THAT song is from a movie?!

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Just the other day, I was trying to track down a copy of The Tubes' "Gonna Get It Next Time", which was an exclusive for the film Modern Problems. It's not a great track, pretty typical 80s cheese-rock, but the film is a nostalgic favorite. I also have a soft spot for Michael McDonald's "Sweet Freedom", from Running Scared, which is the definition of soft dad-rock, I always kinda liked it as late summer breezy fare.

It seems like the 80s were prime time for these kinds of tie-in hit singles - "Against All Odds", "Live To Tell", "Teacher, Teacher", "Spies Like Us", "We Don't Need Another Hero", and of course the popular soundtracks to Beverly Hills Cop, Footloose, Purple Rain, etc.

But most of them are well known enough that I doubt they would surprise anyone. I was actually surprised about "Somebody's Baby", which I assumed had been taken from Lawyers in Love, but I was wrong.

Yello's "Oh Yeah" wasn't made for a particular movie, but it should have been. Everyone knows it from one movie or another.
Aug 11, 2017 1:46 AM
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Janson JinnistanJust the other day, I was trying to track down a copy of The Tubes' "Gonna Get It Next Time", which was an exclusive for the film Modern Problems. ?It's not a great track, pretty typical 80s cheese-rock, but the film is a nostalgic favorite. ?I also have a soft spot for Michael McDonald's "Sweet Freedom", from Running Scared, which is the definition of soft dad-rock, I always kinda liked it as late summer breezy fare.

It seems like the 80s were prime time for these kinds of tie-in hit singles - "Against All Odds", "Live To Tell", "Teacher, Teacher", "Spies Like Us", "We Don't Need Another Hero", and of course the popular soundtracks to Beverly Hills Cop, Footloose, Purple Rain, etc.

But most of them are well known enough that I doubt they would surprise anyone. ?I was actually surprised about "Somebody's Baby", which I assumed had been taken from Lawyers in Love, but I was wrong.

Yello's "Oh Yeah" wasn't made for a particular movie, but it should have been. ?Everyone knows it from one movie or another.

"Oh Yeah" has been used in a lot of films, but as a reference to Ferris Bueller's Day Off. For some younger viewers, their point of origin is the Nth film to reference Bueller using this song, so for them there is no link to a prior film. These tadpoles only have filmic memory of the late 1990s. But in terms of our collective consciousness, the origin is clearly a call-back to Bueller. At a certain point, when the enough old timers have exited the room and only the youngsters are around, no one really members how Oh Yeah was a particular reference or homage, it becomes freed of the original film and just becomes "that song they sometimes play to signify coolness." We're not at that point yet, however. At this point, the creative intention behind the reference is still a callback to Bueller and I'd wager that at least half the audience catches the reference. It's still "stuck" to Bueller, but someday it may become unstuck in the way that the Wilhelm Scream has almost no connection now to The Charge at Feather River.


Aug 11, 2017 2:02 AM
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?Janson Jinnistan

It seems like the 80s were prime time for these kinds of tie-in hit singles -

Yes. The early 90s seems to be the point where you started to see the "songs from and inspired by" soundtracks, where a good number of the songs weren't in the movie at all. Batman and Dick Tracy are two of the earliest I remember (Prince & Madonna). Then the rest of the 90s were rife with those catch-all soundtracks like Twister, where bands would donate outtakes and b-sides, some of which actually made it into the film. You still had the occasional Bodyguard or Titanic, but this is just my long way of agreeing that the 80s was when this was most prominent. Footloose alone had 4 hits that I recognize from the radio, and I've never seen the film.

Bonus points for remembering "Teacher Teacher". I always suspected you were a closet .38 Special fan. Let's not forget "Back to Paradise" from Revenge of the Nerds II.
Aug 11, 2017 2:35 AM
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PenarinI'm setting my daughter up for this. She's six, and for some reason "Eye of the Tiger" is her favorite song. One day, in 2024, she'll be watching Rocky III and be like, damn, I know that song!

Nice, I got the Rocky III soundtrack for Christmas '83 (age 12). "Eye of the Tiger" and "Gonna Fly Now" on the same album? I was one pumped-up tween for the next year. It's a wonder I didn't medal at the Olympics or something.
Aug 11, 2017 2:40 AM
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NotReallyYARNAutism Guy"Oh Yeah" has been used in a lot of films, but as a reference to Ferris Bueller's Day Off. For some younger viewers, their point of origin is the Nth film to reference Bueller using this song, so for them there is no link to a prior film. These tadpoles only have filmic memory of the late 1990s. But in terms of our collective consciousness, the origin is clearly a call-back to Bueller.

I think that you may be surprised how many people associate the song with The Secret of My Success, which is one of those 80s films (and there's a lot) that millennials seem to champion.
Aug 11, 2017 2:48 AM
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Captain TerrorBonus points for remembering "Teacher Teacher". I always suspected you were a closet .38 Special fan.

