The solution to MD

Original Poster
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 342
MD is all about Adam and his fantasies, involving women. Lynch is much more abstract in his art than a mere soap story of love and fall would indicate.

At www.mulhollanddrive.com, it's Adam's fragmented picture that we have to try to piece together.

That MD is a male story is documented in the inital diner scene, where it's a man's worried mind that is dealt with, not a woman's.

The two dreams that lead to death are the same two instances that will lead Adam to see the Cowboy again.

Adam's first dream is about his autonomy as a director, the second one about finding the love of his life. In both cases he makes the wrong decision, losing his autonomy and engaging with a femme fatale. A male tragedy.

The girls, Betty, Camillia etc., are the girls of his life that he gets all mixed up and confused about, mistaking their names and identites. They may also represent the app. five choices for the leading role of his movie, i.e. his life.

His "This is the girl"-statement is of course to be taken more literal than just concerning a part in a movie.

Take a look at the poster. Who is driving on MD with the girls shining down on the road like stars from the sky ? Adam of course - or is it Lynch himself ?

I was partly inspired by http://members.aol.com/Heloise6899/drive.htm. Thanks, Timothy!






PS. As will appear, I was forced to dismiss my earlier female split persona-theory during a 10 day stay in Greenland.
Oct 22, 2002 5:59 PM
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Your link did not work ...
Oct 22, 2002 8:13 PM
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I know. Just remove the final dot after htm from the adress line and it's there.
Oct 23, 2002 4:18 AM
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Is that your site?
Oct 23, 2002 7:25 AM
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No, mine is www.caraten.subnet.dk which is in Danish, though the links are mostly international.

Presently, the quote on the site is actually a Lynch quote about reality though it doesn't say so.

Feel free to write the guestbook, if you can find it.
Oct 23, 2002 8:17 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by ID-ea
PS. As will appear, I was forced to dismiss my earlier female split persona-theory during a 10 day stay in Greenland. [/QUOTE]
before we go any further......

<i>tell us what happened in Greenland</i>.
Oct 23, 2002 11:50 AM
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Of course you can never be certain, when it comes to a Lynch movie. Most of his previous works, however, are male stories or male tragedies, like Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet and Lost Highway.

As for MD, it is remarkable that in both 'parts' of MD, Adam's character is about the only one that stays constant, as Timothy points out in his contribution. Every other character changes.

Adam is associated with cars, both his own and the one his is trying to destroy. The 'drive' symbol is attached to him, both in a mechanical and a freudian sense. The women are merely being driven (in cars, taxis etc.).

Also the color pink is associated with Adam, both in his pouring pink paint over his wife's jewelry (= genital association) and getting his clothes pink afterwards. The pink background that starts and ends MD may therefore well be his.

Lynch uses a lot of conventional visual symbols in MD. Apart from the one already pointed out, the tunnel vision, he uses glass and glass doors as a symbol of distance and the suitcase/purse/box etc. as a symbol of the vagina. The mirror is of course classical.

It would be difficult to contribute the purely sexual symbols to a lesbian romance, since they originate from the male conception of female sexuality, but of course it's possible.

The only difference between Adam and Fred in Lost Highway is that Adam actually catches his wife red-handed being unfaithful. The stories of Adam and Pete in Lost Highway are, almost identically, the impossible wish to possess the woman, though Adam's wish is only just implied.

Even his name smells of original sin.

It's the story of the man and the woman again.

Who knows, maybe the lesbian scenes are Adam's own fantasy running wild.

I'll leave it to the learned critics of the future if my interpretation is correct. The critics are still arguing whether Hitchcock's The Birds is an oedipal story, which I undoubtedly think it is.
Oct 24, 2002 3:17 AM
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Holy guacamole.

ID-ea IS Justin Theroux.
Oct 24, 2002 5:54 AM
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Surprised, Rochas, or just plain flabbergasted ?
Oct 24, 2002 6:49 AM
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Jealous, mainly.

You better not get involved in any three-way love scenes in the upcoming "Nowhere To Go But Up" with Audrey Tautou and Jenna Lamia, or I'll be obliged to post those images of you drowning puppies in that critically-panned off-Broadway performance-art disaster you presided over back in 1986; titled "Sid the Sychotic Submerger."

You puppy killer.
Oct 24, 2002 7:14 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by ID-ea
Of course you can never be certain, when it comes to a Lynch movie. Most of his previous works, however, are male stories or male tragedies, like Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet and Lost Highway.[/quote]

That builds as big a case for a change as it does support your theory ...


As for MD, it is remarkable that in both 'parts' of MD, Adam's character is about the only one that stays constant, as Timothy points out in his contribution. Every other character changes.

