Robert Forster's explanation of the film

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I was volunteering at Roger Ebert's Overlooked Film Festival over this past week and Robert Forster, who is in MD, was on hand for his movie Diamond Men. After the movie, Forster got on stage and was answering questions from people in the audience. MD came up. He said that he got this information straight from the producers of the film and here is what he knows for sure to be true. There was a girl from the midwest who came to Hollywood and wanted to be an actress. She failed at that. She tried to be a waitress and failed at that. She fell in love with a girl and failed at that too. She decides to shoot herself and in the moment between shooting herself and before her head hits the pillow, she goes into a dream where everything is the way that she wished it would have been.

I've tried to give the words as Robert said them and I hope that it all makes sense. I know this is the story that I always believed and now I got the information from someone in the movie.
Apr 28, 2002 2:15 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by hayworth46
He said that he got this information straight from the producers of the film and here is what he knows for sure to be true.[/QUOTE]

But we all know producers are notoriously full of it. ;)
Apr 28, 2002 3:14 PM
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Yeah, I agree it is about failure, and about Diane's dream of how it couldhave/should have been, but not necessarily when the dream happened or anything else. Producers are full of it.

And also, by the way, Diane/Betty is from Deep River, Ontario. That's in Canada, not the midwest.

Apr 28, 2002 4:01 PM
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I just put down what he said. Take it as you will.
Apr 28, 2002 4:03 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by hayworth46
He said that he got this information straight from the producers of the film and here is what he knows for sure to be true. There was a girl from the midwest who came to Hollywood and wanted to be an actress. She failed at that. She tried to be a waitress and failed at that. She fell in love with a girl and failed at that too. She decides to shoot herself and in the moment between shooting herself and before her head hits the pillow, she goes into a dream where everything is the way that she wished it would have been.
[/QUOTE]

Too bad her dream (2/3 of the movie) felt like an episode of Matlock.
Muddying an utterly conventional narrative doesn't make it profound.
Apr 28, 2002 9:35 PM
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Since things in the dream did not turn out the way she wished it to be, it would seem that this is just one mans opinion and not a well thought out one at that.
Apr 28, 2002 9:42 PM
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well everyone also knows that her dream even fails her. but it started out being how she wanted it to be.
Apr 28, 2002 9:47 PM
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If she shot herself before the dream, why in the dream is she in a different position on the bed, have different clothes on and not have the gun in her mouth?
Apr 28, 2002 10:55 PM
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to me it seems as if she is creating a vision of "someone else" so that it will not remind her that "she" is the one who is dying or dead. these smaller details robert did not explain, so in answering your question i used my own insight.
Apr 29, 2002 7:12 AM
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Why is it that when she kills herself she never puts her head on the pillow?

Hayworth,

I mean no harm in picking apart Forster's and your opinion. I had exactly the same view the first time I saw it. After more screenings I came to realize that the dream comes before the suicide.

Robert Forster was not even in the film, just the TV pilot. In the TV pilot Betty was not Diane Selwyn, Diane did not commit suicide, there was no dream etc. Lynch refused to tell the principals in the film, Naomi, Laura and Justin or anyone else what was going on. Only Lynch and probably Mary Sweeny know what was intended and they are obviously not talking.

It's great that you have your vision of what the film means and it's nice that someone (Forster) agrees with you but you two just have join the rest of us with differing opinions.
Apr 29, 2002 10:37 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by richdubbya
Robert Forster was not even in the film, just the TV pilot. [/QUOTE]

Richard,

Robert Forster was the dark-haired cop at the scene of Rita's accident.
Apr 29, 2002 10:44 AM
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yes he was in the film. i know each person has slightly different views on what happened and when each thing happened. but in the beginning it shows the heavy breathing and we see the pillow etc. what made you(richdubbya) believe that she dreamed before the suicide. i'm curious.
Apr 29, 2002 10:53 AM
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I remember watching MD with a friend, and when she saw Forster she said, "I love that actor!" Then I said, "Really? Well enjoy him while it lasts, cuz that's the last you're gonna see of him." I'd like to see what Lynch would have done to develop his character.
Apr 29, 2002 10:55 AM
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please note that robert said that he had no clue about what was going on in the film for several months after he saw it. only after talking with some people from the film did he learn the story that he passed on. he made it sound like it was not "his" interpretation but an explanation from those involved in the film.
Apr 29, 2002 10:56 AM
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Cute,

I know that, that scene was filmed for the pilot more than a year before Lynch came up with the ideas to close the story. Forster was never involved after the story was concieved and did not participate in the filming of the "film" just the pilot. I hope I'm explaining this right.
Apr 29, 2002 10:58 AM
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yes that makes sense and also makes sense why robert was so confused by what he saw until it was explained to him.
Apr 29, 2002 11:00 AM
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i may be wrong, but is robert the only person affiliated with the film to actually give a "definition" of md?
Apr 29, 2002 11:01 AM
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it makes more sense that she went into the dream as she was dying because of the way that the dream just blacks out and ends when the blue box is opened, as if she died before the dream was "finished."
Apr 29, 2002 11:08 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by richdubbya
Cute,

I know that, that scene was filmed for the pilot more than a year before Lynch came up with the ideas to close the story. Forster was never involved after the story was concieved and did not participate in the filming of the "film" just the pilot. I hope I'm explaining this right.
[/QUOTE]

Richard,

Oh, of course. *slaps forehead* I hadn't thought of it from that perspective.

Thanks.;)
Apr 29, 2002 11:10 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by richdubbya
After more screenings I came to realize that the dream comes before the suicide.[/QUOTE]

I agree with that. I always thought the dream came before the suicide. In my view, she has the dream before she even sees the blue key and realizes that the job has been done (but this is debatable because we don't really know if the key was sitting on her table or not before she went to sleep). She wakes up from her dream, sees the key, thinks about things, starts to hallucinate, and then she kills herself.

Like everyone's explanations of the film, Robert Forster's view should be taken with a grain of salt. The only one who really knows what MD is about with certainty is David Lynch. The rest is all conjecture.
Apr 29, 2002 11:21 AM
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