I don't read enough

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 283
Mysterious DudePortnoy's Complaint - this guy sure has a lot to say about his own penis.

haha, it was of its time. I read most of his shit when I was about 11-13 years old so it was first consciousness, early 80's, grot was scarce, no internet, we had to rifle through Dad's drawer or scab smutty paperbacks. I read this and cock talk 100%, wft, this Philip Roth freak, with his balls flapping in the wind of each page, was my new god, couple him with Vidal and Updike and it was my Newfound Holy Trinity?Of Dick Talk.

David Brin "Existence" (2012)

0/10.

Unbelievably, I gave up on a book after 550 of the 650 pages. WFT. It was sort of chundering along, plundering its way thru tech talk raffles and sci-fi paper symposiums shoehorned in and tarted up as fictional prose, nerdy jarringly-inept conversations jammed in there until I belatedly realized, you know what, this is going nowhere, I don?t give a shit about a single character in this stupid doorstop of a book. And neither do you Mr Author. How shit of an author do you need to be to impart that feeling upon Dear Reader, at the 550 page juncture, precisely when all the narratives should be starting to weave together into a thrilling loving machination of page-turning pure consciousness? This shit. Idiotically, after 550 pages I finally read the authors blurb. NASA guy, phD in Science etc. Of course. All makes sense now. That explains the clumsy conversations where all the characters have the same voice amidst the deluge of story-rappeling futurey scifi tech talk. Sciencey guy writing a novel just because he fucken can. GTFO. Admittedly, the futurey sci-fi techtalk is really well done, probably prescient with all the Virtual Bollox etc. No fucks given. Maybe I?m just not a sci-fi guy? In summary, Updike, Roth and Vidal didn?t try and build a fucken space shuttle BOOMFAH.
Sep 13, 2017 2:46 AM
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 17202
I finally finished It. Really, really dug it, but the Fonz was on the motorcycle and he was revving the engines at the end there. I'd be interested in reading a defense of THAT scene that they wisely excised from the movie if anyone wants to offer one. It was jarring and unnecessary from my perspective.

Also, the Turtle was... uh. Underwhelming. King does a really good job of developing the lore of Derry, but when he starts trying to build a cosmology for his universe, things get a bit dicey.?
Oct 7, 2017 5:32 PM
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 17202
Wait, the Fonz doesn't jump over a shark tank in a motorcycle. I'm not sure why I was so confident those where the specifics of the event that phrase referred to.
Oct 7, 2017 5:53 PM
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Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 12080
JeanI finally finished It. Really, really dug it, but the Fonz was on the motorcycle and he was revving the engines at the end there. I'd be interested in reading a defense of THAT scene that they wisely excised from the movie if anyone wants to offer one. It was jarring and unnecessary from my perspective.

Also, the Turtle was... uh. Underwhelming. King does a really good job of developing the lore of Derry, but when he starts trying to build a cosmology for his universe, things get a bit dicey.?

No one defends that scene. King will if you ask him, so google some interviews if you want to see him flail about. One of the key elements of horror is the idea of "that which should not be"--from slasher films (people in expressionless masks don't just walk down your quiet neighborhood street like a thresher) to cosmological Lovecraftian beings. Something that overturns the reader and protagonists notion of the predictable orderliness of their lives and view of the universe. So over-explaining things in a horror story is especially problematic. It renders them mundane or silly or prosaic. I was really drawn into the first part of It when I read it (as a teenager) but the more layers King peeled back, the duller it became. The two best scenes, by far, are the first in each time period (George and his boat, Stan and his bath). Because there's nothing there but the terror of confronting something that should not be.
Oct 7, 2017 5:53 PM
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 17202
Infinitus Corsair
JeanI finally finished It. Really, really dug it, but the Fonz was on the motorcycle and he was revving the engines at the end there. I'd be interested in reading a defense of THAT scene that they wisely excised from the movie if anyone wants to offer one. It was jarring and unnecessary from my perspective.

Also, the Turtle was... uh. Underwhelming. King does a really good job of developing the lore of Derry, but when he starts trying to build a cosmology for his universe, things get a bit dicey.?

No one defends that scene. King will if you ask him, so google some interviews if you want to see him flail about. One of the key elements of horror is the idea of "that which should not be"--from slasher films (people in expressionless masks don't just walk down your quiet neighborhood street like a thresher) to cosmological Lovecraftian beings. Something that overturns the reader and protagonists notion of the predictable orderliness of their lives and view of the universe. So over-explaining things in a horror story is especially problematic. It renders them mundane or silly or prosaic. I was really drawn into the first part of It when I read it (as a teenager) but the more layers King peeled back, the duller it became. The two best scenes, by far, are the first in each time period (George and his boat, Stan and his bath). Because there's nothing there but the terror of confronting something that should not be.

A lot of the fun in setting up big mysteries is peeling back the layers. One of my favorite scenes in the book is Ben's first encounter with It as an adult because It actually engages him in a conversation, which sort of breaks the rules that have been established and upsets the equilibrium, making you wonder what else is right around the corner.

There's definitely a balance between preserving an abstract, visceral reaction to some unknown entity and offering up the creature naked and undisguised, like King eventually does, and the book hits a lot of that good middle ground. It just goes a bit too far too fast.
Oct 7, 2017 6:10 PM
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Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 41347
Reading It again as an adult, I was really affected by the end, when they already start to forget again. I found that incredibly bittersweet. I have problems with a lot of it?mostly how it instrumentalizes the characters instead of having their resistance be purely organic, but it was a book I?ll always love, just because I sort of grew up with it.
Oct 7, 2017 7:13 PM
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Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 41347
Side note, been meaning to read Annihilation forever now, but just saw the movie trailer, and it was...not what I thought. In an interesting way.
Oct 7, 2017 7:20 PM
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 17202
NimChimpskySide note, been meaning to read Annihilation forever now, but just saw the movie trailer, and it was...not what I thought. In an interesting way.

Yeah, I was going to start that trilogy but my local book store is sold out, so I'll probably just read The Stand, which has been sitting on my shelf for a while now.
Oct 7, 2017 7:32 PM
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Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 12080
NimChimpskySide note, been meaning to read Annihilation forever now, but just saw the movie trailer, and it was...not what I thought. In an interesting way.

Hey, that's next up for me. You guyssssss--book club!
Oct 7, 2017 10:17 PM
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Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 41347
Infinitus Corsair
NimChimpskySide note, been meaning to read Annihilation forever now, but just saw the movie trailer, and it was...not what I thought. In an interesting way.

Hey, that's next up for me. You guyssssss--book club!


Im maybe 20% in. Its great. Really weird and super engrossing.
Oct 11, 2017 4:35 AM
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 17202
Deep Thoughts by Jack Handey.?

DAE remember the 90s?!? "If you saw two guys named Hambone and Flippy, which one would you think liked dolphins the most? I'd say Flippy, wouldn't you? You'd be wrong, though. It's Hambone." "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face." "It takes a big man to cry, but it takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man."

Oh, man. That's some good proto-tweeting.
Oct 11, 2017 4:37 AM
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Joined: May 2004
Posts: 3614
Annihilation is pretty great. I have no idea how they are going to adapt some of it to film, though. I'm not sure what else to say about it that doesn't also spoil little bits of it. I will say that it's fairly bananas, and it's no surprise to me that the film version apparently a bit looser with the details and beats of the novel, because I'd say it would pretty much have to be.
Oct 11, 2017 7:05 AM
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