Just one interpetation or slant on Mulholland Dr.

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Pasted from my response to another*

Actually, thanks for this perspective. Quite stimulating. That was my first intuitive leaning, but others seem to be divergent on such an idea I too was formulating towards. It makes sense. Lynch does encourage the intuitive thought/mood evoked from his works more than going from linear a to b points, I have read. So I will follow more on how it initially made me feel then reading posts that don't agree with mine; and losing confidence in how it felt/meant to me. From my first viewing, I felt like it was identity and the loss and desire of transference of identity. How many of us admire or desire to be more like someone else who is the epitome of the person we think is the perfect image we fancy/ought to be? Acting is the perfect means/channel to escape ourselves and be someone else. As in one of your interpretations, you believe Diane is not really in love with Camilla romantically and sexually at all, but more like she wanted to be her so much that it became a mistaken/obssessive lesbian love/desire, metaphorically? Yes!!? So they were never more beyond friends in reality? And Camilla was just teasing and mind-f***ing Diane? Explains why in Diane's dream, Rita desires Betty/Dianne to sleep with her -- to the efffect of: "Have you ever done this before"? And Betty replied: "No, but I want to with you. I am in love with you." Diane is jealous of and also resents Camilla for treating her like a pet project; because she is so in love with Camilla's image/persona/character that she mistaken it to be romantic love instead in the real world, perhaps. And Camilla's egotistically sadistic exhibitionism likes to have a second-rate worshipper/tag-along by her side; explains why she told Adam to let Diane stay and watch them make out; and her mocking cruelty at the party. So after Diane woke up with her eyes wide open to the awaken state of understanding her subconscious more, about her wishes/desires/motives, thus the guilt and remorse set in for having the hit done -- but you can't turn back time -- so she extinguished herself. Possessing her(having her sexually; having her body)is Diane's way of being like Camilla; to be one with and meld into her being. One of David Lynch's favorite subjective themes I suppose? That in a way sort of explains Diane's dream and Rita doning the blonde wig; so that they're like identical; the same person -- and later making love is the complete/ultimate excercise of the spiritual unison/linking of the two beings/minds in that kind of transcending mental realm. But that could not be as they are two different people -- and in reality nothing is farther from the truth so Rita makes Betty see Club Silencio; all an illusion thus revealed. In the dream, Diane wants to be the one in control, and the sole great actress; so Rita has no identity but to adopt another, hence the short blonde wig resembling Betty or the more stunning/promising Diane; and in that way, Rita became Diane and can feel, understand and cry for Diane's real pain; the rendering of transference and sharing of identity in mutual pathos/catharsis. The whole mystery of finding out Rita's identity is Diane's way of switching roles in the dream; to find Rita's (but really Diane's) lost/forgotten identity because the real Diane doesn't know who she is anymore in her desirous and disastrous obssession to be Camilla. So Betty and Rita are representations and splices of the same character inspired from the real world of Diane's perceptions; an amalgamation of who Diane used to be(in her mind) and Rita's (also Diane's) search of lost identity. Getting rid of the competition is Diane's impetus for wanting to kill the object of her desire; as she really is "dying" to be Camilla. The Cowboy is the gatekeeper or dreamkeeper of the delusional dreamer; and mediates or makes things right according to the dreamer's subconscious desires/wishes/fears. He will eventually have to wake the dreamer though. But to enter this kind of fantasy dreamworld of the subconscious you have to have been very mentally and psychologically perturbed or disturbed to have such fuel for the dreamy delusions; where you don't want to accept reality anymore, something that awful. Alas, poof... the bluebox and its keeper (the ominous fungus figure) appears! The bluebox is the gateway of inbetween reality; the entrance between and into your mind of the dream world; and understanding everything you want to know, but to enter you have to pay your toll. The blue key is that ticket in openning such insight/knowledge into your psyche, but at the price of your sanity or soul. No free show. Which Diane already paid (and not just monetary) in her descent into this temp. mad, illusory world by losing her grip with reality and putting on the hit -- this gives her qualified admittance via the blue box and key (all symbolically of course, of her temporary insanity). The blue box does not really exist, but only as an emblematic visual imagery for us. The fungus dark being is the regulator of that blue box of entering the dreamworld but then one would only exit into one's real nightmare; unleashing the old freakish couple to Dianne's disturbing demise because of her conscience eroding her sanity. There's no inbetween world in true reality. You either exit as the insane or kill yourself if you're still sane. "It" waits for people and to usher them into this madness of reality evasion/elusion/illusion. Where people no longer want to cope/live in the real world; where alternate realities converged with slivers of skewed reality of such wishful predilection/obssession of self-deceptions... sort of like why many like to take a trip/vacation from their own mind with drugs in our real world and to escape or forget responsibilities.(Not to that serious, grave degree but can be when it's out of control). Thus you can't get off that easy; you have to pay a price; your shaded reality, your sanity or your life -- and in the end, your soul. Where reality becomes illusion, illusion becomes phantasmagorical reality all merging before the curtain falls and all is silence is the wonderfully lamentable deception of the tricks for the eyes; the magic show of Silencio -- and The End. So when David Lynch called MD "A love story in the city of dreams," it's more like being in love with an image; and dreaming about having that image where Hollywood is the ripe place for dreams; reinventing yourself and your self-loathing with that than just a mere lesbian psychotic love affair, where one jilted lover goes into the deep end. It's how she got there in her mind. The mind trip that is heart-rendingly fantastical and breaks the heart and shatters the dream! To attain the desired/ideal image of yourself; that self-actualized person at what price, and can you retain who you are once you get there, that's if you even truly know or still know who you are when/if you do get there -- but is it real, or does it even exist to begin with (what that is not attainable but illusion)? What do you think? Or am I certainly off the plane? Thanks for reading such a long-ass post... whee
Jan 26, 2002 5:24 AM
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Instead of thanking people for reading your post, you should expect thanks for writing it from others! I found it very coherent and one step higher in the big picture of what this movie was about! It's very hard not to linger on some of the imagery and the literal meanings in scenes (such as Rita/Betty sleeping together meaning only that they desired one another physically, instead of Betty desiring to own Rita or meld with her and have what Rita has), and lose sight of the larger sense of things.

