Help me solve the riddle! <<<LONG MSG, CONTAINS SPOILERS>>>

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Good movie, way better than any of Lynch's other stuff, IMO. The twist that threw so many reviewers should have been pretty straightforward--you'd think with movies like Jacob's Ladder and The Sixth Sense being so popular, it wouldn't have been much of a stretch for a reviewer to concoct a half intelligible hypothesis.

But, when I tried to do it myself, I found one gaping hole that threw my whole idea into question. If anybody can fill this hole for me, or suggest an alternate hypothesis, I'd be much obliged.

OK, my hypothesis is simple--for the first 2/3rds of the movie, they're both dead, and wandering, like ghosts. When Rita/Camille opens the blue box that they got from Silencio, she's shown the truth--the rest of the movie is a flashback to their real lives, the real events that led to both of their deaths. With this in mind, I was able to construct the following chronology, beginning with the scenes that appear in the movie AFTER she opens the box:

1. Diane and Camille are lovers. Diane is a young nobody, starstruck and in love with Camille, who's a star. Camille is the lead in this movie about some 50s pop star being made by this hotshot young director, funded by this shady consortium of producers, and she got a role for Diane as an extra. Camille is embarrassed by their relationship and tries to break up, but Diane won't hear of it.

2. They go to the party at the director's house. Camille's so embarrassed to be seen in public with Diane, she makes her enter through the "secret" entrance--coming up through the bushes to the pool. Diane realizes that Camille's a slut, sleeping with lots of other men and women, including the director and another actress (Camille II, I'll call her). Diane has a convseration with the director's mother in which it becomes clear that she's a nobody. The mother pities her. Finally, when the director announces that he and Camille are getting married, Diane snaps.

3. Meanwhile, the producers have decided they don't want Camille in the movie. In fact, they don't want her distracting their golden boy director at all. So, they decide to off her. And, as they know Diane's furious at Camille already, they decide to use Diane as a bag-girl, so they can keep their hands clean.

4. Diane's masturbating furiously and crying in her house, when the Cowboy (who is working for the producers) drops by with enough money to put a hit out on Camille. Diane then goes to the Winkie's on Sunset (where she notices the waitress's nametag saying "Betty") and pays the stoner dude (who is also working for the producers) to kill Camille. On the way out, Diane becomes "cursed" by some sort of interaction with the blue box, which is possessed by the Ugly Guy behind the Winkie's. I'm not sure if she actually picks up the blue box.

5. She goes home. The little old people in the blue box escape and freak Diane out. She's so freaked out, she gets her gun, but accidentally pulls the trigger and kills herself. She's dead. (Second to last scene in the movie.)

6. Meanwhile, Camille's on her way up to the director's house when the guys try and put the hit on her. As the hit is about to take place, the kids joyriding smash the car. But she doesn't die yet (otherwise, the cops investigating the scene would have noticed her body). Instead she walks for a long time, and ends up in the front yard of this apartment on Sunset. There, she lays down and dies.

7. Diane's afterlife/ghost world is constructed of real pieces from Diane's life, combined with lots of wishful thinking. She thinks she's "Betty" (a name she got from the waitress's nametag at the Winkie's where she hired the stoner dude to kill Camille). The two scary old people from the box become friendly passengers on her plane to L.A. Betty thinks she's staying in her aunt's beautiful apartment (Diane's aunt actually died and left her some money, which is how she got to Hollywood in the firt place). She constructs the wacky landlady from her memory of the director's mother, and even has her repeat the same line as she did when she introduced herself in scene 2: "Call me Coco, everybody does."

8. Camille's afterlife simply involves a complete loss of memory. She finds her way into the apartment where Diane/Betty's ghost is also heading. She adopts the name Rita from the poster in the bedroom. Together, the two dead lover-ghosts, with no awareness that they're dead and no memory of their real lives, begin trying to unravel the mystery of "who is Rita?" Their only clues are a bunch of money and a triangular blue key in Rita's purse.

