Is there a more hot/cold director than Ridley Scott?

Original Poster
Joined: Jan 2002
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All time greats:

- Alien
- Blade Runner
- Gladiator
- Kingdom of Heaven Director's Cut

Absolute garbage:

- 1492: Conquest of Paradise
- GI Jane
- Hannibal
- A Good Year
- Robin Hood
- Prometheus
- Exodus: Gods and Kings
etc

There are some good movies in there as well (e.g. Black Hawk Down or The Martian), but given how amazing some of his movies are the amount of clunkers is pretty shocking.
Mar 19, 2017 12:28 AM
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Part of me wants to say Christopher Nolan. Memento was an amazing film. However, I've found many of his other films to be overrated. His only films that I haven't seen are Following, Insomnia, and Batman Begins. I'll likely see Dunkirk once it gets released. Ridley Scott is probably the best example I can think of though.
Mar 19, 2017 1:00 AM
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Gladiator is an all time great? Gross.
Mar 19, 2017 1:03 AM
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Perhaps Rob Reiner?
Mar 19, 2017 1:23 AM
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Yeah, I'm not that big on Gladiator as well.
Mar 19, 2017 1:48 AM
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Off the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.
Mar 19, 2017 2:04 AM
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Woody Allen
Mar 19, 2017 2:09 AM
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MKS
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BadLieutenantOff the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.

I don't think he deserves to be grouped with the others. His second to last film Tetro was very good and at times brilliant. Was it the Conversation or the Godfather? No but it may have been the next Rumble Fish.
Mar 19, 2017 2:30 AM
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MKS
BadLieutenantOff the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.

I don't think he deserves to be grouped with the others. His second to last film Tetro was very good and at times brilliant. Was it the Conversation or the Godfather? No but it may have been the next Rumble Fish.


The next Rumble Fish is something I can completely live without.
Mar 19, 2017 2:35 AM
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MKS
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BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenantOff the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.

I don't think he deserves to be grouped with the others. His second to last film Tetro was very good and at times brilliant. Was it the Conversation or the Godfather? No but it may have been the next Rumble Fish.


The next Rumble Fish is something I can completely live without.

Not a fan of RF or Tetro? Why not, fam?
Mar 19, 2017 2:55 AM
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MKS
BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenantOff the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.

I don't think he deserves to be grouped with the others. His second to last film Tetro was very good and at times brilliant. Was it the Conversation or the Godfather? No but it may have been the next Rumble Fish.


The next Rumble Fish is something I can completely live without.

Not a fan of RF or Tetro? Why not, fam?


Rumble Fish I hate, but I think that has more to do with my loathing of S.E. Hinton and her melodramatic idiocy. I think she is and was a peddler of warmed-over, sub-Rebel Without a Cause, faux-teen angsty, cliche-riddled garbage and Rumble Fish (together with Coppola's adaptation of The Outsiders) fits neatly within that estimation. It's a vehicle for a bunch of young male actors' posturing at being James Dean (who was already posturing at being Brando) and little else. There wasn't much Coppola could do to rescue such material.

Tetro I thought was just ambling and rather unremarkable. The acting was good across the board, but I don't think the material ever came together into anything I found compelling.
Mar 19, 2017 3:06 AM
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John Huston and Sidney Lumet had a lot of good and bad movies side-by-side throughout their careers. probably a result of working so often.
Mar 19, 2017 3:57 AM
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MKS
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BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenant
MKS
BadLieutenantOff the top of my head, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood, especially in the present day. The pace of their output and the fact that they're both at the stage of their careers where, professionally at least, they have nothing left to prove I think combines into a real crap shoot of quality. And the late-career hits (Midnight in Paris, Sully) generally seem to pave over memories of the truly dreadful ones (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Hereafter).

I'd add De Palma to the list, but he seems to fit more into the category of directors who have simply lost their touch altogether (see also Francis Ford Coppola, Oliver Stone, John Landis, et al.). Femme Fatale was probably his last gasp, and that was 15 years ago.

I don't think he deserves to be grouped with the others. His second to last film Tetro was very good and at times brilliant. Was it the Conversation or the Godfather? No but it may have been the next Rumble Fish.


