn't successful at it. As Betty, she tries to morph Rita into someone who resembles herself, but Rita's characters shines through too strongly for her to control her new, artificial creation. All she does spins out of control.

As for Camilla, never do we see her apologize. She apologizes as Rita for pretending to be someone she's not, thanks Betty for her help in trying to solve her identity puzzle, but that is all Diane's wishful dream. Her creation is as fragile and helpless as Gilda, but it's not Gilda, or Rita, Diane loves.

Diane then fantasizes about Camilla's appearance as a fantasmagoric creature visiting her in Sierra Bonita to come to terms with her; only to despise herself in the next moment for even thinking that Camilla would take interest in her (even as a ghost). Camilla's strength and treacherous nature is exemplified in the couch scene (again a fantasy of Diane's), where she appears without the soft, gentle and cunning veil she wears at the party: this time, her blunt encouragement ("you drive me wild") is followed by an equally blunt denial ("we shouldn't do this any more"). She's been told that things won't happen the way she tries to, and her naive nature has made her the victim of similar pranks in the past ("I've tried to tell you this before"). Diane becomes forceful because she has grown tired of being kicked around in Hollywood and watching her dreams ebb ever further away from her.

The verdict, in Diane's mind, is that there is no issue, other than to sublime her infatuation into a perfect, beautiful, uncomplicated, trustworthy, open tale of love and companionship with Rita in the other world, where time is eternal and space unbounded.

The verdict, in my mind, is that the beauty lies in Diane's soul and aspiration. She's a full, living, breathing and broken being coming to life in all her complexity and depth right in front of our eyes, telling us of her past, some of it true, some untrue, in a masteful and unequalled painting of human nature.
Jan 21, 2007 7:43 PM
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Mulholland Drive Silver jubilee for me last night!

What struck me was the fine and professional appearance of the magician. He's well-dressed, is married (wedding band), and aptly represents convention, the establishment, society. Devilish (in the viewer's eyes), but professional.

By comparison, the Emcee is clothed in a bright red suit, the color of desire, and has more of a dandy look. He has few words to say because he introduces the voice of emotion, the voice of the heart, that doesn't always go by the established rules (Cookie also warns Adam that the establishment is after him).

Interesting that both lawyers have a mustache/beard, hadn't noticed that before. The only other characters that sport a mustache are Joe (who also stands for a different type of justice: the immediate, revengeful, outlaw kind), Bob Brooker (who is prompted to voice a judgment about Betty's audition performance), and Mr Roque (the very embodiment of the establishment, whose decisions don't even need to be voiced, and are carried out instantly).

In this context, Rebekah's fall is a tragedy; it signifies the failure for the heart to make a case, to face the evidence. The two darlings are thunderstruck at the sentence that falls on Rebekah; they both understand what it means for their relationship, but more so Betty, who's in much deeper than her lover (she declared her love, but it went unanswered a few hours before).


[Mild FWWM spoiler ahead]

By the way, wasn't Laura Palmer also crying to the angels? She had that picture on her wall, of angels that appeared or disappeared with her growing and declining self-esteem. Someone on IMDb mentioned that Laura and Ronette are in the theater also watching the show (the figures look similar, even if they don't appear to me to be the very same characters).
Jan 30, 2007 1:06 PM
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spiff06In this context, Rebekah's fall is a tragedy; it signifies the failure for the heart to make a case, to face the evidence. The two darlings are thunderstruck at the sentence that falls on Rebekah; they both understand what it means for their relationship, but more so Betty, who's in much deeper than her lover (she declared her love, but it went unanswered a few hours before).
But nothing happened to Rebekah because she plays herself, part of the illusion. Rebekah is part of the same world as ourselves, the real audience, as distinguished from the fictional audience in Club Silencio, and hopefully nothing has happened to any of us except that maybe we learned something.