9. They visit the Sunset Winkie's together, and Camille/Rita sees the name "Diane" on a waitress's nametag (nice parallelism of Diane constructing the name "Betty" from the same waitress's nametag in real life). This spurs a memory of a name, Diane Selwin. But both ghosts mistakenly think that Diane Selwin is Camille/Rita's real name. They look D. Selwin up in the phone book and call the answering machine. Then, in one of the best misleading scenes in the movie, Rita says, disappointed, "that's not my voice." Neither of them (and most of the movie audience is guilty of this as well) recognizes that it's Betty's voice! They decide they'll go over to this Diane Selwin person's house and see if that gives up any clue as to who Rita is. But first, Betty has a casting call she has to go to.

10. Meanwhile, the director's leading lady (and fiancée) has disappeared. So, he's having to recast her anyway. The producers decide that this other woman, Camille II, is going to be the new star. The director resists, and smashes the producers' limo with a golf club. On his way home, he finds out that the movie's been cancelled, the entire staff's been fired, and all the money in his bank account is gone. In other words, these producers have ways of making people comply with their wishes.

11. Then, in the ONLY SCENE that ruins my hypothesis, the director goes home and sees his wife screwing the pool guy. He goes downtown to check into a sleazebag motel. More explanation on why this throws such a wrench into things after I finish the hypothesis....

12. The director pays a visit to the Cowboy, who explains that they'll restart the movie and reinstate his bank account if he agrees to casting Camille II. He'll have complete control over every aspect of the movie except the casting of Camille II, which is mandatory. The director, being a smart guy, agrees.

13. Meanwhile, in her fantasy afterlife, Betty has an incredible audition in a casting call for some small-budget movie. A bigtime casting director in the room realizes that Betty has got star power, and decides to take her over to the set of the big-budget movie that the director's making.

14. Camille II comes for her audition. While she's auditioning, the director looks over her shoulder and sees Betty?actually Diane's ghost. At this point, we're not aware why he's looking at her with such open-mouth look of awe, we think he's in love. In fact, he's terrified, he knows she's dead and realizes he's seeing her anyway. At the same time, he hires Camille II, so the producers will get off his back.

15. Before Betty can meet the director in person, she remembers that she left Rita stranded at home, and they were supposed to be going to this mysterious Diane Selwin's house. Now, in real life this move definitely wouldn't make sense--you're going to throw your career away for some woman you've just met? But, this is a fantasy, and while Diane/Betty's ummistakable talent is a component of this fantasy, it's not the main point of it. So, the two ghosts visit Diane's dead body together, but neither of them recognize that it's Betty herself.

16. Finally, the two ghosts consummate their love. Rita says to Betty "I'm in love with you," thereby realizing Diane/Betty's biggest fantasy. Now, under the Hollywood literature school of ghosts, when a ghost's purpose is realized, they no longer have to wander the earth. But she's not actually done yet?she has to make Camille/Rita realize what happened to her as well.

17. After they fall asleep, Rita wakes up and, based on some fragment of a memory, decides that they have to go to a club called Silencio. Betty agrees because she thinks it'll give another clue as to who Rita is. They go and experience a typical Lynchian freakshow, but with an important underlying theme: "Everything you're experiencing right now is an illusion!" Little do they know how true that theme is to their situation!

18. Silencio is actually a way station for the afterworld, presided over by the Blue-Haired Lady. The Ugly Guy behind the Winkie's works for her as well. So, now, the blue box appears in Betty's purse. The two ghost lovers return home, and Rita finds that the blue triangular key fits into the box. Betty disappears: she has accomplished her purpose as a ghost, both by realizing her biggest fantasy (having Camille/Rita declare her love) and by guiding Camille/Rita to enlightenment. Camille/Rita puts the key in the box, and everything becomes clear to her.

19. The blue-haired woman at Silencio says "Silencio," signifying that these ghosts are finished and can pass into true death, which is silence.

