Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Joined: Jul 2006
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Rumpled 4 Skin
crumbsroom



Super low budget film about flying killer fish and a bunch of bad dancers who commandeer an abandoned yacht for an 80's tit party. Terrible, but hilariously so.




You had me at tit party

D'oh... seen it... my copies called Plankton, but yeah it's cheesey good
Jun 11, 2017 9:28 PM
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...and why do we have to go back like 400 pages to read the last post on here
Jun 11, 2017 9:30 PM
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Thanks to Rumpled I saw Plankton and it is good cheesy fun. I also watched Alligator 2. Not as fun but still cheesy good.
Jun 11, 2017 10:42 PM
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Rumpled 4 Skin...and why do we have to go back like 400 pages to read the last post on here

I've gotten in the habit of going straight to the last page offered. And even sometimes, that's still not enough.
Jun 13, 2017 3:01 AM
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I need more time alone....

I got Amazon Prime, so now I have the burden of far too many films to see. This means that I probably won't be hate-watching The Accountant (sorry, Nameless) or Suicide Squad, and focus on more positive pleasures. Like hate-watching Pete's Dragon.

I don't even care about spoilers. Duck. First five minutes, we kill the parents. Now Pete was always an orphan, and abused - probably sexually, but back then Disney had the class to keep a foot on the floor, so to speak. No. Here? Mom, Dad...dead. And I don't know if you remember, but I always thought that it was some heavy shit that got laid on my five-year-old ass watching The Earthling (That's where they also killed off little Ricky Schroeder's parents, but had the decency to wait until the second reel.) But today's post-9/11 kids, I guess they can handle the trauma. So the kid, Pete, is thrown from the car, and he looks back at the wretched vehicle, and we get the single-tear moment. That's it, your parents are never waking up, your world has collapsed, this single tear will miraculously imbue the maturity of the fact of mortality and necessity of suffering. And within another couple of minutes, little Dalai Lama child has his Spielbergian scene of awe and wonder when Elliot the dragon emerges like the exact kind of magical plush toy that can alleviate the loss of love in a chaotic world.

It didn't get any better. 4/10
Jun 13, 2017 3:18 AM
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Hey Janson how come you don't rate your movies in the rate the last movie you watched thread like all the normal people here? Or do you think you're too cool for school?
Jun 13, 2017 3:39 AM
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I guess crumbsroom isn't a big Pete-hate fan.

I've been immersed in this documentary section, although I've noticed, like Netflix, there sure is a lot of Youtube-conspiracy-worthy crap on here. (OK, I watched one on the Heaven's Gate cult, but only because I was right about the eggs!)

Magician is an Orson Welles documentary, and is an ideal introduction to his work. Not much new information for me however.

Altman and DePalma are more to my speed. Through tours through each filmography with the latter providing plenty of meticulous commentary, and both including lots of student, shorts and work footage, a good overlook of Altman's TV years and home movies. Best revelation: even DePalma was bored stiff by Mission to Mars.

Char-ac-ter is a scattershot compilation interview with a handful of character actors - Harry Dean Stanton, Dabney Coleman, Peter Falk, Charles Grodin, Sydney Pollock (in probably his last appearance). There's not a lot of congruity between each of them, other than being character actors, but I can listen to this stuff all day.

That Guy Dick Miller - And speak of the devil himself.

Gimme Danger - Jim Jarmusch's Stooges film, and about as awesome as you could hope. Iggy Pop is remarkably sharp for his age and experience, and it's a wonder how he managed to keep his head in good enough condition to produce such lucid, detailed and perceptive recollection.

One More Time With Feeling is Andrew Dominik's B&W (and apparently 3D) film about Nick Cave recording his album Skeleton Tree shortly after the death of his teenage son. I don't think the death is ever explicitly acknowledged, only "that thing" or "the trauma". Nick is miserable, ashly magnetic, the barriers are immediately established, and performances of "Jesus Alone" and "I Need You" are still insanely moving.
Jun 15, 2017 5:51 AM
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So I watched this yesterday:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k27mr6p-yhY

And it mentioned this study:

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/enjoyment-of-trash-films-linked-to-high-intelligence-study-finds-a7171436.html

"To such viewers, trash films appear as an interesting and welcome deviation from the mainstream fare", says Sarkhosh. "We are dealing here with an audience with above-average education, which one could describe as 'cultural omnivores'. Such viewers are interested in a broad spectrum of art and media across the traditional boundaries of high and popular culture." He went on to explain that their engagement in film culture is demonstrated by their discussion of these films in blogs and forums.