[QUOTE] [Mild FWWM spoiler ahead]

By the way, wasn't Laura Palmer also crying to the angels? She had that picture on her wall, of angels that appeared or disappeared with her growing and declining self-esteem.[/QUOTE]Traditionally, La Llorona is crying for the children that she killed. To this day her spirit remains so powerful that she is seen in the halls of the Public Employee's Retirement Association building in Santa Fe, New Mexico, even though it is a modern building. (See PERA Building, bottom of page.) It just happens to be in the area she haunts. I think Laura was crying for the angels who had gone away, grieving for herself. David Lynch has commented on this that angels can go away but they can also come back.

[QUOTE]Someone on IMDb mentioned that Laura and Ronette are in the theater also watching the show (the figures look similar, even if they don't appear to me to be the very same characters).[/QUOTE]I have seen the rumor that David Lynch has been asked about that and has said that they are not Laura and Ronette. So now someone on the internet has said that someone else on the internet said that he said that. But it is only a movie, so how would he know?
Jan 30, 2007 1:59 PM
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In the court of law context, which is the topic of this thread, I see Rebekah as a witness pleading for Diane.

I have switched context since my last post in a different thread. I am nearly as linear in my posts as Mulholland Drive itself.



Berny Rabbit Traditionally, La Llorona is crying for the children that she killed. To this day her spirit remains so powerful that she is seen in the halls of the Public Employee's Retirement Association building in Santa Fe, New Mexico, even though it is a modern building. (See PERA Building, bottom of page.) It just happens to be in the area she haunts.
Interesting, isn't it? Kind of like Peggy Entwistle.
Jan 30, 2007 3:36 PM
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Spiff,

When I likened the Blue haired lady to a judge and Silencio to a courtroom, I really meant it in a very loose sense. I enjoyed reading your comments and they caused me to think a bit more about this courtroom scenario.

One of the earliest credible reviews I read of MD argued that the ENTIRE dream was Diane's and it was essentially a presentation of the pros and cons of Diane culpability in Camilla murder and therefore the justice of her punishment...the suicide. The earlier, promising scenes of a talented, virtuous and eager Betty with the right connections and a shot at stardom would be evidence of "reasonable cause" or "justifiable homocide".

Then, the constant interruptions of doom and gloom as in the 1st Winkies scene; the Louise Bonner episode; the visit to Sierra Bonita would be the prosecutory part of Diane's mind, trying to keep her(Diane) focused on the horror of her deed. "No, it not okay ....someone is in trouble!"

Likewise, the Castegliane brothers scene; the Adam Kesher story and the hitman's clumsy efforts are the defences attempt to mitigate the crime...she was forced, "help me!!!" and maybe it did not really happen the guy could have been incompetent.

The article pointed out however that right from the word go, it was clear that the defence had an uphill task. It is as if something deep inside of Diane understood that her destiny was indeed her fault...her attitude, did, to a large extent, determine the way her life became. The best evidence of this is in the knowing smiles of the old couple. This, btw, would make Diane an even more noble, decent but tragic character IMO.

What the long dream does is put into pictures, stories if you like, that illustrate the moral contradictions and depth of feeling within Diane's sleeping mind. Thru her dream characters we see and feel all the different emotions that made her. We even understand what a talent she truly might have been had things truned out differently. Because this movie did not originate with this particular story in mind, this is why I find MD to be a true classic if somewhat accident masterpiece.

It is within this context that I see the Blue haired lady as a judge, a rather stern one at that..not so much for the Silencio scene alone but for her one word pronouncement at the end of the film, after "justice" has been done.

One final word about Silencio. Yes it awakens Diane (and us) slowly from what must be a very lucid dream by that time. It lets her(and us) know all what passed was not real; it brings us to reality. However I also think it is Lynch biggest hint as to the structure and point of his movie. The victim forces her killer to go there. Essentially to be tried and the verdict is "yes" go ahead. Directly after silencio, Betty goes... she IS not real, so does Rita... another illusion, Aunt Ruth cannot be reborn, the Cowboy tells her " it's time to wake up"...meet reality, meet your destiny. Diane has no choice but to submit to what she already knew she had to do.