Nah. I'm a JoBeth Williams fan.
Aug 11, 2017 2:50 AM
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I didn't realize until just a few days ago that the monster hit (one of the biggest singles of all time) "How Do I Live" by Trisha Yearwood was attached to Con Air. While technically the song is not from the movie, it was released just a week before the movie, so for many people, it essentially is "that song from the movie."

Of course, it would have been a Billboard monster with or without the help of a bro-tacular R-rated action extravaganza. But I just thought it was funny that such a lovey-dovey song was launched cinematically in such a dude-bro summer action movie. You'd expect it to belong to some chick flick or at least something like Titanic, where a romance is the central story.
Aug 11, 2017 3:51 AM
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jasper de largeI didn't realize until just a few days ago that the monster hit (one of the biggest singles of all time) "How Do I Live" by Trisha Yearwood was attached to Con Air. While technically the song is not from the movie, it was released just a week before the movie, so for many people, it essentially is "that song from the movie."

Of course, it would have been a Billboard monster with or without the help of a bro-tacular R-rated action extravaganza. But I just thought it was funny that such a lovey-dovey song was launched cinematically in such a dude-bro summer action movie. You'd expect it to belong to some chick flick or at least something like Titanic, where a romance is the central story.


I always associate Sweet Home Alabama with it. "Define irony. Bunch of idiots dancing on a plane to a song made famous by a band that died in a plane crash."

Aug 11, 2017 4:00 AM
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Janson Jinnistan
NotReallyYARNAutism Guy"Oh Yeah" has been used in a lot of films, but as a reference to Ferris Bueller's Day Off. For some younger viewers, their point of origin is the Nth film to reference Bueller using this song, so for them there is no link to a prior film. These tadpoles only have filmic memory of the late 1990s. But in terms of our collective consciousness, the origin is clearly a call-back to Bueller.

I think that you may be surprised how many people associate the song with The Secret of My Success, which is one of those 80s films (and there's a lot) that millennials seem to champion.

I would be. That is a later and inferior film. When I was a kid, we all knew Oh Yeah as the Ferris Bueller song. Whenever I'd put it on a mix tape, that's how it would be recognized by listeners. But public memory is a matter of perception, not being right. For many, I am sure it is just vaguely an 80s song now.

Aug 11, 2017 4:05 AM
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The memory's a bit foggy, but I'm having trouble discerning whether a particular song of Anthrax was released before or after its bassline was used in John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars. I also keep hearing different versions (three by now) of Sammy Hagar's "Heavy Metal", wondering if the Heavy Metal version was a rerecording or the original. Hubris, thy name is the Mandela Effect!

Catbus
Rated NCC-1701
Wooley
PenarinSpeaking of Fast Times... The Cars, "Moving in Stereo." Wow. There's a perfect blend of song and scene. And another fun surprise for me, since I've known the song since the 80s and was shocked when it came on during that one scene

And, famously, the Kashmir moment.

: tells kid to play Led Zeppeln IV :

: kid plays "Kashmir" from Physical Graffiti:

I'M JUST SAYING!

I'd thought that was intentional, showing how Ratner screws everything up.

A rather keen insight. I'll keep that in mind.
Aug 11, 2017 7:07 AM
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Feuer und Eis
"Amoreena" by Elton John - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mE34JvLqWK0&t=38s

The best opening song ever! "Dog Day Afternoon" is in my top five! Great call
Aug 11, 2017 10:25 AM
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Janson Jinnistan
NotReallyYARNAutism Guy"Oh Yeah" has been used in a lot of films, but as a reference to Ferris Bueller's Day Off. For some younger viewers, their point of origin is the Nth film to reference Bueller using this song, so for them there is no link to a prior film. These tadpoles only have filmic memory of the late 1990s. But in terms of our collective consciousness, the origin is clearly a call-back to Bueller.

I think that you may be surprised how many people associate the song with The Secret of My Success, which is one of those 80s films (and there's a lot) that millennials seem to champion.

Doubly surprised.

One is that Oh Yeah wasn't instantly thought of with Ferris Bueller. Two is that anyone is championing Secret of My Success.

A couple of songs do bring back memories: Not just of film, but also TV as well.

Think---Blues Brothers
Twist It (Shake Your Tail Feather)---Blues Brothers
Night and Day---Cosby Show Season 1
Ave Maria---Sister Act
Aug 12, 2017 1:02 AM
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AC/DC - Shoot to Thrill - The Avengers

AC/DC - Thunderstruck - Battleship

Alice in Chains - Got Me Wrong - Clerks

Beastie Boys - Sabotage - Star Trek: Beyond

The Blasters - Dark Night - From Dusk Till Dawn

Guns N' Roses - Welcome to the Jungle - GTA: San Andreas trailer

Sammy Hagar - I Can't Drive 55 - Back to the Future 2

Harvey Danger - Flagpole Sitta - Disturbing Behavior trailer

House of Pain - Top O' the Mornin' to Ya - Daredevil

Elton John - Tiny Dancer - Almost Famous

Marvin Gaye - Let's Get On - High Fidelity

Metallica - Master of Puppets - Old School

Metallica - For Whom the Bell Tolls - Zombieland

Motorhead - Ace of Spades - Shoot 'em Up

Aug 12, 2017 12:58 PM
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Captain Terror
?Janson Jinnistan

