The Money Trail Thread

Original Poster
Joined: Sep 2002
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At first it seemed like a simple goof when I noticed that there wasn't a hat in the hat box covering the purse the women put in it. Now, the whole money trail and purse shots seem more puzzling but no longer indicative of a goof. So I thought I would lay out what we see to aid future discussions.

Rita hesitantly opens her purse
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311929"

The purse is jammed packed with money
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311951">
Betty pulls down a hat box to hide the money in. Note that there is only one suitcase shown at the base of the closet with a gap to its left.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1312022">
Note the shoulder strap length of the purse. Also notice that we can't tell what time it is as DL blocks it from us.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311935">
The purse barely fits in the hat box. Rita zip the purse closed and wraps the strap around the purse and puts it in on its side. Betty puts a hat on top of it. It seems pretty clear that anyone who picks up the hat box won't believe that there is just a hat in it - and the hat is too small to fully cover the purse. Betty turns off the closet light and shuts the closet doors.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311954">
The girls rush into the apartment after coming from Club Silencio. Diane had been carrying her purse up the walkway like if she was carrying a time bomb. DL seems to be having some fun with us in this scene. He shows Betty putting her hand to the (lower) lock but she doesn't appear to have a key in her hand. We also don't hear the sound of the key entering or exiting the key hole - which we should as the audio of the door closing and their steps is very very present. Btw, another thread mentions that there is a double sound of the door closing (in error). This is not the case. The first door closing sound is that of the screen door closing before the main door.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1315349">

Other forums have posted that Betty forgets to close her handbag. Here is a shot with it wide-open. However, we lose sight of Betty before she gets into the bedroom. Since she had time to close it during this moment we have to assume that she did. Notice that she holds out her hand as if the last three fingers still contain something from our view (like the imaginary key) with two fingers extended towards the blue cube. Even though this is a quick scene, Betty holds this awkward position with her hands for several steps ... making me wonder why.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311942">
Here is Betty's purse closed as she puts the cube on the bed and disappears.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311926">
As Rita hurries into the bedroom we can make out that the closet is already opened and the closet light is on. Certainly the women could have been in the closet (literally) before going to the club. But it seems unlikely they would have left the closet open -particularly since money is hidden there. Notice also that before when we only saw one suitcase - we now see three suitcases on the floor of the closet. We can also see what time it is as the candle is not blocking the clock.

Rita pulls the purse vertically out of the hat box (i.e. it is no longer on its side) and there is no hat on top of the purse. Most importantly, the purse is not closed but is open (unzipped). Rita seems to be oblivious to this as she is busy looking towards the hallway. Notice that the strap of the bag isn't hanging down but seems caught or looped on the side facing us. It stays in that position as Rita puts the purse down to go in the hallway.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1312018">
When Rita comes back from the hallway, the purse strap is no longer looped/caught on one side but is layed out neatly on the bed. As Woodlouse had indicated in an earlier post, we can clearly see that the purse is not stuffed with money has it had been before. Clearly we don't see all of the strap in the camera shot, but (to me) it does look a little shorter than the one we saw go in the hat box. It might just be the angle.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1312011">
Here is a look at the money that Diane shows the hitman. It is certainly looks like only one stack of bills and the color of the bag looks greyer than than Rita's purse.
<img src="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/forum/attachment.php?s=&postid=1311919">
Jan 1, 2003 9:47 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by ctyankee
The purse barely fits in the hat box. Rita zip the purse closed and wraps the strap around the purse and puts it in on its side. Betty puts a hat on top of it. It seems pretty clear that anyone who picks up the hat box won't believe that there is just a hat in it - and the hat is too small to fully cover the purse.[/QUOTE]

it is a dream. to hide the money in a hat box has more to do with symbolism (hat=head=? ... memories, or rationalism, or consciousness), or even a mind-pun ( "in the box", "hat's off"...).
the fact that the money is so naively hidden shows how Betty feels safe in Aunt Ruth's apt. even if Coco is lurking, she doesnt seem to worry about someone breaking in to get the money (she makes the story in her dream, and this is not a threat to her), the key is a threat to Rita! nobody steals the money in her dream.
if she had worried about the money all dream long, searching for the best place to hide it, or changing the hidden place every second scene, then maybe the money would be an issue to her, and external forces waiting to steal her would have been the concern of her dream.
clearly the girls in the dream dont worry much about it. they dont look for where it comes from, what they will use it for ("it is probably dirty money, we shouldnt touch it"), and only ceal their silent pact by a hand shake (!)