The next Rumble Fish is something I can completely live without.

Not a fan of RF or Tetro? Why not, fam?


Rumble Fish I hate, but I think that has more to do with my loathing of S.E. Hinton and her melodramatic idiocy. I think she is and was a peddler of warmed-over, sub-Rebel Without a Cause, faux-teen angsty, cliche-riddled garbage and Rumble Fish (together with Coppola's adaptation of The Outsiders) fits neatly within that estimation. It's a vehicle for a bunch of young male actors' posturing at being James Dean (who was already posturing at being Brando) and little else. ?There wasn't much Coppola could do to rescue such material.

Tetro I thought was just ambling and rather unremarkable. The acting was good across the board, but I don't think the material ever came together into anything I found compelling.

I thought Coppola's technical prowess and experimentation combined with the performances (Rourke came as close to Brando as Dean ever did by my approximation) more than made up for any narrative short comings, though I have a higher appreciation for Hinton than you do.
I find the ways that Coppola has manifested his personal life on screen in Tetro and Twixt make for remarkable cinema, if only quality cinema with the former.
Mar 19, 2017 4:09 AM
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Bob Clark

Mar 19, 2017 4:57 AM
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John Carpenter often fluctuated between merely great, really great, and Ghosts of Mars.
Mar 19, 2017 10:50 AM
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I prefer Coppola's flawed experiments to Woody Allen's mediocre regurgitations of the last 20 years or so. I don't think Allen has made a great film in that time, but when he manages something that doesn't induce sleep, he gets overpraised (Midnight in Paris being the most recent example). Coppola may be inconsistent, but he's still interested in pushing his form, not always successfully. I find that a lot more interesting than many late-career directors.
Mar 19, 2017 12:19 PM
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Also, where the fuck is The Duellists, you philistines?
Mar 19, 2017 12:20 PM
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And lastly, in contrast to the typical late-era decline in some directors, Scott has always been inconsistent. After his first three classics, he's been iffy. I think that De Palma and Stone, and Allen as well, among those mentioned, all have had fairly established stretches of success before their drop-off, and so I think Scott, outside of his initial brilliance out the gate, didn't have that.

And full disclosure, I like The Counselor and Prometheus more than many posters here, and Matchstick Men is also better than many contemporary efforts of the directors mentioned here.
Mar 19, 2017 12:26 PM
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Terry Gilliam, maybe? Like Scott, he only has a handful of good to great movies (Time Bandits, Brazil, The Fisher King and 12 Monkeys, off the top of my head) while most of the rest of his filmography could best be described as interesting failures and one flat-out bad movie (The Brothers Grimm). When either of these guys have a new movie coming out, I have the same "Oh yeah! But then again, he made..." reaction.
Mar 19, 2017 2:23 PM
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The Wachowskis. They blend visual philosophy with goofy pedantry in so much of a stream of consciousness resembling first drafts, it seems like Hayao Miyazaki wrote actual scripts all along.

Also, Walter Hill. And Rob "Meathead" Reiner. And Carl Reiner. Pretty much every Reiner and Reitman.

Death ProofBob Clark.


/thread

IllyriaAll time greats:


- A L I E N (10/10)
- Blade Runner (9/10)
- Gladiator (6/10)
- Kingdom of Heaven (7/10)

.Absolute garbage:


- GI Jane (7/10)
- Hannibal (6/10)
- Robin Hood (6/10)
- Prometheus (7/10)
- Exodus: Gods and Kings (5/10)

.etc.


Thelma and Louise (8/10)
Matchstick Men (8/10)
White Squall (7/10)
Legend (7/10)
How He Treated Jerry Goldsmith On Legend (DICK MOVE/10)


He's pretty lukewarm to me.

Janson JinnistanAlso, where the fuck is The Duellists, you philistines?


I swear that I saw it. Long ago. CAN'T REMEMBER IT, EVEN THOUGH, Y'KNOW, THE KIETEL AS AN ARISTOCRAT, SO THERE'S THAT/10?
Mar 19, 2017 3:37 PM
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