Pretty cool, huh? The only problem with this neat wrapper is scene 11. The trouble is, in scene 2, the director is talking about the events in scene 11! His wife's already gone, he says, wittily, "I got the pool, she got the poolman." And, of course, his wife's gone, otherwise he wouldn?t be able to declare that he's getting married to Camille!

There were a couple of gratuitous red herrings as well, leftovers, I'm sure, from when this was going to be a pilot to a TV show. What was in the black book that the stoner guy got from the long-haired loser in the scene where he kills him? Why do we have to introduce the blue box and the Ugly Guy with two characters in the Denny's who are completely peripheral to the rest of the film? We'll never know. Personally, I'm glad this wasn't a TV show because I don't have cable and I probably would have resisted renting the entire series on video, as I've done with Twin Peaks to this day.

Can anybody resolve my problem???
Oct 14, 2001 11:56 AM
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The biggest riddle here is why I sat through the entire movie. It can best be described as sloooow, uneventful, and just plain boring for the first two-thirds of the film. Only the final third was mildly interesting - and that does not mean it made any sense. What's the point, anyway?
Oct 14, 2001 7:18 PM
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General Theory on Mulholland Drive

The turning point in the movie is definently the "Silencio" scene. The maestro keeps telling us about the workings of an illusion and perception. How everything is based on perception. He?s basically telling us what the movie rotates around. At this point Betty begins crying and then shaking violently. Is she waking up? Is she realizing that she is currently living in an illusion. She finds the blue box in her bag.....is it her mind? Is it time for her to leave her fantasy behind? The movie then does a 180 when Camilla opens the box with the blue key. The camera is sucked into the box (perhaps betty's mind) and we see Diane laying on her bed. The Cowboy passes by a couple of times telling her to wake up. She does. To me, these are very important scenes, signifying the transition from the illusion, to the reality.

My general feeling about the movie is that the first half is Diane's fantasy world.....what she wishes she could have. The beginning of the movie starts with an odd dreamlike dance scene. The interesting thing about this scene is that a projection of a happy Betty with the two elders begins getting projected over the scene. Has her dream begun? The rest of the first half shows Betty as having all the talent and leading Camilla around. The director is having a horrible time, and Coco is just a land owner.

When Betty comes back to reality. Camilla is a huge star who is getting married to the successful director, whose mother is Coco. Betty is now just a leech. Living off of Camilla's roles looking for a stardom that will never come. She also is in love with her.....but Camilla never returns the love....she's basically obsessed with Camilla. In the first part of the movie Betty and Camilla are very close sexually, physically, and relationship wise. This is her fantasy....she wishes Camilla would love her like that. The fantasy sequence (The first half) is most likely the way Betty wished things were.

Not ghosts, but maybe ?Dreamers? sit down to meet in ?Silencio? to begin waking up. It is obvious the first part is some type of illusion.

Betty would want Camilla to get amnesia, because if Betty got it, she would forget about her ego, and forget about everything else, and start anew with Betty. And they would be able to start a new loving relationship. In Betty?s fantasy, she was able to bring herself to tell Camilla that she loved her. This is a fantasy though, maybe the real Betty wouldn?t have the guts to say something like that. Therefore it was in Betty?s dream. If Camilla forgot who she was, then she would have more time to spend with Betty and she wouldn?t be seeing the director and whoring herself around. It is very much so a love story.

Overall: The first half of the movie is Betty/Diane's dream/illusion/fantasy. The second half is of her either physically or symbolically waking up from her beautiful dream, and coming back to her horrible reality.