[QUOTE]We have to assume that she took the key from her right hand and put in in her purse and closed it.
Here is Betty's purse closed as she puts the cube on the bed and disappears.
[/QUOTE]

the key? Betty took the blue box out of HER bag.
the key is in RITA's bag, with the money, in the closet.(there are 2 bags)

[QUOTE]As Rita hurries into the bedroom we can make out that the closet is already opened and the closet light is on. Notice also that before when we only saw one suitcase - we now see three suitcases on the floor of the closet. We can also see what time it is as the candle is not blocking the clock.
Rita pulls the purse vertically out of the hat box (i.e. it is no longer on its side) and there is no hat on top of the purse. Most importantly, the purse is not closed but is open (unzipped). Rita seems to be oblivious to this as she is busy looking towards the hallway.
[/QUOTE]

u want to get the prop girl fired?
seriously, i dont see no meaning in this detail that adds to the movie understanding. IMHO Lynch skips the moves necessary to get the key, as this scene must go fast and smooth to make Betty's disapearence more suspicious, and focus essentialy on the box: this is a dream ending, with all the confusion and emotion that will snap the dreamer awake.

[QUOTE]As Woodlouse had indicated in an earlier post, we can clearly see that the purse is not stuffed with money has it had been before.
Here is a look at the money that Diane shows the hitman. It is certainly looks like only one stack of bills and the color of the bag looks greyer than than Rita's purse.
[/QUOTE]

maybe the price of the hit is much less then the full load of Rita's purse... i dont think a hitman like joe, with no suit and such a lame class, charges $ 50K for one kill! people kill for 1K nowadays
besides money in dream is symbolic, and the quantity is purely abstract and fantasised, no direct link to reality (if the diner with joe is reality)
Jan 1, 2003 11:19 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by TristanLove
Also note that Betty handles the blue box in her purse/handbag like a ticking time bomb about to explode any minute and it will destroy everything - the whole illusion of the dreamworld![/QUOTE]

in the same way the bum handles the "Rubix'Cube" in the last scene: cautiously, cluelessly, unconfortably...
Jan 1, 2003 11:25 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by TristanLove
Trying to hide the money (blood money that afforded the hit to be commisioned) in a hat box under a hat is practically saying she's trying to hide/cover up the truth that the hit ever was ordered or happened. [/QUOTE]

well i am not convinced of the hit myself, but this detail got me thinking about the parallel between the diner with Joe, and the handshake with Rita.

(1) Winkie's (Diane - Joe)
-the money drops in her hands unexpectedly (aunt's inheritance) and boosts her trip to dreamland (Hollywood).
-Diane hands the money to Joe.
-Joe says this concludes the "pact".
-Joe warns Diane before taking the money.
-the blue key is the exchange for the money.
-the supposed hit is paid by this money.

(2) Aunt Ruth's (Rita - Betty)
-the money comes from nowhere (probably dirty money) but walks out of a terrible car crash unharmed and with this treasure.
-Rita hands the money to Betty who hides it.
-Handshake to conclude their loyalty/secrecy.
-no greed over money (Betty refuses the gift)
-the blue key comes with the money.
-the disapearance of Rita (and Betty) is achieved by the bluebox+key

is it a mirror of reality? an alteration of what already happened (the death of Camilla)?
or a chained event where Rita gives back the DIRTY (like the bum) money and the blue key to Betty because Diane paid her death with.
Jan 2, 2003 1:36 AM
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In the TV Pilot of MD there's a scene after the corpse is discovered where Rita gets the hat box out and offers Betty the money to continue hiding her. Betty refuses Rita's offer and the hat box is put away again. It seems to me this scene was cut from the film late on (post production?), thus explaining the missing hat and movement of the cash.... I think!
Jan 2, 2003 7:27 AM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by HarryTuttle
well i am not convinced of the hit myself

-the blue key is the exchange for the money.