You read that? We are cultured beings, with above average intelligence.



Only a moron would think an over-sized fish comb isn't pure genius.
Jun 16, 2017 3:10 AM
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They're showing a 4K restoration of Funeral Parade of Roses?(1969) this weekend. It's touring North America so you guys should check out when it's coming to you. It couldn't be a more timely release with its love triangle story and experimental Andy Warhol inspired execution.
Jun 16, 2017 11:22 PM
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Janson JinnistanI guess crumbsroom isn't a big Pete-hate fan.

I thought you were talking about the original and had no idea a remake existed. My mind is great when it comes to forgetting about these pointless retreads.
Jun 17, 2017 12:21 AM
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Janson Jinnistan

Gimme Danger - Jim Jarmusch's Stooges film, and about as awesome as you could hope. ?Iggy Pop is remarkably sharp for his age and experience, and it's a wonder how he managed to keep his head in good enough condition to produce such lucid, detailed and perceptive recollection.


I have been dying to see this since I heard about it.
Jun 17, 2017 12:22 AM
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SkyDog
"To such viewers, trash films appear as an interesting and welcome deviation from the mainstream fare", says Sarkhosh. "We are dealing here with an audience with above-average education, which one could describe as 'cultural omnivores'. Such viewers are interested in a broad spectrum of art and media across the traditional boundaries of high and popular culture." He went on to explain that their engagement in film culture is demonstrated by their discussion of these films in blogs and forums.

You read that? We are cultured beings, with above average intelligence.



Only a moron would think an over-sized fish comb isn't pure genius.

This was a nice article to reference when I consistently get eye rolls when they hear the names of some of the movies I watch. "What are you, stupid?", is a pretty familiar refrain.

While intelligent may in some ways be a bit of a back patting stretch, cultural omnivore I think is a pretty fair description of 'junk film' fans. To really appreciate these kinds of film there has to be an deeply ingrained understanding of what makes your average movie tick, from the way that films are plotted, blocked, scripted and cut, and it's this knowledge that allows one the ability to instinctively appreciate the value of films that step around these traditional beats. Good amateur films always feel as if they are forging new ground from scene to scene, and for viewers who are sick to death of being able to anticipate every edit in your average every day film. these movies seem quantifiable more alive than 95 percent of the fare that ends up in theaters. I feel I know more about the personality of whoever it was that directed Yeti, than I ever will no about giant successful nobody's like Tom Hooper or James Wan.
Jun 17, 2017 12:35 AM
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Black PhilipThey're showing a 4K restoration of Funeral Parade of Roses?(1969) this weekend. It's touring North America so you guys should check out when it's coming to you. It couldn't be a more timely release with its love triangle story and experimental Andy Warhol inspired execution.

Great movie. I think Little Ash turned me onto that one a few years ago.

Hey, lux, what was the name of that cheapo French slasher you found on You Tube a few years ago. The Bloody Butcher? The Mad Maniac? I can't remember for the life of me.
Jun 17, 2017 2:28 AM
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Joined: Aug 2016
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crumbsroom
Black PhilipThey're showing a 4K restoration of Funeral Parade of Roses?(1969) this weekend. It's touring North America so you guys should check out when it's coming to you. It couldn't be a more timely release with its love triangle story and experimental Andy Warhol inspired execution.

Great movie. I think Little Ash turned me onto that one a few years ago.

Hey, lux, what was the name of that cheapo French slasher you found on You Tube a few years ago. The Bloody Butcher? The Mad Maniac? I can't remember for the life of me.

Mad Mutilator?

PS - I love how it says 'add a plot' on the IMDB page. There was no plot to think of. Just a random set of violent events including the epic thrashing of a car.
Jun 17, 2017 2:58 AM
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Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 10850
Black Philip
crumbsroom
Black PhilipThey're showing a 4K restoration of Funeral Parade of Roses?(1969) this weekend. It's touring North America so you guys should check out when it's coming to you. It couldn't be a more timely release with its love triangle story and experimental Andy Warhol inspired execution.

Great movie. I think Little Ash turned me onto that one a few years ago.

Hey, lux, what was the name of that cheapo French slasher you found on You Tube a few years ago. The Bloody Butcher? The Mad Maniac? I can't remember for the life of me.

Mad Mutilator?