After she wakes up, thru what I see as tainted flashbacks Diane tries yet again to make Camilla look incredibly cruel, and to justify her actions and avoid suicide yet even then she cannot deny that Camilla attempted to explain something to her "don't let it be like that".

As Diane continues to ponder her recent past, trying to recreate the masturbatory fantasy she had in her sleep when Rita and Betty made love, she fails to reach climax. There is nothing left. The knock could have been from anyone, her neighbor, the cops, a passer by, it would not have mattered Diane's mind is finally and irrevocably made up she only needs some unpleasant reminder from her past (the old couple) to send her over the edge to her destiny.

After that the Blue haired judge says " Silencio!" "It has ended!"
Jan 30, 2007 9:46 PM
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Whoa, Lance.

To sum up what you wrote above, Diane has been busy elaborating scenarios for her own defense in her mind, to attempt to explain Camilla's disappearance convincingly for herself. Of course, that is doomed to fail.

What's also going on in Diane's mind, both in dream and waking, is her last fight to come to terms with herself; but every step along the way, obstacles come up that remind her of her own inner feeling of culpability, which haunts her constantly and makes a knot in her stomach, driving her mad.

Diane engages into a continuation, or retelling of the dream when she wakes up, using its symbols to support her sexual fantasy. She tells the story over again, tries frantically to recapture that moment of grace with Rita, only to realize that, in dream as in fantasy, her love goes unanswered and is duped, joked at. And it makes her angry to be misunderstood, because such is her self-destructive attitude.

She fails to exorcise her fear, her guilt, and is left staring at the blue key on her coffee table, that ominous sign she dreads to see, the evidence she's been trying to hide, from herself and the world, in dreaming and waking. That God-awful feeling she's been trying to get rid of. The girl is still missing. Rita has been sucked into a Blue Box. The key must not be found. By the way, these two detectives came by again this morning looking for you.

Guilty.


Mmmh...

Lance, your post has been preoccupying me for the past couple of days. Although I do like to jump around between contexts and viewpoints, up to now, my primary take had developed into considering the dinner party as the real-world origin from which all dream and post-dream fantasy symbols are derived. This view had been shaken for a little while, when pondering over the Lamp Lady's identity and the reappearance of the piano ashtray during Diane's fantasy, so much so that I've been verging on filing the dinner party in the fantasy land cabinet. But delving into the context you drafted above and considering the fantasy as a continuation of Diane's dream and an internal pleading for her own, desperate case, raises a host of questions I hadn't considered in a while.

Which is, like, totally cool.

I have my own ideas, but if you can spare some time, I'd love to hear what your take is on the dinner party: vagary, or reality? Is Coco truly Adam's mother, or just another coconut in Dr. Jacoby's office? Is Dan real? WAS Dan real? Who is Joe?
Feb 1, 2007 12:17 PM
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Spiff,

After pondering and discussing this movie for nearly three plus years I have come to the point where I can truly say I am satisfied. Although my explanation is definitely not accepted by all, I have not heard anyone else's that does not leave huge chunks of the movie unexplained.

My first breakthru with this movie was after someone pointed out to me that it really made no sense to talk about the dream characters as if they had their own existences since they were all generated by Diane. After that someone else pointed out that there is little else in the entire movie other than what Diane either DREAMS or REMEMBERS. If you accept those two concepts as fact, then MD becomes an entirely different (a simpler yet more complicated story)

I have also learned, during that time, not to shut any doors completely however. What's real or not real in MD is really in shades of grey, I think. I'll explain what I mean this way: Lynch deliberately makes ambigious both the chronological order and the demarkation of the last 30 minutes of the movie. Yes, it makes the movie harder to figure out, but it also mimics the confused meanderings of a, psychotic mind. We cannot expect Diane to clearly and unbiasly remember her affair with Camilla...not just before she blows her brains out over her. Since Diane is not a reliable narrator, we have to filter out her possible exaggerations. Each viewer is forced to independently think of what might have been a more likely explanation of how things might have really happened. The viewer does this armed with the events of the dream and flashbacks and the key scenes would be the dinner party and Winkies.

