Netflix is doing away with star reviews

Original Poster
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 19534
That's a shame. I rate everything I see and put some thought into it. The result is the star predictor for me is eerily accurate.
Mar 18, 2017 1:50 AM
0 0
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 11815
I find it to be very inaccurate, almost reverse-accurate. Most of the better films I've seen on there - Hard to Be a God, Cemetery of Splender, Arabian Nights, The Assassin - have a star or a star and a half. My tastes are admittedly out of the mainstream, but I just have never found it helpful, when I notice it at all.
Mar 18, 2017 2:06 AM
0 0
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 40999
This is good news. Most people treat star ratings--as opposed to binary ratings--as information provided to other viewers, as opposed to helping craft recommendations for themselves. Some people don't--which means people are approaching the purpose of the star ratings inconsistently. This is just inefficient and unhelpful for everyone. An up/down system will function more consistently. Did you like it? Yes? Great.
Mar 18, 2017 2:11 AM
0 0
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 11677
Does how other people rate it effect how it is rated for me? If so, thumbs up or down s the way to go, because otherwise you have Rabid types who don't understand how ratings work and doing things like "This movie was pretty meh, so only four stars." A straight yes or no, like a fresh or rotten, is better for individual reviews.
Mar 18, 2017 2:51 AM
0 0
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 40999
ZubenDoes how other people rate it effect how it is rated for me? If so, thumbs up or down s the way to go, because otherwise you have Rabid types who don't understand how ratings work and doing things like "This movie was pretty meh, so only four stars." A straight yes or no, like a fresh or rotten, is better for individual reviews.


The star ratings function the same as Amazon; a thing is rated what it is rated based on collective reviews. What is recommended to you is based on your demonstrated preferences. The star rating works better as a sort of objective collective assessment--like the average rating part of the Tomatometer. But a binary rating will be superior at providing personalized recommendations to you. That's my take anyway.
Mar 18, 2017 2:59 AM
0 0
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 19534
There's a generic star rating that's just a collective average. This is worthless to me. There's a predictive star rating based on patterns of how others have rated films in comparison to your own rating pattern. That is dead-on most of the time for me and I use to to make decisions about material I'm not familiar with.
Mar 18, 2017 3:06 AM
0 0
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 11815
Esoteric AllusionThere's a generic star rating that's just a collective average. This is worthless to me. There's a predictive star rating based on patterns of how others have rated films in comparison to your own rating pattern. That is dead-on most of the time for me and I use to to make decisions about material I'm not familiar with.

Well, then it could be that, since I haven't rated any films myself, the function appears to me as the former case.
Mar 18, 2017 3:09 AM
0 0
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 40999
I guess, personally, the entire concept of the recommendation is useless to me. I've not once watched something I've never heard of, let alone based on a recommendation. I watch things based on word-of-mouth and critics reviews; I've never been on Netflix and been like, "No idea what this is, let's try it." I take not having heard of something as a bad sign.
Mar 18, 2017 3:21 AM
0 0
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 8900
NimChimpskyI guess, personally, the entire concept of the recommendation is useless to me. I've not once watched something I've never heard of, let alone based on a recommendation. I watch things based on word-of-mouth and critics reviews; I've never been on Netflix and been like, "No idea what this is, let's try it." I take not having heard of something as a bad sign.

Pretty much this except with anime and non-fiction documentary type stuff.
Mar 18, 2017 3:23 AM
0 0
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 45022
I think when you're dealing with some sort of public rating system on a subjective medium, you need to employ a weighting algorithm. Ideally you show two ratings. One an unweighted average and one that shows what people think who like the things that you like.
Mar 18, 2017 3:56 AM
0 0
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14527
I'm way more likely to sit at a Netflix screen and try to remember something one of you guys recommended than, I dunno, browse and look at star ratings. Although if something highly rated pops up that fits a genre I love-- like horror-- I'm likely to google it and check the tomatometer and reviewers I like to see if I should give it a shot. I'd imagine this is pretty much how any movie fan operates, anyway. Or, you know, humans with smart phones approaching any decision ever.
Mar 18, 2017 3:57 AM
0 0
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14527
MeowI'm way more likely to sit at a Netflix screen and try to remember something one of you guys recommended than, I dunno, browse and look at star ratings. Although if something highly rated pops up that fits a genre I love-- like horror-- I'm likely to google it and check the tomatometer and reviewers I like to see if I should give it a shot. I'd imagine this is pretty much how any movie fan operates, anyway. Or, you know, humans with smart phones approaching any decision ever.