And Coco changes how?

Adam is associated with cars, both his own and the one his is trying to destroy. The 'drive' symbol is attached to him, both in a mechanical and a freudian sense. The women are merely being driven (in cars, taxis etc.).

Woman: "Some men don't like to be driven."
Bond: "No, some men don't like being taken for a ride."

Thunderball

Also the color pink is associated with Adam, both in his pouring pink paint over his wife's jewelry (= genital association) and getting his clothes pink afterwards. The pink background that starts and ends MD may therefore well be his.

Correction. Blue like the color of the Blue Lady's hair opens and closes the movie. Would it be fair to call it a pinkish blue? Yes. Would it be fair to call it a bluish pink? No. Technically speaking the background to end the movie is the decidedly Red Curtain (Lynchism).

There many other references to pink in the movie. Since waitress Betty/Diane is wearing a pink shirt does that make the movie about her? Or are you saying the waitress is just a big penis?

Lynch uses a lot of conventional visual symbols in MD. Apart from the one already pointed out, the tunnel vision, he uses glass and glass doors as a symbol of distance and the suitcase/purse/box etc. as a symbol of the vagina. The mirror is of course classical.

The mirror means many things to many people, what does it mean to you?

It would be difficult to contribute the purely sexual symbols to a lesbian romance, since they originate from the male conception of female sexuality, but of course it's possible.

I'll leave that comment/issue to others.

The only difference between Adam and Fred in Lost Highway is that Adam actually catches his wife red-handed being unfaithful. The stories of Adam and Pete in Lost Highway are, almost identically, the impossible wish to possess the woman, though Adam's wish is only just implied.

Even his name smells of original sin.

It's the story of the man and the woman again.

Who knows, maybe the lesbian scenes are Adam's own fantasy running wild.


Interesting.

I'll leave it to the learned critics of the future if my interpretation is correct. The critics are still arguing whether Hitchcock's The Birds is an oedipal story, which I undoubtedly think it is.

Or you can leave it to us to muck it around. It just seems to me that most of your arguments are one dimensional. Adam drives a car therefore he is in control. Adam's face is on some web site so it is a clear tip of his importance .. etc. etc.

Let me put it another way - if I wrote that the woman are in control because they are the ones being chauffered by non-important/barely visible lackeys ... what would you say? My point being it is very easy to build a case on one's observation, but it might build just as good a case for another theory.

Creative thoughts and ideas are always encouraged! Besides, it is hard to discount someone that uses the word 'oedipal.'
Oct 24, 2002 8:32 AM
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ctyankee,

I know it's an unelaborated and one-dimensional theory yet.

What left me questionning the world-wide theory of the fallen Diane reconstructing a dream world and a dream figure, Betty, was partly Timothy's arguments as well as the fact that, arrogantly enough by me, that if the whole world seems to have understood a Lynch movie just like that, they didn't.

Maybe I am wrong and the story has three dimensions at the same time: Adam's, Diane's and Camilla's.

But for all Lynch's many layers and worlds, his works tend to come down fairly one-demensional at the end. Fred turning into Pete is a classical male transition made in order to gain control over the female and his own emotions, but the control plan breaks down for Pete (as it does for anybody). He can never have her. Possession-stuff turned sour. Control spelled backwards in Danish spells 'enough ****'.

Coco changes from a landlady to Adam's mother, I guess.

The question is not what the mirror means to me, but what it means in general film theory or to perhaps Lynch, if he should choose use it differently. Traditionally, I think it's a symbol of narcissism/doubled personality, and a broken mirror is a broken personality.

Come on, enlarge my theory rather than discourage it. We may end up in a University paper no one reads.

The only thing I presided over in 1986 was my own ego. I was 22.
Oct 24, 2002 2:43 PM
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I guess I have faith in the fact that people grow and can become more multi-dimensional. Certainly, it was true for Hitchcock as he got in his prime.

Good point about Coco, I wasn't thinking about her role when I made that comment. However, why do we assume that Adam's role is the same. What specifically makes us believe that he is a director in real life/party scene?

I'm perhaps a little distracted tonight, what is the connection with 1986?
Oct 24, 2002 5:12 PM
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Tristan,

It is http://www.mulhollanddrive.com

ID probably put an extra dot at the end ...

There is a place to play the game and then go to the phone booth to input the code ...

Adam is one of three faces ... if I'm not mistaken ...
Oct 24, 2002 7:33 PM
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"The film then switches to a scene where a young Jewish man called Dan is talking to his shrink in a diner."

How do you know Dan is Jewish and why is this relevant to your analysis?

jk
Oct 24, 2002 7:58 PM
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