Wonderful post! Thanks
Jan 26, 2002 6:14 AM
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Excellent post and ideas. I disagree myself as this would disallow the part dream/part reality explaination and without this explaination the film becomes so incoherant that almost any explaination could be justified. I believe the story is much more straight forward, with some hidden meanings, but without a lot of abstract meanings. There is no wrong explaination for the film it's whatever you got personally from it that counts.
Jan 26, 2002 8:30 AM
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YES, Misslinda77, YES! You and I agree! This IS what the movie means, and exactly what I got from it too. And contrary to some others' responses here it doesn't negate the whole dream theory of the film; it's what the dream and waking life MEAN in relation to each other, and I think that others are missing this.

Extremely concise analysis which, by the way, does seem to be supported by the facts of the film. I always got the impression that Diane and Camilla were passing aquaintences, maybe even "freinds" in the way you can only be in Hollywood, but not necessarily actual lovers, which could (COULD, mind you) be Diane projecting actual experiences with her neighbor onto Camilla.
Jan 27, 2002 6:30 AM
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(got cut off)

Anyway, the film IS about desire, projkection, and the kind of identity confusion/loss you detailed so clearly. Also, symbolically, it's as if when Betty/Rita finally consumate their attraction (more like cellular than overtly sexual attraction) it's as if Rita gets the upper hand, gains all the power which then dominates the rest of the film.

ANyway, great job. It's almost eerie how similar it is to my own feelings on the matter.
Jan 27, 2002 6:36 AM
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You guys have very interesting ideas that should be explored further but I would suggest you see the film a couple more times as some of the facts don't agree with what you remember from the film: ie the blue box comes from Betty's purse not Rita's and the money is still in the Purse when Rita removes the key for the last time.
Jan 27, 2002 7:44 AM
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Meaning what, Richdubbya? I'm not arguing, I'm just not sure I quite follow you. To me this all supports the notion that Diane's personality is reintegrating, the box being from Betty'sd purse, etc. This is what happens in a dream near the end.

So all I'm saying is I don't understand.

Please clarify.
Jan 27, 2002 4:17 PM
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Ascott: I didn't mean to hurt any feelings, sorry if I did. The meaning of M.D. is open to interpetation and no one has the right or wrong take on it. I just meant that if someone wants to support their opinion with things that happened in the film they should have actually happened. My take on the film was very different when I had only seen it once then it is now. Also any interpetations are enjoyable to read and don't have be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to me or anyone else. You, Misslinda77 and Bananna are adding new welcome ideas to this forum that was beginning to lose some of it's freshness to those of us that have been here so long. If I get too technical because I know the film by heart because I have seen it so many times just tell me to shut up. You could also ask, if there is something you don't quite remember. Thanks again you "guys" for the new input.
Jan 27, 2002 6:48 PM
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(spoilers, but if you are in this thread, you probably have seen the movie, and if you haven't go away)

the first post on this particular thread(excellent, insightful post by the way) mentioned that the blue box represented inbetween reality. I don't know if I would go so far as to say some sort of limbo. I know this idea relies on the thought of Betty/Diane and Rita/Camilla being dead. And I do believe that more popular interpretation of the movie, the first half being a dream fantasy.

But a friend of mind threw a monkey wrench into whole discussion. My friend said on the second viewing that he saw Laura Palmer and Ronette Polaski in the theater(I didn't notice). So if this is true then wouldn't the theater be the equivalent of the white lodge? And of course the last shot in the film is of the theater. Has anybody noticed this? Is my friend on crack? Or is Lynch forshadowing the possibility that Rita/Camilla and Betty/Diane would be together in death? If so, how does the sequence following the suicide where Rita/Camilla Betty/Diane appear almost like angels relate to this new possibility? Is this a variation on Wagner's Tristen and Isolde? And to further complicate things, at the end of the film a blue haired lady sits in an empty theater and whispers "Silencio". If the theater is a white lodge sort of place, how does this scene fit in. And I should mention that the "Mulholland Drive Love Theme" does resemble the closing theme to Tristen and Isolde. Is this coincidence?