I would never condone illegal activity, but while we're talking about streaming, I'd like to say Exodus for Kodi (for Amazon firestick?) has changed my life. It's like Netflix but, you know, a crime. A streaming HD, new releases, no hassles crime.
Mar 18, 2017 4:01 AM
0 0
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 11385
I often find myself trolling for random genre stuff because I'm (too) often in the mood for something quick and easy and agree with EA about the star-rating algorithm. I will be watching shittier horror movies because of this.?
Mar 18, 2017 5:17 AM
0 0
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 62551
I just decided to rewatch Stranger Things. No reason to post it here. Netflix, you know.
Mar 18, 2017 5:37 AM
0 0
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7906
Sometimes when watching Netflix, I will remember there is a rating system and think "who the hell actually uses that?" - both in terms of rating movies and listening to said ratings as a guide. The answer is EA, I guess.

I am with Nim and others that want to watch a movie based on other criteria. I use Netflix to consume maybe 15% of my films, and I have to actively seek it out. If Netflix doesn't have it, I move on to the next source. I think the only genre of film I go to Netflix just to actively browse titles is documentaries, for which Netflix has a decent catalogue. Even then, there are some shit documentaries that users rate favorably, so I never listen to the rating anyway.

I tend to find most user based rating to be either too bland, or too subject to political opinions. I have no idea how Netflix weighted their results, but apparently it's not working for them either.
Mar 18, 2017 12:43 PM
0 0
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7906
theVictorianI think when you're dealing with some sort of public rating system on a subjective medium, you need to employ a weighting algorithm. Ideally you show two ratings. One an unweighted average and one that shows what people think who like the things that you like.

Part of Netflix's strategy with the new rating system is that when people are given only two options to rate films, apparently they are far more likely to do so. If Netflix has a good algorithm, this is a way to get more baseline data from which to draw.
Mar 18, 2017 12:47 PM
0 0
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 45022
Dyne
theVictorianI think when you're dealing with some sort of public rating system on a subjective medium, you need to employ a weighting algorithm. Ideally you show two ratings. One an unweighted average and one that shows what people think who like the things that you like.

Part of Netflix's strategy with the new rating system is that when people are given only two options to rate films, apparently they are far more likely to do so. If Netflix has a good algorithm, this is a way to get more baseline data from which to draw.

I suspected it might be something like this. It's also possible that there'll only be one option like Facebook, meaning that rating only gets active enthusiasm behind it.
Mar 18, 2017 1:03 PM
0 0
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 10523
NimChimpskyThis is good news. Most people treat star ratings--as opposed to binary ratings--as information provided to other viewers, as opposed to helping craft recommendations for themselves. Some people don't--which means people are approaching the purpose of the star ratings inconsistently. This is just inefficient and unhelpful for everyone. An up/down system will function more consistently. Did you like it? Yes? Great.

I dunno. Like EA, I rate everything I watch based on my own preferences, and Netflix's predictions of what my rating will be is almost dead on at this point. That's even with people using ratings incorrectly.

Whenever people complain that the rating system doesn't work for them, I assume they're either like JJ (and don't realize the predictions improve as they rate), or they rate based on what they assume other people's enjoyment will be. This change will probably improve predictions for these jackasses, but it'll make it less precise for people like me.
Mar 18, 2017 1:14 PM
0 0
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 10523
It always always annoys me when tech companies kill the nuance in their products to make it more accessible to new users / clueless users. Why get rid of the nuance all together? Why not have a power user mode that allows for fine grained customization, and set the product's default settings to accommodate the lowest common denominator. The power users won't mind having to dig through settings options to enable functionality.
Mar 18, 2017 1:23 PM
0 0
Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 12764
theVictorianI think when you're dealing with some sort of public rating system on a subjective medium, you need to employ a weighting algorithm. Ideally you show two ratings. One an unweighted average and one that shows what people think who like the things that you like.


My recollection is that is how the Netflix system currently operates (and other people in the thread are confirming that to be the case).
I kind stopped rating movies on there just because at some point, I always felt inconsistent. Three or four stars could mean a lot of different things hem rating. And that didn't help with the "it's so bad it's good genre," which utterly confused my brain when I try to rate it. Should it be a 1 or a 4?
Mar 19, 2017 10:38 PM
0 0