PS - I love how it says 'add a plot' on the IMDB page. There was no plot to think of. Just a random set of violent events including the epic thrashing of a car.

Yes, that's it. Thanks.
Jun 17, 2017 2:59 AM
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This isn't some movie that's low aspirations and medium talent turn it into a great piece of art. It isn't. It's a pedestrian late 80's bio horror flick. As low budget as it is it is traditionally competent to the point that I am surprised I was as engaged as I was for most of it. As a story it falters on most levels, but it has relatively engaging characters, from the friendly chap who lives in a junk yard, to Homer the Pest Control Expert, and knows how to flow fairly smoothly as a little cockroach infestation movie. It also benefits from having a bit of a gonzo finale.

Absolutely unnecessary, but not unworthy as a passive watch.

A shrugging shoulders strong 6/10, whatever the fuck that means.
Jun 17, 2017 3:05 AM
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crumbsroomI thought you were talking about the original and had no idea a remake existed. My mind is great when it comes to forgetting about these pointless retreads.

I'm here to help.

Actually, my interest in that film was less about any nostalgia for the original (and, yeah, that's right, it's a preschool classic) than that it was the follow-up film from David Lowery, who made the legitimately good film Ain't Them Bodies Saints. It was curious to see how that Malick/Altman-influenced working-class style would translate the tale, and surprisingly it received lots of good reviews, 87% RT score in fact. The fools. Lowery has two films coming out this year, although the first one, A Ghost Story, is the one receiving mild ridicule for having Casey Affleck literally wearing a sheet throughout. I want to believe, based on that stellar debut, that Lowery will come into his own, and something like the badly bungled tone of his Pete's Dragon, which he did co-write so must assume much of the blame, was a misstep or an errant experiment.

crumbsroomI have been dying to see this since I heard about it.

It might be worth just plucking it down for a hard disc copy.

Getting back to Lester Bangs, have you gotten very far into his book?

Another doc I saw this week was Ticket to Write, and despite its dumb name and inability to afford any music licenses (they must have blown the budget on one Dictators track), it's a pretty entertaining run through that seminal generation of rock criticism. Of course, Bangs is front and center, but also lots of love to things like Paul Williams' Crawdaddy, and some of the lesser known critics like Nick Tosches, Richard Meltzer, Billy Altman and tries to shine a helpful light on Creem's unsung secretary Jaan Uhelszki who was one of the magazine's most important contributors and one the first major female critics. She claims that Bangs and Dave Marsh were especially eager to push more female writers, somewhat relaxing their image as a rough and tumble boys club (although Bangs and Marsh did fight a lot).

There were some slight omissions that I would have liked to have seen more of. I wish a stronger connection to jazz criticism could have been made, as jazz critic Ralph J. Gleason was arguably one of the most influential critics of any medium, and had been the one to suggest the name Rolling Stone, drawing the arc from Muddy Waters to the Stones to Dylan, in lieu of Jann Wenner's insistence of naming his new publication The Electric Newspaper. I would have liked to have seen more about Greil Marcus and Robert Palmer. Marcus is mentioned, of course, but kept at a grandfatherly distance. It would have been nice to mention Cheetah, the super-rare short-lived zine from 1967. Also, the film prefers to taper off after the punk explosion, so we don't have any of the indignities of digging through more modern criticisms, but still, it would have been nice to delve into the better names of the 90s, like Simon Reynolds, Jim Greer, Ann Powers.
Jun 17, 2017 3:33 AM
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Janson it's like your head is one large hard drive.
Jun 17, 2017 4:16 AM
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crumbsroom
Black PhilipThey're showing a 4K restoration of Funeral Parade of Roses?(1969) this weekend. It's touring North America so you guys should check out when it's coming to you. It couldn't be a more timely release with its love triangle story and experimental Andy Warhol inspired execution.

Great movie. I think Little Ash turned me onto that one a few years ago.

Hey, lux, what was the name of that cheapo French slasher you found on You Tube a few years ago. The Bloody Butcher? The Mad Maniac? I can't remember for the life of me.


Cinelicious is releasing a North American blu-ray and is why it's touring the US. It doesn't hit my area until July, but I already have my tickets. Odds that I triple-dip on the blu-ray?* Pretty high, I say.

*: I already have the Masters of Cinema DVD and the Japanese blu-ray.

Jun 17, 2017 4:36 AM
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Little AshCinelicious is releasing a North American blu-ray

This is what I needed to know.
Jun 17, 2017 5:13 AM
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