The movie sort of represents Hollywood. First you see the glamorous dream?.but when you dig deeper you see the horrible reality of it all. The hidden evils that lay beneath the glamorous image.
Oct 14, 2001 8:44 PM
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I have been a fan of David Lynch's for many years, so when I heard he was going to take his ABC rejected pilot and fashion it into a film, I was excited. Coming off the tractor heels of The Straight Story, Lynch is again in top form with this film. I have no idea what the general public will think of this, for there is no real explanation for anything that happens in this film, like a dream or a surrealist's painting--but like any work of art, there are threads.
Due to the fact that the closest place playing this film is 90 minutes north of me, I had plenty of time reflecting on it on the way home. This is my "interpretation," only because I wanted to see if my mind could even try to rationize the goings on in this film. Granted there will be flaws, due to the fact that this is not a typical murder mystery where all the threads come together, but I will try my best. Apologies to Mr. Lynch for trying to solve this film on the way home instead of letting it live on in my subconsious as a waking dream.
I feel "Betty" has always been Diane and her and Camille are in a relationship coming to its end. She knows Camille is seeing this young director and this bothers her (almost as much as Fred Madison in Lost Highway). Diane makes a sexual plea for Camille to stay with her and she is rejected, so she ultimately arranges for Camille to be murdered with the assassin at the restaurant, subsequentially she reads the name, "Betty" on a waitress's uniform.
In order to get away with this murder, Diane arranges with her aunt to stay at her apartment; hence the neighbor saying Diane has not been in her apartment in a while. When the murder plot goes astray and Camille staggers her way towards Diane's aunt's apartment (closest refuge), she wanders into the apartment and is full of questions, suffering from amnesia.
Diane walks in and discovers Camille not knowing who she is, and since Camielle has now adopted a new identity "Rita," Diane thinks they can start over, until the name, "Mulholland Drive," flows from Camielle's lips. Diane knows that Camille is working this situation out in her subconsious and perhaps Diane can lead her back into loving her.
Because Camielle was involved with the director, who at one point acknowledges that his wife is sleeping with the pool man (which explains why he isn't upset at the pool man in the scene where he confronts them; he already knows and takes his anger out on his wife's jewelery), she was going to star in his new film. Her disappearance makes it ripe for sinister happenings to take place at the highest levels of studio politics.
Camille shows Diane that she has a ton of money in her purse, and the director finds out from his secretary that he is now broke. I think Diane and Camille wanted to rip off the director initally, but it became an affair of the heart and now we are left with a blond, a brunette, amnesia and a lot of money.
When Diane goes to the audition, she acts not at all innocent that she wants everyone to think--followed by the scene where she visits Camille's ex boyfriend (the director)'s set where at first one thinks he is in awe of her, but in reality he knows Camille has disappeared and here is her freaky ex girlfriend on his set. She gets out of there really quick when she realizes where she is.
I feel ultimately Diane made a deal with the devil where she got away with a murder, an audition, a reconcilition with her ex girlfriend, a neighbor who doesn't recogize her--but in the end, when it all comes down to it, the devil came after her and scared her so much, she had no choice but to take her own life.
This is my interpretation, but like a true fan, I let this film live on in my mind and heart as a true document as to what cinema can do.
Silencio.
Oct 14, 2001 10:46 PM
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Since this is a thread for people who have already seen the film, I'll reluctantly put in my two cents. Please don't read if you haven't seen the film.

There are no supernatural elements in the film. The rich, symbolic, stylistic details of the first two-thirds all stem from the fact that we are seeing it through Diane's feverish mind (possibly as she sleeps, or possibly while awake but in a near-mad frenzy of fantasy in order to cope with her unbearable reality).

The plot elements that make up the first two-thirds of the film are constituted from Diane's memory of the past, which are transformed, embellished and even inverted in her mind. One simple example of course is the hitman's signature blue key, which turns into the mystically shaped key of the blue box.

The "reality" that she is responding to is delivered in the final stage of the film (after the blue box is opened). We see Diane's true life: she is an unsuccessful actress, dumped by her lover Camilla in favor of a successful director (and possibly other female conquests); and Diane -- distraught with erotic longing, rage, envy, loneliness -- has murdered her through the hiring of a contract killer.