[/QUOTE]

The blue key is NOT in exchange for the money, it is a token that Diane will later retrieve from a specific place (possibly a safety deposit box - that's usually how it's done) to prove that the hit has been carried out. Joe does not give Diane the key at the diner. Therefore, if Diane has the key in her possession, it is safe to say that the hit has been achieved.
Jan 2, 2003 12:00 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
The blue key is NOT in exchange for the money, it is a token that Diane will later retrieve from a specific place (possibly a safety deposit box - that's usually how it's done) to prove that the hit has been carried out. Joe does not give Diane the key at the diner. Therefore, if Diane has the key in her possession, it is safe to say that the hit has been achieved. [/QUOTE]

i understand what the scenario leads us to believe. but i am not convinced, it is a red herring to me laid by DL to introduce a crime idea in the movie. DL had probably lots of ideas for the serie he couldnt fit all in a feature film, thus the confusion of this post production collage. i think DL took the opportunity to experiment a unique narration style (given he had to use the pilot already shot) where dream and reality mess up and characters have double life.

i meant all we have is this key on the table to make us believe Camilla is dead! this is a clever visual hint actually, if the hit happened but:
1)- the "hitman" (only described as a hitman in Diane's dream! what proof is that?) never mentions to kill anybody. (i know good criminals never commit themselves with direct agreement)
2)- Diane only says: "This is the girl" showing Camilla Rhodes picture. Could have been to spy on her, or to find her ("the girl is missing"), or even to give her a message after Diane's death.
3)- we never see the body of Camilla. and the movie completly blanks out Camilla till the end. where we are getting a "tacky" alegory of "heaven" where Diane joins Camilla in afterlife...

i know i am streching! but the hit theory is so unstable i dont buy it anymore, and look for more stable interpretation.

look at the scene with Joe at the diner (the only piece of reality we got) every clues are only assumptions, not evidences. everything is said and shown in a manner doubt is always possible purposely.

more questions:
-how Diane got her gun? the movie doesnt say. the story doesnt emphasis on this.

-how Diane, little innocent girl from Deep River, new in town, finds a hitman, and makes a safe deal with him without being manipulated? come on any crook who is bad enough to kill people for money would abuses this poor helpless girl, steal her money and never meets her again. to kill a movie "star" is probably not that easy, especially from an individual without a massive organisation.

-why the blue key is carefuly sitting on the coffee table? she never stares at the key longfuly, pondering about her decision... the key stays there like a trophee.
i mean Diane was in love of Camilla, and even if Camilla rejected her, it must hurt to kill her, the key is the symbol of her decision to kill her! i can imagine Diane in fury (remorse or just feedback of Camilla never coming back again) throwing the key all over the place, not keeping it under her eyes!

-why dealing a hit, at daytime, in a public place, right next to where she leaves, alone, with so much money in her purse? this is not very clever from the "hitman", nor from Diane...
Jan 2, 2003 12:40 PM
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[QUOTE]-how Diane, little innocent girl from Deep River, new in town, finds a hitman, and makes a safe deal with him without being manipulated? come on any crook who is bad enough to kill people for money would abuses this poor helpless girl, steal her money and never meets her again. to kill a movie "star" is probably not that easy, especially from an individual without a massive organisation.[/QUOTE]