Essentially, what we see in those scenes are the characters with whom Diane builds her dream. The only constant is that NONE of the characters there are anything like their look-alikes in Diane's dream. Diane also deposits her strongest emotional outbursts in the dream, in the characters whom she knew the LEAST at the party and Winkies...Dan, a Castigliane brother and Wilkins. It took me the longest while to realise that the dog ****t in the courtyard was Diane's artful way of saying what she thought of what Wilkins, the guy who sat next to her at the party, was saying. In that scene Betty is kept pure because Diane has Coco beride Wilkins for his dog ****t...even though it was Diane who felt the real Wilkins words sounded like dog****t perhaps.

So was Dan real etc etc?...follow the outline in my second paragraph above, trust yourself I guarantee you me nothing will remain a puzzle to you in MD anymore. It is one complete movie and now I see why Lynch has never really commented on the story etc. When you get it ...you get it.

It makes so much sense that Diane would attempt to resolve her situation by dreaming other possible scenarios, that is a function of our dreams. It also makes a lot of sense that even after the dream Diane would try to recall things in such a way that she could avoid the need to kill herself.
Feb 2, 2007 12:43 PM
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That's all agreed. There is indeed little else in the movie that doesn't belong in Diane's mindscape, and dreams, most of the times, serve to counterpoint or resolve waking situations.

But, I've read your post carefully, and you mention that, for you, Diane pours her strongest emotional outbursts into those people she knew the least, at the party and Winkie's. So your view is that:
[list=1]the cup that's lying on her coffee table comes from Winkie's.[/list] So with regards to #1, I believe our common view is similar, in whole or in part, with the dinner party analysis that was posted a while ago. Naturally, although many of the symbols used in the dream might have been taken from the dinner party, what we see is Diane's retelling of it, so we can't really trust that everything is fitting (the SOS cup, for example).

As for #2, you obviously consider that the diner exists, although it's possibly not called Winkie's in the real world (in fact, it's only called Winkie's the first time around, the other two times, when the Dianebetty waitress is there, we're just in a diner that we assume to be named Winkie's). Yet, in keeping with your excellent principle to not shut any door completely, we come to wonder whether the cup, that's sitting on her coffee table as poor Diane loses her mind entirely, comes from "Win keys", or serves as a focal point around which she knits her story around a diner. Although the former feels more sensible, I haven't entirely ruled out the latter.

And, yes, it's Wilkins' dog('s) poo. Took me a while to figure that out too, since you have to read the credits to find out Coffey's character is named Wilkins...
Feb 7, 2007 7:45 PM
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spiff06As for #2, you obviously consider that the diner exists, although it's possibly not called Winkie's in the real world (in fact, it's only called Winkie's the first time around, the other two times, when the Dianebetty waitress is there, we're just in a diner that we assume to be named Winkie's).
What does the waitress' name tag say?
Feb 7, 2007 8:38 PM
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Berny RabbitWhat does the waitress' name tag say?
Right on, we're in Winkie's all three times.
Feb 7, 2007 8:41 PM
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I see one of you but I don't see me. Maybe one of us is dreaming?



Feb 7, 2007 11:57 PM
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Spiff06,

Yes, I would accept both 1 & 2 provisions above with the qualification that the dinner party did not really happen completely as Diane recalls. I would leave a lot of leeway for Diane's envy of Camilla and her wish to justify her actions. I would also submit that none of the characters in the dream actually have the names or designations they are given in the dream. So Dan is just another customer we do not know his real name; Herb never existed; the neighbor did not swap apartments with Diane and Adam is not a movie director necessarily, etc.

I realise of course for those whose see the movie differently this makes no sense at all but for me it really crytallizes the story very much.
Mar 25, 2007 1:32 PM
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