A lot of the thrill of the film for me comes from recalling the details of the first two thirds of the film and appreciating the psychological necessesity that makes Diane reconstruct the story the way she does. The details ring so true psychologically: Diane's fantasy, and the film, starts with the wish that the murder could be undone, that Camilla not only survive the hit but emerge as a beautiful amnesiac blank page that can love her all over again; Diane herself is reconstructed, with a new name "Betty" appropriated from the clean and healthy diner waitress, into a wholesome, massively talented up-and-coming actress; the powerful young director who stole her girlfriend is reduced to a comical slapstick figure, all his power (temporarily) stripped from him; the girl whom Diane saw at the party as Camilla's new lover is transformed to the "It" girl of a fantasy film, stealing the big part in that film in much the same unfair way as Diane sees her "win" Camilla's affections. And there are many more such examples; seen from Diane's feverish perspective, they fit into place with a horrible beauty.

Diane's fantasy/dream begins to tatter and turn to nightmare as the unbearable truth starts to pierce through. Ultimately, Diane becomes prisoner to her own nightmare; she is like the man we saw in one of the earliest scenes who describes his own nightmare and then finds that he is living it (Diane conceives this scene too, having momentarily noticed this stranger witnessing her as she hired the hitman). She can't undo the murder, she can't reverse the past, she can't make Camilla love her or make herself innocent. And this leads to her own death.

Heavy stuff. Lots of amazing metaphors to Hollywood as a dream factory. But for me, most powerful as a (basically simple) psychological thriller.
Oct 15, 2001 12:56 AM
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There is nothing to solve. The movie starts out promising, building on characters, building a story,and then it ends with nothing at all making sense. There is nothing to solve! That is the whole point of the movie.
This isn't Memento (A great movie that you can solve). This a poorly written train wreck, well at least the last hour of it.
Oct 15, 2001 8:11 AM
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Exactly Oxfordian, that's the way I interpeted the film also. Read my theory in this topic....our theories are very similar.
Oct 15, 2001 10:51 AM
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Movie God, didn't you just read Oxfordian's explanation?

Oxfordian, I agree with all you said - your thoughts about the movie mirror mine. The power of the film is that we learn about Diane not through everyday events but through her dreams and fantasies. A wonderful though very depressing film. The most poignant psychological study of a suicide that I've ever seen.

If I can phrase your thoughts in another way so that others can perhaps understand better: The bits and pieces we see in the last third are the seeds that build the dream-fantasy we saw in the first two-thirds. Also, it is more realistic in a mystery to not fully explain all strands. As in real life not all strands resolve to a conclusive end.

As for the blue box, I don't think a full explanation is needed but I think the contents of the box directly relate to Diane's death. I didn't fully understand how she caused her death - she appeared to have some device on her mouth. The box contained either some drug that she inhaled on her death-bed or some powder she placed on the fire - but there's so much more to the movie that it doesn't matter much to me.

The best movie I've seen in a very long time.
Oct 15, 2001 11:17 AM
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Some more to add...

I thought the entire dream-fantasy section of the movie was Diane's thoughts/dreams while she was on the bed dying. In other words, she lies down to die and the whole first part of the movie is her last dream.


The grinning elder couple at the start was the movie (Lynch) telling us that what we were about to see was not real. It's like they had a big secret to hide.
Oct 15, 2001 11:28 AM
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There were a couple of gratuitous red herrings as well, leftovers, I'm sure, from when this was going to be a pilot to a TV show. What was in the black book that the stoner guy got from the long-haired loser in the scene where he kills him.

The Black Book means nothing. It was just a seed for one her dreams. In real life, Diane sees the "mysterious" book in the diner. When she dreams on her death bed, her mind just makes a little amusing dream out of it, that's all. The whole first part is a collection of dreams inspired by everyday events that are revealed in the second part.
Oct 15, 2001 11:32 AM
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Glad to hear from Robo and Awfultin and any others who share my wavelength on this.

As for the blue box...

I think the blue box does not exist in the real world, only in Diane's dreamworld. Diane conceives of it based on the hitman's little blue key, which he delivered as a message that he completed the murder.

Remember that Diane imagines the fanciful fantasy version of the blue key earlier on, well before the box is seen, when she and Rita/Camilla open the bag of money looking for her identity. The blue box appears later as a psychological continuation of the blue key: some awful locked secret.

