Aren?t you always in your own dreams?

EDW
Original Poster
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 5
Aren?t you always in your own dreams? Diane is not dreaming. With that in mind, isn?t it interesting how Diane is in every scene after she is ?woken up? by the Cowboy? Most of the movie AFTER she ?wakes up? is more of a dream (hallucination, delusion, whatever) than the first three-quarters of the movie.

Mulholland Drive is a love story: ?A Love Story In The City Of Dreams?. It is the classic ?lock and key? love story.

Besides being a love story, much of the movie is a battle between good and evil. The movie hinges on Diane?s agreement with Joe, the hit man, whom is a liaison for the ?evil side?, which revolves around the Bum behind Winkie?s. The agreement is the following:
1) Diane, for the sum of money in her purse, is allowed to give up her life as a floundering actress with a broken heart. She is to come back as a bright new comer with the right connections to get either the star role of The Sylvia North Story or at least noticed by the right people. To initiate her manifestation from one life to the next, Diane must kill herself, which is assisted by Irene and ?Irene?s Companion? whom later bring her to her new life. In addition, Diane is to have no recollection of her old life.
2) Similarly, the agreement also includes a manifestation of Camilla: Diane?s former lover, biggest obstacle to Diane?s success, and the object of Diane?s desire. Diane?s motive is revenge and restitution. As Diane manifests into Betty, Camilla is to manifest into Diane. Camilla will then struggle as Diane with a miserable life and to know how it feels to be Diane (?It?s not easy for me!?).
3) The third part of the agreement involves the blue key. Joe laughs at Diane when she asks him what it opens. He knows but won?t tell her. She must figure it out for herself (as does everyone).

The first problem occurs when the assassination attempt is botched by the car accident, which is later laughed about by Ed and Joe (?An accident like that. Who could have foreseen that, man??). Joe kills Ed for failing to do what was promised and to acquire Ed?s famous black book (?the history of the world in phone numbers?). Camilla lives when she should be dead. As a result, she is midway between her life and Diane?s, which explains why Rita?s purse contains Diane?s money and the blue key. The Camilla-into-Diane manifestation had already begun. Camilla?s memory of her identity is compromised, not because of her accident, but because she is not supposed to remember who she was and doesn?t yet know who she is. This is why Rita so easily remembers the name Diane Selwyn and declares that it might be her name. Camilla?s interrupted manifestation causes a series of unexpected events. Camilla finds Betty, Diane?s new identity, as if Camilla is drawn to her (What are the odds?). Betty, an impressionable young girl from Deep River, Ontario (or is it Iowa?), commits herself to solving the mystery of Rita?s identity. Realizing she is late, Betty runs out of the audition for The Sylvia North Story because she is committed to meeting Rita. Had Camilla died like she was supposed to, Betty would have stayed and been exposed to those whom would have discovered her. Betty and Rita eventually pursue each other physically, but the two do not completely understand their attraction for each other. They touch each other in ways that seem natural as if they had done it before (perhaps in another ?lifetime?). Betty confesses not only her love for Rita but that she is IN love with her without really knowing who Rita is. Later, Rita awakes by the summoning of the Club Silencio and asks Betty to go with her. Both girls realize the truth: who Betty?s truly is, who Rita truly is, and their love for each other (perhaps a different ?lifetime?). As a result, Betty produces the blue box once the Magician disappears in a cloud of blue smoke as blue lights and the sound of thunder fill the club.

This presents the second problem: the blue key and the blue box. Theoretically speaking, when two people fall in love it is like finding a key for a lock that is otherwise impossible to open. When Joe puts the blue key where he says he will, Diane will know that the manifestation is set to begin. However, once the manifestation is complete and should the two ever find each other again, should the lock ever find its key, the entire process will reverse itself. This is why Joe laughs at Diane about what the key opens. It is also clear that after the box opens and falls to the floor Aunt Ruth comes into the room wearing exactly what she wore when she was leaving (Where is Aunt Ruth? She?s at home, because she never left). Once the box is opened, Diane ?wakes up? back to life, back to HER life, her life of misery and self-destruction. Before she makes her coffee, Diane gets a premonition that Camilla is still alive (?Camilla! You?ve come back!?). This is true because Camilla never died anyway, but Diane does not know this. Most of the final quarter of the film from this point on is Diane recalling her life leading up to her agreement with the ?dark side?. These memories include the breakup with Camilla, the dinner party, and, of course, her own suicide.