We are led to believe that Diane's innocence has been lost quite some time since her move from Deep River to Hollywood.
It has been speculated to quite a large degree on this forum that Diane has succumbed to a life of prostitution to try and make ends meet after finding out she couldn't cut it in Hollywood. If in indeed she is a prostitute, her pimp would probably have connections to a hitman - just like in her dream, where Joe is asking the pimp and the hooker if they've seen a new girl on the streets.
This is very much in line with the message David Lynch appears to be conveying about Hollywood in Mulholland Drive. There are countless young innocent girls who go to Hollywood with big dreams of being a star, but instead wind up as prostitutes and/or drug addicts.
Jan 2, 2003 1:01 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
We are led to believe that Diane's innocence has been lost quite some time since her move from Deep River to Hollywood.
It has been speculated to quite a large degree on this forum that Diane has succumbed to a life of prostitution to try and make ends meet after finding out she couldn't cut it in Hollywood. If in indeed she is a prostitute, her pimp would probably have connections to a hitman - just like in her dream, where Joe is asking the pimp and the hooker if they've seen a new girl on the streets.
This is very much in line with the message David Lynch appears to be conveying about Hollywood in Mulholland Drive. There are countless young innocent girls who go to Hollywood with big dreams of being a star, but instead wind up as prostitutes and/or drug addicts.
[/QUOTE]

i am sure it happens...
but that is not what the movie tell us about Diane.
compare the incest/prostituion issue of Laura Palmer with Diane's. Lynch gives proper exposure to those issues in TwinPeaks. here in MD, a 2 minutes talk of Joe with a hooker is not enough to base the whole (real) life of Diane into prostitution.
i mean there are possible clues, and there are obvious developpements.
Jan 2, 2003 1:28 PM
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HarryTuttle,

You asked how an innocent girl like Diane could have had connections with a hitman.... I gave you an answer. Whether we actually know if she's a prostitute is irrelevant - all we need to know is that it is quite possible that she could have had connections to sinister persons such as hitmen.
And if we are to use Diane's waking life as a model, we are not given enough clues about anything other than a tiny handful of actual physical happenings. We are given far more clues in her dream, whether symbolic or not, as to Diane's personal world ... because then we are inside her head.
Then it becomes a question of going back and trying to figure out what's really going on in Diane's life by trying to decipher the symbolism of her dream and piecing it together with the things we are shown to have actually happened.

I am having trouble understanding your reasons for doubting the hit. Could you try and explain it further? Thanks.
Jan 2, 2003 2:14 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by spadger
In the TV Pilot of MD there's a scene after the corpse is discovered where Rita gets the hat box out and offers Betty the money to continue hiding her. Betty refuses Rita's offer and the hat box is put away again. It seems to me this scene was cut from the film late on (post production?), thus explaining the missing hat and movement of the cash.... I think! [/QUOTE]

Well the TV Pilot Screenplay did have that scene. Whether that scene was actually filmed is anyone's guess. The screenplay also had Rita encounter a coyote ...

Certainly, since DL chosed not to use the scene for the movie - we can't really get much from that. It would be interesting to know whether the scene after Club Silencio was in the can or new film done for the movie.

For those of you wondering about the key I mentioned that Diane had I wasn't referring to the Blue triangle key but the apartment key to her Aunt's.

I forgot that there really was no key used to open the apartment door (or so it seems) when the got back from Club Silencio.
Jan 2, 2003 3:04 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
Then it becomes a question of going back and trying to figure out what's really going on in Diane's life by trying to decipher the symbolism of her dream and piecing it together with the things we are shown to have actually happened.[/QUOTE]

dream is not conscious. i dont like to say the subconcious is one's "true" hidden personality... it is wrong, our true personality is our conscious (which can be faked or concealed intentionaly by ourselves, these are social issues). the subconscious which is the only creator of dreams, is pressured by repression, and like a punished brat (social reducation/morality) feels the need to relieve itself by saying big words, acting naughty (all in our subconscious is about sexual issues, like Freud said) and dreams are the place express unspoken desirs/fantasies/wishes, while the conscience is at rest, but still has to cover the "bad" thoughts with symbols to sneak around the morale censorship.