It seems like the 80s were prime time for these kinds of tie-in hit singles -

Yes. The early 90s seems to be the point where you started to see the "songs from and inspired by" soundtracks, where a good number of the songs weren't in the movie at all. Batman and Dick Tracy are two of the earliest I remember (Prince & Madonna). Then the rest of the 90s were rife with those catch-all soundtracks like Twister, where bands would donate outtakes and b-sides, some of which actually made it into the film. You still had the occasional Bodyguard or Titanic, but this is just my long way of agreeing that the 80s was when this was most prominent. Footloose alone had 4 hits that I recognize from the radio, and I've never seen the film.

Bonus points for remembering "Teacher Teacher". I always suspected you were a closet .38 Special fan. Let's not forget "Back to Paradise" from Revenge of the Nerds II.

I kinda miss those days.
All For Love- The Three Musketeers. Bryan Adams, Rod Steward, AND Sting.

Everything I Do- Robin Hood: Prince of Theives
Aug 16, 2017 3:38 PM
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NotReallyYARNAutism Guy
PenarinI've heard "Somebody's Baby" by Jackson Browne 1000 times on the radio. I had no idea it was from a movie. Then I finally watched Fast Times at Ridgemont High and damn, there was the song. Used in such a perfect way. Now I'll always think of that movie when that song comes on. ?

Same with "In The City" by Joe Walsh. Classic rock radio plays that song all the time, but I had no idea it had movie fame until I watched The Warriors. Perfect song for the ending credits. ?

On the flip side, I've never seen Say Anything but at least know about the famous scene where "In Your Eyes" plays.

Anyone else get pleasantly surprised to connect a famous song to a famous movie?

Have you ever watched the unofficial sequel?

The Wild Life? Never heard of it until you mentioned it but it sounds amazing.
Aug 16, 2017 4:00 PM
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Penarin
NotReallyYARNAutism Guy
PenarinI've heard "Somebody's Baby" by Jackson Browne 1000 times on the radio. I had no idea it was from a movie. Then I finally watched Fast Times at Ridgemont High and damn, there was the song. Used in such a perfect way. Now I'll always think of that movie when that song comes on. ?

Same with "In The City" by Joe Walsh. Classic rock radio plays that song all the time, but I had no idea it had movie fame until I watched The Warriors. Perfect song for the ending credits. ?

On the flip side, I've never seen Say Anything but at least know about the famous scene where "In Your Eyes" plays.

Anyone else get pleasantly surprised to connect a famous song to a famous movie?

Have you ever watched the unofficial sequel?

The Wild Life? Never heard of it until you mentioned it but it sounds amazing.

I love that movie. Eric Stoltz, Chris Penn, Lea Thompson, Randy Quaid... good soundtrack, pretty funny. The part with Quaid's character - a heroin-addicted Vietnam vet - is pretty sad, and sort of mirrors the abortion scene from Fast Times. For the most part they're pretty consistently funny but they have a couple of darker scenes like that to add a sense of realism to the stories.
"That's casual."

Aug 16, 2017 5:38 PM
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Recall that 1980s song, "That's What Friends Are For" sung by Elton John, Stevie Wonder, Dionne Warwick and Gladys Knight, which turned into an anthem for AIDS research/ prevention.

Song actually was recorded years earlier by Rod Stewart, who sang it during the end credits of Night Shift, which starred Henry Winkler and basically introduced Michael Keaton.
Aug 16, 2017 5:38 PM
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Death ProofMetallica - Master of Puppets - Old School

Metallica - For Whom the Bell Tolls - Zombieland

These have to be two of my favorites. The first one with them chasing down the pledges in their van and the flying tackle into the fountain. Fucking hilarious. And For Whom the Bell Tolls is one of the awesome opening credits of any film.

Aug 16, 2017 5:43 PM
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pugmanRecall that 1980s song, "That's What Friends Are For" sung by Elton John, Stevie Wonder, Dionne Warwick and Gladys Knight, which turned into an anthem for AIDS research/ prevention.

Song actually was recorded years earlier by Rod Stewart, who sang it during the end credits of Night Shift, which starred Henry Winkler and basically introduced Michael Keaton.

Aug 16, 2017 5:45 PM
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Joined: Dec 2007
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D.H.
Death ProofMetallica - Master of Puppets - Old School

Metallica - For Whom the Bell Tolls - Zombieland

These have to be two of my favorites. The first one with them chasing down the pledges in their van and the flying tackle into the fountain. Fucking hilarious. And For Whom the Bell Tolls is one of the awesome opening credits of any film.

Everything about this post is awesome and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter and/or periodical.
Aug 16, 2017 5:46 PM
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