If there were anyway to confirm if Sheryl Lee did do a cameo in the theater, this would really expand the scope of discussion on this film.
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kdc
Jan 27, 2002 10:08 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by kdcndw
(spoilers, but if you are in this thread, you probably have seen the movie, and if you haven't go away)

the first post on this particular thread(excellent, insightful post by the way) mentioned that the blue box represented inbetween reality. I don't know if I would go so far as to say some sort of limbo. I know this idea relies on the thought of Betty/Diane and Rita/Camilla being dead. And I do believe that more popular interpretation of the movie, the first half being a dream fantasy.

But a friend of mind threw a monkey wrench into whole discussion. My friend said on the second viewing that he saw Laura Palmer and Ronette Polaski in the theater(I didn't notice). So if this is true then wouldn't the theater be the equivalent of the white lodge? And of course the last shot in the film is of the theater. Has anybody noticed this? Is my friend on crack? Or is Lynch forshadowing the possibility that Rita/Camilla and Betty/Diane would be together in death? If so, how does the sequence following the suicide where Rita/Camilla Betty/Diane appear almost like angels relate to this new possibility? Is this a variation on Wagner's Tristen and Isolde? And to further complicate things, at the end of the film a blue haired lady sits in an empty theater and whispers "Silencio". If the theater is a white lodge sort of place, how does this scene fit in. And I should mention that the "Mulholland Drive Love Theme" does resemble the closing theme to Tristen and Isolde. Is this coincidence?

If there were anyway to confirm if Sheryl Lee did do a cameo in the theater, this would really expand the scope of discussion on this film.
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kdc
[/QUOTE]

kdc,

Well, I've seen MD seven times now, and I sure don't recall seeing Sheryl Lee in the Club Silencio scene. Being a rabid Twin Peaks fan from Day 1, I can't imagine I would have missed her, if she really was in that scene.

(To be perfectly honest, I don't think I'd recognize the actor who played Ronette Pulaski.)

Anyway, sounds a bit like Urban Legend, to me. I guess that can be a "homework" assignment for the next of us to see MD (or we'll wait for the DVD)!

Regarding the last scene, I didn't make the White Lodge connection. I just saw it as a heartbreaking image of the dead Diane morphing into the image of the Monster Behind Winkie's morphing into the images of the radiant Betty and Rita superimposed over Hollywood morphing into the Club Silencio where the Blue Haired Lady murmured "Silencio" one last time.

Now, once again, my heart is breaking.
Jan 28, 2002 1:15 PM
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Hats off to Misslinda! Your analysis of MD is fascinating. I especially liked how you described the fragmentation and splicing of the personalities in the dream. The mirror scene is very similar to a scene in Bergman's "Persona"(1966). This melding or exchanging of personalities is explored in "Persona". I felt that MD was sort of paying a tribute to the Bergman masterpiece. If you've never seen it, you should check it out--you'd have a field day with it. Also, if I recall, Liv Ullmann doesn't talk at all throughout most of the movie. She's Silencio!

I tell all my friends that I could wear out a capuccino machine sitting around and discussing MD--so you're not the only one.
The more I read about and discuss the movie, the more amazing it seems. It's so wonderful to see abstraction and metaphor in a film.
Jan 28, 2002 4:03 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Misslinda77
I would love to know more about, of your (sexual/emotional)abuse theory from her grandparents (the elderly couple), you've postulated.[/QUOTE]
Um, I don't think it's fair to say that anyone "postulated" it, Miss Linda. It is a theory based upon a mountain of evidence. Check out the thread "Diane was sexually abused -- the missing link." Rich, Maitlands and myself provide overwhelming evidence to support our theory.

As far as I can tell, no one else has even attempted to provide any kind of coherent explanation for the dream events that we point out.
Jan 28, 2002 6:15 PM
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I think the sentence that reverberates through the whole movie is Rita's "I don't know who I am!" It's interesting and poignant that Betty tries to solve it as if it were a fictional detective story--with her as Nancy Drew, or even Alice in Wonderland.
The scene when they first case "Diane's" apartment has a fairy tale quality about it which I found fascinating. The apartments resembled fairy tale cottages and Rita is a dead ringer for Snow White. One of my favorite scenes is when Betty is crawling through the window--like Alice. It's like a journey into the "Heart of Darkness" that her optimism(which is not real, but part of a dream) cannot conquer. It's a wonderful visual metaphor.
It goes without saying that the setting(Hollywood)is intrinsic to the story. I also loved the scenes of Downtown LA that were used for the location of Club Silencio. It is truly an abandoned ghost town at night(I used to work there).
Jan 29, 2002 4:20 AM
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