sorry to sound like i am giving a lecture but i would like to clear out a misconception about dreams.
those bad thoughts are only basic relationship schemes (like the Oedipal complexion) but we have been taught that some things cannot be spelled out, even if it is what we feel, thus repression. only society calls them "bad" or "obscene" for etiquette purpose.
to analyze a dream in sexual or scatological terms is not at all gross or pervert, it is like what gynecology is to medecine, technical terms for what afraids us. it is not gross, it is just socialy unacceptable to express it publicaly (or even to yourself).

so back to dreams: what we see in a dream will generaly be untrue: because truth is censored. there is no point for the subconscious to tell facts acceptable in the conscious wake. that is why the dream factory will "change names", scramble the message, cause confusion. then the dream content is far from reality (both real life and subconscious feelings). the bits and pieces from reality are used like a mute mime its message and points at things available in sight. daily reality is the material available to the subconscious to rearrange them in an onirical way so its repression is vented out and goes unoticed liek gibberish.

from this we note some elements are taken directly from recent daily life, or present mind concerns hanging around in the conscience, some is pure invention (the awkward dreamy stuff).
Only the dreamer himself could decypher the message using the universal symbols used by the unconscious. because for an outside observer, the keys are not familiar, the dreamer will make the very same connection that te subconscious made, pikcing in the personal memory (free association).
so to us it is difficult to tell what is Diane's reality, and what is made up, we will use our individual "association-work" to make conections and go on teh wrong track.
but things are obvious in a dream, because symbols are usual and the role of it in the dream comes naturaly with certain "logic".

if we believe Betty is not Diane, Rita is not Camilla, Rita escaped miraculously a terrible accident unharmed, Woody was seduced by Betty's performance, an allknowing cowboy dictates artistic choices, Joe is a lame hitman, the expresso was that bad... then we are deluded by the subconscious tricks.

we need to step back and not buy face value, think twice and wonder why Diane's dream express this, what is the role in the dream.

what appears in the dream is more important than what doesnt, and is assumed by our awaken conscience.
Jan 2, 2003 4:34 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
I am having trouble understanding your reasons for doubting the hit. Could you try and explain it further? Thanks. [/QUOTE]
u only answered one of the 4 questions i asked at the end of my post, that make me doubt the reality of the hit.
from the little we see of Diane and Camilla (what Lynch decides to show us, to convey his message) is not enough to make the hit credible.
the key is obviously put there intentionaly to let the audience believe, but you have to agree none of the evidences needed are shown or induced by Lynch to make Camilla's death credible and certain.
-no corpse (only diane's, who actually dies).
-no murder scene (although we are shown 3 unimportant people killed in the dream.
-no evidences incriminating Diane personaly (notice the lack of scenes concerning Camilla's fate after the deal with Joe, or even after the party).
-no (real) motive (the portray of Diane looks like a girl who have psychological problems, but is not bloodthirsty or murderous.
Jan 2, 2003 4:45 PM
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HarryTuttle,
I agree that one's dreams are not necessarily a precise measure of the truth, but what I was trying to say is that we are not given very much to go off in the reality scenes. We are given a woman's motive for committing a horrible act, but the dream gives us more of an understanding of her thought processes. Even if the truth is buried, we are given a chance to analyze what we see on the surface and try and dig down to uncover it. Two thirds of the movie are devoted to a dream whereas only one third is reality - most of which is told in flashbacks.
So, it's very hard to come up with anything that could be considered an actual occurrence. Some people have even theorized that the whole movie is one big dream. Who are we to say whether or not that's true. We can argue about nitpicky things till we're blue in the face, but trying to 'prove' anything is futile. It is up to us how we choose to solve the things that are puzzling us. All I wanted to know was how you, HarryTuttle have reached the conclusion that the hit was an improbabilty.
Personally, I like to use Diane's dream to try and garner answers to my own questions simply because, from what I know of David Lynch, he places such an importance on dreams. I'm pretty sure we are supposed to go back and try figure things out from the dream. I like to view my own dreams as my subconcious's way of creating imaginary scenarios to try to sort out problems I may be experiencing in my life, and I tend to view Mulholland Drive (and Fight Club) in the same light. But, that's just my opinion after all.
Jan 2, 2003 5:12 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by HarryTuttle
u only answered one of the 4 questions i asked at the end of my post, that make me doubt the reality of the hit.
from the little we see of Diane and Camilla (what Lynch decides to show us, to convey his message) is not enough to make the hit credible.
the key is obviously put there intentionaly to let the audience believe, but you have to agree none of the evidences needed are shown or induced by Lynch to make Camilla's death credible and certain.
-no corpse (only diane's, who actually dies).
-no murder scene (although we are shown 3 unimportant people killed in the dream.
-no evidences incriminating Diane personaly (notice the lack of scenes concerning Camilla's fate after the deal with Joe, or even after the party).
-no (real) motive (the portray of Diane looks like a girl who have psychological problems, but is not bloodthirsty or murderous.
[/QUOTE]

