HORRORCRAM XIV: DaMU you all to Hell

Original Poster
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 10917
DaMU's sterling horror montage would like to welcome you to the latest incarnation of horror Discussion and MUsings.

Unfortunately after years of updates and improvements many of the past threads have been lost to the aether. Here are some of the remaining examples:

Horrorcram X: We Need to Talk About Wooley

Horrorcram XI: I Spit on your Post

Horrorcram XII: Children Shouldn't Play with Ed's Thing!

Horrorcram XIII: Takoma and Her Thread of Wonders!
Dec 3, 2015 5:04 AM
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Posts: 63074
I had posted links to most of them not that long ago... I'll try to find them.

Dec 3, 2015 5:10 AM
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Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 63074
Im gonna cram my skull with HORROR!!!

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/616497?page=1


Cramming Skull with Horror! 2 : Revenge of Monster Rape


http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/580662?page=1

Horror Cram 3! Excuse me waiter, theres a tentacle in my bum

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/583796


Horror Cram 3.5! The Beast rapes at midnight

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/558378


Horror cram 4! Yes, the giant worm is still violating your holes

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/558762?page=1


Horror Cram 5: The George Kennedy Forced Love Machine

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/560464


Horror Cram 6: The Tom Atkin's Mustache Worship Society

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/568894?page=1


Horror Cram 7: David Gale's Beach Boys BBQ Blowout Bash Blast

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/550108


Horror Cram 8: Stuart Gordon's Lovecraftical Boobtastical Goreporium

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/553114?page=1


HORRORCRAM 9: Z Dies At The End

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/534861


Horrorcram X: We Need to Talk About Wooley

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/555193?page=1


Horrorcram XI: I Spit on your Post

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/829724


Horrorcram XII: Children Shouldn't Play with Ed's Thing!

http://forum.rottentomatoes.com/topic/show/533232?page=1
Dec 3, 2015 5:43 AM
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Joined: May 2006
Posts: 5648
Alright I made it in on the first page for once.
Dec 3, 2015 6:44 AM
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Posts: 9718
Me too!


Now what?  Guess I'll watch Krampus this weekend.
Dec 3, 2015 7:20 AM
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Posts: 10917
I'll kick off with my two last viewings.


The Case of The Scorpion's Tail.

This is all over the place and has a feeling of being made up on the spot.
This begins in London, before moving on to Athens & everybody in the world only speaks Italian.

& yet it makes for some very entertaining, top-tier giallo.
Sergio Martino hasn't let me down yet.





The Eyes of Laura Mars.

I was not aware that this was based on a John Carpenter script. I think he must have watched quite a few Italian giallo's as there is a lot of similarities here.

Unfortunately, it didn't quite give me the amazement level I was expecting. And considering the other films Faye Dunaway had done during this period are some of my all time favourites, I'm a bit deflated.
Dec 3, 2015 7:30 AM
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Hey folks! I recently watched and enjoyed The Vampire Lovers from Hammer Studios. A nice entertaining vampire flick. Plus boobs and Peter Cushing. 
Dec 3, 2015 7:45 AM
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Posts: 5648
MadManHey folks! I recently watched and enjoyed The Vampire Lovers from Hammer Studios. A nice entertaining vampire flick. Plus boobs and Peter Cushing. 

Peter Cushing's boobs? I'm there!
Dec 3, 2015 7:56 AM
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Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 13321
I'm hot as a hornet.  Let's fry this DaMU-cile.
Dec 3, 2015 9:23 AM
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Posts: 7555
Let me grab my seat. May check out Last Shift and give some thoughts.
Dec 3, 2015 9:27 AM
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Posts: 8028
I finally watched Son a Frankenstein (1939) and was pleasantly satisfied with the results. It was good to see Basil Rathbone, Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi all in the same film. I also realised how much this movie influenced the parody Young Frankenstein (1974) and it was fun joining the dots. What I really liked about it though were the sparse sets and the lighting techniques which made the film visually stunning. The stairway set was particularly memorable 

Dec 3, 2015 9:43 AM
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Posts: 5648
Love the staircase shot. Its such a minimal build, but with the lighting it really pops out. Excellent example of doing more with less.
Dec 3, 2015 9:58 AM
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Posts: 60172
What is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.
Dec 3, 2015 11:15 AM
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Posts: 27502
DeschainWhat is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.

"Last Shift," not "Late Shift."  From Anthony DiBlasi, director of Dread (pretty okay) and Cassadaga (oof).
Dec 3, 2015 11:18 AM
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MKS
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 46701
DaMU
DeschainWhat is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.

"Last Shift," not "Late Shift."  From Anthony DiBlasi, director of Dread (pretty okay) and Cassadaga (oof).

We gonna gab about that one or Crimson Peak?
Dec 3, 2015 11:23 AM
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Crimson peak was weak soup, empty calories.  A decorative pastry filled with dust.  I even think del Toro's visual style failed him on this one.
Dec 3, 2015 11:30 AM
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Posts: 27502
Master King Sexington
DaMU
DeschainWhat is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.

"Last Shift," not "Late Shift."  From Anthony DiBlasi, director of Dread (pretty okay) and Cassadaga (oof).

We gonna gab about that one or Crimson Peak?

All right...