The third major problem is, once the agreement with the ?evil side? is made, the ?good side? reacts. The Cowboy is the protagonist for the ?good side? and the antithesis of the Bum behind Winkie?s. For lack of better words, the Cowboy is an angel where the Bum is a demon, and the Castigliani brothers are the liaisons for the Cowboy where Joe is the liaison for the Bum. The ?good side? manipulates Adam Kesher to RE-cast (not cast) the blonde Camilla Rhodes to thwart Adam from recasting Betty Elms through the efforts of the ?evil side?. In addition, when Diane ?wakes up?, she becomes fully aware of all of the ?good? forces that have been at work against her. The dinner party scene is a fabrication in Diane?s mind. In her world of self-defeat, Diane?s perception of the dinner party incorporates most of these ?good forces?: the Cowboy, Luigi Castigliani, and the blonde Camilla Rhodes. Diane now realizes how her plan failed.

In addition:
Who?s to say that the aunt that died and gave Diane her money was Aunt Ruth?
When Vincenzo Castigliane tells Adam Kesher that ?It?s no longer your film?, whose to say that when Adam ?does good? for the Cowboy that the film is again his and not someone else?s, like Bob Brooker?
Isn?t it interesting that it is Diane who technically sees the Cowboy twice?
Why is Betty from Deep River Ontario in the movie and from Iowa in the pilot screenplay? Does it matter?
Feb 3, 2003 12:02 PM
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What an interesting first post.

welcome EDW!

I have to say that my skills in providing an appropriate response aren't very good. However, woodlouse would probably be a better one to address this.;)
Feb 3, 2003 5:38 PM
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Sorry, it's too supernatural-cum-Faustian-elements a solution for me.

And, the good-and-evil stuff just seems too banal for Lynch.

Like debating Henry James' Turn of The Shrew or Wise's The Haunting and people begin to accept the presence of the ghosts, when in fact they are only meant to symbolize the insanity of the main character.

Further, ONCE AND FOR ALL, Diane doesn't see the cowboy twice. She sleeps the first time. I doubt that she even sees him at the party. She doesn't notice.
Feb 4, 2003 9:05 AM
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I'm not always in my own dreams but to make up for that sometimes there is more than one of me, as in dreams where I can look down and see myself or the like.

The serious dream interpreters would likely contend that *every* character in a dream represents some aspect of the dreamer and so, in a sense, everyone in the dream is the dreamer.
Feb 4, 2003 10:05 AM
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many times i'm not in my own dreams. in my last dream i was benjamin bratt riding in a car being driven by julia roberts. she stopped at a macdonalds and i told her to wait there while i walked down the street to do some detective work. but i walked in a different direction instead which led me to a front lawn where tiffani amber-thiessen was working. we talked for a while then she invited me in.
Feb 4, 2003 12:46 PM
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last night (for an example of a dream that i was in) i thought i was getting up in the morning but when i came down to the kitchen for breakfast there was my "sister" drew barrymore making breakfast for us and my late grandmother. drew said "whose turn is it today?" i asked her whose turn for what and she said "to be hated by everyone else."
Feb 5, 2003 2:40 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by peachfront
I'm not always in my own dreams but to make up for that sometimes there is more than one of me, as in dreams where I can look down and see myself or the like.

The serious dream interpreters would likely contend that *every* character in a dream represents some aspect of the dreamer and so, in a sense, everyone in the dream is the dreamer.
[/QUOTE]


Agree, and that was more or less what Sight & Sound said in their analysis.
Feb 6, 2003 5:01 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by tsiam
last night (for an example of a dream that i was in) i thought i was getting up in the morning but when i came down to the kitchen for breakfast there was my "sister" drew barrymore making breakfast for us and my late grandmother. drew said "whose turn is it today?" i asked her whose turn for what and she said "to be hated by everyone else." [/QUOTE]

i think u watch too much TV...
or maybe u forget to turn off TV at night ;)

(joking)
Feb 6, 2003 7:37 AM
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