Disallowed Explanations in "Dream" Theory

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Joined: Nov 2001
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This is for those that believe the "dream" theory for the first part of MD (as I do), and also anyone who believes any theory that this part takes place soehow in Diane's mind (fantasy, hallucination, etc.). No explanation for a charactrers' behavior other than Bettys') can be based on their inner life; that is, you cannot attributer their actions to their feelings, thoughts etc. They have no feelings, no thoughts, no inner life, as they are only in Diane's mind. All explanations of their behavior MUST be based on Diane alone. For a dream, only "dream logic" will do, real world logic does not apply. I am referring to, for example, the "simple" explanation that Rita changes her hair out of fear about being killed. This explanation works in reality but not in a dream. In Diane's dream, everything represents only a thought, feeling or sensation of Diane. It can be symbolic, it can be disguised in a pun, an association, distorted, inverted, or otherwise obscured, but it is always Diane. Remember, Diane's dream cannot have anything that is not Diane!
Nov 28, 2001 3:12 PM
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Excellent point! I'm not one who believes she changes her hair out of fear but for those who did Diane could have her be afraid in her dream so she could save her by changing her hair so you have be careful when you say they cant have feelings and thoughts. They can have these if Diane dreams/fantasizes that they have fear, love etc. So I am agreeing with you that everything has to come from Diane its just that others feelings can come from her.
Nov 28, 2001 10:23 PM
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True, true, it all comes down to:

1- Who or what each person represents TO DIANE- for instance, I believe that the dream form of Coco represents a motherly figure for Diane, as Diane is fresh out of water in a new environment-

2- What function each person serves- what use does Diane have for each of these dream-figures? I think Diane used Coco as a warm basis for her "transition" to LalaLand/LA.

3- How do each of these dream figures change/interact with Diane/interact with each other? Using Coco again as an example, throughout the dream she remained stable and caring towards Diane, yet her sole interaction with another dream figure (the crazy woman) led her to caution Diana about Rita/Camilla being bad news (the woman who she killed and would soon bring about the loss of the fantasy, LalaLand, and the impending realization of what she had truly done to Rita and to herself).

HOWEVER- Even contemporary Freudian dream analysis cautions us to keep in mind that mundane and irrelevent details that we absorb as info on a daily basis are sometimes given inflated and exaggerated weight in our dreams. Example- people on this board are giving too much importance to the name "Betty," questioning what it means or what it stands for. I think Lynch clearly used it in the diner scene when Diane met with the hitman as a name she noticed, out-of-the-blue, on the waitress's name tag. She then incorporated this minute bit of information into the dream, creating a naive and chipper character with the name Betty. The name is a label, a name tag for Diane, nothing more.
Funny as it may sound, we all do it in our dreams. Certain themes or stories that make you scratch your noggin the next day and wonder "WHY in God's name was I dreaming about THAT" may be based on stimuli you absorbed the day before. Stimuli that you were not even CONSCIOUSLY aware of.
Jan 9, 2002 4:45 PM
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Yes, yes, sing it -- I agree wholeheartedly.
Jan 9, 2002 6:17 PM
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[QUOTE]

Funny as it may sound, we all do it in our dreams. Certain themes or stories that make you scratch your noggin the next day and wonder "WHY in God's name was I dreaming about THAT" may be based on stimuli you absorbed the day before. Stimuli that you were not even CONSCIOUSLY aware of. [/B][/QUOTE]

Yes, I believe the term is "day residue." Bits and pieces of our waking life that seem of no significance at the time, but which trigger something in our subconscious, thereby getting absorbed into our dreams.

What is also true, I believe, is that you only remember dreams if you wake up (a) in medias res (b) immediately after they are finished. I can attest to the plausibility of that theory, in that I can remember maybe 5% of my dreams, cuz I sleep like a log.

Getting kinda dozy now, just thinking about it.
Jan 9, 2002 6:26 PM
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The only thing i would add to this is that i am more inclined to think of Diane's reimagining of events as fantasy than dream. Although we see her in bed at the start we do not see her sleeping, merely breathing deeply. There are references to dreaming but i'm not sure how cogent they are and also i don't think it matters too much. To me dreaming is more an act of the self-concious whereas fantasy is more self-willed - what you WANT to happen that is.

Diane draws from reality, incorporating events (the drive up Mulholland Drive where she finally decides to have Camille killed) and people (the Expresso Man whom she sees while drinking the coffee, the actress that kisses Camille, Adam etc) but changing them to suit her own needs. There is certainly a a strong sub-concious part of the fantasy, however, in that i think the Ugly Man and the Cowboy are representative of her pain and her conscience respectively. Like has been said, everything that happens in her fantasy happens from the POV of Diane - Camille becomes dependant on her, it is Diane who is the talented actress everyone loves - nobody is BAD to Betty in any way. It's only when we get to Diane that people start treating her badly. It's typical revenge fantasy, switching positions of people you dislike so they experience your pain.b
Jan 10, 2002 4:34 AM
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There is, of course, the phenom of lucid dreaming, where the dreamer exercises control over the dream, directing the characters and action in order to confront his/her subconscious fears/hopes etcetera...
Jan 10, 2002 7:55 AM
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Lucid dreaming seems to be one of those new agey ideas that people like but which has no scientific support that I have ever heard about.
Jan 10, 2002 11:00 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by MindTravel
Lucid dreaming seems to be one of those new agey ideas that people like but which has no scientific support that I have ever heard about. [/QUOTE]

Doesn't require scientific support to end up in a Lynch movie, does it?
Jan 10, 2002 6:59 PM
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You're totally right on that, Dan, needs no support to be in the movie. OTOH, to my understanding, lucid dreaming means that the dreamer is aware that she (in this case) is dreaming. None of the characters ever indicate that they are aware of a dream going on. If one did, we could be a) sure it is a dream, and b) know whose dream it was. Think of how much we wouldn't have to talk to about here if that were the case.:cool:
Jan 11, 2002 2:18 PM
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