And the blue box manifests itself at a peak in her emotional trauma, while the two women listen to the spanish singer perform "Crying." With her love and loss and anguish at its peak, she can no longer suppress the truth of what has really happened, and that truth is inside the box. The box appears in the theatre, and soon Diane herself disappears out of the the fantasy-world, just before Camilla is about to open the box. Once Camilla opens it, the hopeful fantasy is extinguished.

We don't see the blue box again until near the end of Diane's madness, when it appears in the custody of the monster-like vagrant (some kind of Id/Evil figure?), and when the box releases the two tiny elderly Furies that will drive Diane over the edge.

As for Diane's death, I think there is enough ambiguity to suggest different possibilities. It is possible she dies in her sleep (like the diner man who seems to have a heart attack upon seeing his nightmare vision). When I first saw the movie, I assumed she really shot herself in her panic to rid herself of the unbearable thoughts crowding in on her (along with the simultaneous pounding on her apartment door of the detectives closing in).

Cheers,
oxfordian3
Oct 15, 2001 11:51 AM
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Yeah, I've only seen it once and had horrible front row seats - I'll probably get a slightly different impression the second time through. I can't wait until this comes out in DVD!
Oct 15, 2001 12:00 PM
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I'm glad I've found people that have come to the same conclusions that I have.

I actually could have sworn that she shot herself...I didn't think she died in her sleep. Also, here are some interesting tidbits I noticed:

The begining sequence of the film (With the swing dancing) feels almost as if a dream is begining. Then, oddly enough, a blurry picture of Diane and the elderly couple gets projected over the dancers a few times, thus signifying the begining of the dream.

Also, the Silencio scene is probably one of the most important in the movie. It basically explains to the audience what is happening. "We hear the band play, yet there is no band". He says: "It's all an illusion". These are some EXTREMELY important lines pertaining to the film, recognizing Diane's illusion.

The last sequence I find to explain a lot is when the blue box has been opened, and we see Diane laying on the bed. The Cowboy walks past her doorway many times....telling her to WAKE UP. This whole sequence feels very much like waking up from a dream. There are sometimes symbolism in dreams to let you know when you are waking up. Then, she does. She comes back to her reality...the very one she was tryng to escape from.

It's such a beautiful and brilliant movie. Very sad though....tragic.
Oct 15, 2001 1:48 PM
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I love how everybody who hates this movie just goes on and on about how it was a failed pilot and then got extended into a movie..c'mon, he's not that stupid.

i liked your interpretation.

I couldnt make sense out of the movie at all when i saw it, and as time goes on, it just gets more interesting to try and make sense out of it.

I am resisting seeing it again...I almost like watching everybody's reactions more than watching the film !!
Oct 16, 2001 3:46 PM
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I agree that, though making of the film has an unusual history, Lynch was very smart and built a solid work of art in the end.

I also think that the film stands on its own now, and there's no reason to invoke the way it was created. It is certainly possible to look on the looser threads, as it were, and dismiss them as just part of the pilot version. But the critical threads all fit together like clockwork. And once the basic simple plot is assembled, the more peripheral threads all work as well; in fact they start to become intriguing to me when I consider their psychological roots.

As just one example of a peripheral thread, I can see why Diane would conceive of the Cowboy figure (one reviewer called him "dessicated" - I like that): for an unhappy actress who has been ground down by the Hollywood engine, who is dreaming a fantasy which includes the foiling of a hot-shot, young, male glib film director (whose real-life counterpart stole her girlfriend), what better Hollywood icon can she imagine than a stoic movie Cowboy from the past to come and blow her rival out of the water?

I do plan on seeing the movie one more time, though. It won't be the same disorienting ride as the first viewing, but I'll maybe catch the details a bit more.