Crimson Peak.  Too gorgeous for its own good.  Lovely and more or less entertaining.  Chastain was fabulous aping the Mrs. Danvers Rebecca style, and while it was a predictable story beat, I like that Del Toro committed to her relationship with her brother.  There could've been an easy way out to appease censors or what have you.  The ghosts pop in too quickly and disappear too quickly.  Wanted more suspense.  Allerdale Hall aka Crimson Peak is such a perfect piece of production design, so impeccably crafted and decadent, that it ultimately failed to unnerve me in the way movie spaces like Hill House, the Overlook, and Danvers Mental Hospital did.  It's so lush and perfectly Gothic and accentuated with grace notes (like the little snowfalls) that I wanted to live there.  Even literary inspirations like Wuthering Heights and the House of Seven Gables created a more threatening mood when I read their respective books.  Mia Wasiowska has done this sort of role before, she's fine, but I wanted less tea-weakened Mia and more vivacious past-resolving Mia.  Chastain, though, my God, she won't get any nominations on account of the kind of film this is and the broad sort of role she's given, but what a performance.

I wanna see it again to see if I feel the same way, but it's more the Mimic/Pacific Rim school of GDT, where I enjoy watching his idiosyncrasies worm their way into what could've been an empty pulp exercise.  Part of the fun is seeing that clay contraption appear in the first act and thinking, "Oh, it's a gear-heavy steampunk device, if this doesn't end up in the third act, I'm not watching a GDT movie."
Dec 3, 2015 12:12 PM
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MKS
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 46701
DaMU
Master King Sexington
DaMU
DeschainWhat is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.

"Last Shift," not "Late Shift."  From Anthony DiBlasi, director of Dread (pretty okay) and Cassadaga (oof).

We gonna gab about that one or Crimson Peak?

All right...

Crimson Peak.  Too gorgeous for its own good.  Lovely and more or less entertaining.  Chastain was fabulous aping the Mrs. Danvers Rebecca style, and while it was a predictable story beat, I like that Del Toro committed to her relationship with her brother.  There could've been an easy way out to appease censors or what have you.  The ghosts pop in too quickly and disappear too quickly.  Wanted more suspense.  Allerdale Hall aka Crimson Peak is such a perfect piece of production design, so impeccably crafted and decadent, that it ultimately failed to unnerve me in the way movie spaces like Hill House, the Overlook, and Danvers Mental Hospital did.  It's so lush and perfectly Gothic and accentuated with grace notes (like the little snowfalls) that I wanted to live there.  Even literary inspirations like Wuthering Heights and the House of Seven Gables created a more threatening mood when I read their respective books.  Mia Wasiowska has done this sort of role before, she's fine, but I wanted less tea-weakened Mia and more vivacious past-resolving Mia.  Chastain, though, my God, she won't get any nominations on account of the kind of film this is and the broad sort of role she's given, but what a performance.

I wanna see it again to see if I feel the same way, but it's more the Mimic/Pacific Rim school of GDT, where I enjoy watching his idiosyncrasies worm their way into what could've been an empty pulp exercise.  Part of the fun is seeing that clay contraption appear in the first act and thinking, "Oh, it's a gear-heavy steampunk device, if this doesn't end up in the third act, I'm not watching a GDT movie."

Well, I don't find too much to disagree with here. I've compared it to Pacific Rim, in that Del Toro seems to have dedicated himself to making a "true" entry in a specific genre to the point that he defies our post modern expectations and adheres to the formula to a fault: transporting all the flaws as well as its virtues. 

This film seeks to follow a truly predictable plot but plays it out as if it's still fresh and astounding, to where revelatory scenes are shrug worthy. 

However, not enough can be said for the set design and even the ghost design, which I found to be great and sadly Mama'd, in which they tamper with a practical effect until it no longer seems tangible and becomes unconvincing. One of my favorite aspects of the film is how the bodies of the ghosts tell the story, such as the one with the missing finger, that telegraphs the ring snatching long before it occurs. 

I want to rewatch it again because, as I enjoyed it, I found it disappointing, falling far short of the Devil's Backbone and Pan's Labyrinth, despite constantly evoking them. I think with adjusted expectations and watching it with the same Hammer horror or Bava scale in mind, it could improve the way Pacific Rim did for me after a Kaiju marathon and copious amounts of alcohol... and 3D. The only way PR is meant to be watched. 
Dec 3, 2015 12:48 PM
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Posts: 60172
Crimson Peak was gorgeous and a great example of using a color palette to help tell the story. The first act is rather slow though and it reminded me a bit too much of Devil's Backbone.

Found Last Shift on Netflix, thanks.
Dec 3, 2015 1:31 PM
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Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 9476
DaMU
DeschainWhat is this Late Shift everyone keeps talking about? I can't find it on Netflix.

"Last Shift," not "Late Shift."  From Anthony DiBlasi, director of Dread (pretty okay) and Cassadaga (oof).

Casadaga was so bad . . . just so bad. I mean, I went into the movie at like 1am, just wanting bottom-of-the-barrel cheap schlock, and even with those expectations I was pretty let down.


billtheburger


The Eyes of Laura Mars.

I was not aware that this was based on a John Carpenter script. I think he must have watched quite a few Italian giallo's as there is a lot of similarities here.

Unfortunately, it didn't quite give me the amazement level I was expecting. And considering the other films Faye Dunaway had done during this period are some of my all time favourites, I'm a bit deflated.

I think the one word I'd use to describe The Eyes of Laura Mars is disappointing. I'd loved the poster for years (the one with just her face with the illuminated eyes), but the movie itself felt like it never really dug in. Neat premise with a bland execution.
Dec 3, 2015 1:55 PM
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