-oxfordian
Oct 17, 2001 11:15 AM
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At first I too thought it was 'all just a dream.' Solid theory, though I think a little too simple for Lynch. I agree with the ghost/afterlife theory. If you remember at the very beginning of the film, the camera, from first person point of view Diane, stumbles into her bedroom and falls on her bed (notice the red sheets - proving this is Diane). She sees the cowboy (for the second time) and she has "done bad" according to him. She promptly kills herself, wanders Purgatory with Camille (who has also been killed) until their love is completely consummated (verbally and physically). At Silencio their spirits are allowed entrance into the afterlife. They are free of each other. That's why Diane vanishes in the bedroom. She is free of Camille and vice versa.
Oct 17, 2001 3:16 PM
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The ghost theory is interesting, I just don't agree with it. I think Lynch uses the symbolism to show the emotions of his characters and the plot. I really don't think it's supernatural. I think it's one of the most down to earth stories about Hollywood. Just told in a brilliant way.
Oct 17, 2001 5:38 PM
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Interesting theories on MD. However, keep in mind that Lynch wrote this and shot it to be a pilot episode of a series. Because of this, I can't believe that the first part of the movie, which was shot for the pilot, was just a dream sequence, because that means that the rest of the series would have to be a dream which I find a little hard to believe. Try this theory on for size...
The second part of the movie (post-Silencio) was an explanation of what happened prior to the car crash. Since Lynch knew that he wasn't going to be able to make several more episodes, he decided to show us what happened before the crash. Because dreams are a big part of his works, I think that Camilla/Rita had a revealing dream after seeing Diane dead in bed. Her memory is represented by the blue box, and when she opens the box, her memory comes back. Now that Betty is Camilla's lover, Camilla projected Betty into the role of Diane, Camilla's former lover. Explaining this in a more linear form, Diane(the one found dead in bed) and Camilla had a relationship, but Diane was growing more and more obsessed while Camilla was growing closer to her boyfriend, the director(name?). Diane was driven to the director's party and upon hearing the wedding announcement, was so jelous that she wanted Camilla dead. The Hitman and the Limo drivers were working together, with the possibly splitting the kill money. Maybe they wouldn't kill Camilla unless they had the money and that is how the money got in the limo. Camilla was on her way to seeing the Director when the hit was going to be made. All was going according to plan until the accident. Diane, grief-stricken from her decision to have Camilla killed, killed herself, which is where the body in the bed in the first part of the movie came from.
Two things that I can't confirm until I see it a second time: the dead woman in the bed, Diane Selwick, and the singer at Silencio were the same person. Can anyone confirm this? In that sense, when the Silencio singer passed out(?) and was dragged away, Betty took her place in this story.
Also, Coco looked at Camilla suspiciously in the beginning of the movie, like she recognized her as her son's girlfriend.

By the way, is Diane Selwick Agent Cooper's Diane?
Oct 17, 2001 7:16 PM
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Interesting theories on MD. However, keep in mind that Lynch wrote this and shot it to be a pilot episode of a series. Because of this, I can't believe that the first part of the movie, which was shot for the pilot, was just a dream sequence, because that means that the rest of the series would have to be a dream which I find a little hard to believe. Try this theory on for size...
The second part of the movie (post-Silencio) was an explanation of what happened prior to the car crash.


It's possible that the movie is nothing like what the series was supposed to be. In the movie though, the car crash scene was definitely something Diane dreamed up because of its similarities with the scene where Diane goes to the Director's party. That real life scene acted as a seed for the dream she later had.
Oct 18, 2001 5:54 AM
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Posts: 3
I'll buy that theory, Robo. After learning that the series would not be happening, Lynch could have taken it in a totally different direction. However, I didn't think that there were that many similarities in the two limo scenes. Obviously they were both in the same limo, probably the studio's, and they were both on their way to the director's house. Keep in mind that before the accident, Camilla seemed pretty tough. Not at all like she was after the accident, but similar to her personality post-Silencio. I also think that there were many more "supernatural" occurences in the second part of the film (the miniature old people, apartment changes, etc.), indicating that post-Silencio was the dream.
Oct 18, 2001 7:05 AM
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