The reason I didn't answer the other questions is because I can't figure out what you are trying to say in them. The grammar and wording are somewhat awkward, and I need some time to rework the sentence structure so I might understand your points better.
Why do we have to see a corpse to have proof that a murder has been commited? Especially when we are told that the next time we see that blue key, it will signify that a hit has been carried out.
Can you explain what you mean when you say 'the little we see of Diane and Camilla is not enough to make the hit credible'?
If observing Diane order the hit isn't incriminating evidence, then what is?
Many crimes of passion are commited by people who are not ordinarily 'Hannibal Lecterish'. Jealousy and obsession can lead the meekest of people to murder the object of their desires. I think we are shown that Diane has a very real motive for wanting Camilla dead. Are you familiar with the phrase, 'If I can't have you, nobody else can either?'
Jan 2, 2003 5:42 PM
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Okay, Harry.
I reviewed those questions again, and I will attempt to answer.


1. You ask how Diane could have got a gun. How does anybody in the U.S. get a gun? Apparently, considering the amount of controversy that the NRA stirs up, it's not such a difficult task to acquire a firearms license. I believe that there is quite a number of U.S. citizens who keep firearms as a self-defense measure, in case of a home invasion, etc. I don't see any issue with Diane keeping a gun in her nightstand.

2. You ask why Diane is not looking ruefully at the key on the coffee table... It was my understanding that she was. She seemed very troubled by its presence.

3. You ask why Diane would want to order the hit in such a public place. It shows us just what a fantasy world Diane is living in... that she cannot comprehend the seriousness of the actions she is about to carry out. Even when the hitman warns her not to brandish the photo, she fails to recognize the gravity of the situation. She is so consumed by her obsession and jealousy that she is living inside her own head - or inside a movie of her own making, in which she is the director and the star.
It's only later when she receives the key and experiences her cathartic dream that she is awakened to the cold blue light of day.
Jan 2, 2003 6:01 PM
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"Even when the hitman warns her not to brandish the photo, she fails to recognize the gravity of the situation."


Yes, you're right but it is generally assumed that Joe will kill Camilla himself. But what about if Joe orders someone else to do the hit? In that case, I can understand that he accepts to meet Diane publicly in a Winkie's. Moreover, he warns Diane that she could not retract herself after she gives him the money, as if he could not stop Camilla's execution, once he has contacted a hitman to do the job.

I think there may be a connection (at least in Diane's mind) with Ed's black book carried by Joe and full of phone numbers which may explain the history of the world: it could be the phone numbers of hitmen and of course they rewrite the history of the world with their murders.
Jan 2, 2003 6:32 PM
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
Personally, I like to use Diane's dream to try and garner answers to my own questions simply because, from what I know of David Lynch, he places such an importance on dreams. I'm pretty sure we are supposed to go back and try figure things out from the dream.[/QUOTE]

and my point is Lynch use to picture dreams in a much different way. if Diane is as troubled as Laura Palmer (because of sexual abuse and all), or like in Blue Velvet (not to go as far as Eraserhead) dreams are real torture that show how the mind of the dreamer is offended and helpless!
all we see in MD is very much un-dreamlike (most of the time) and reflects the usual dream of a sane person... relationship issues, frustrations, envy, angst, undirect desir (just a wish not a task she promised herself to achieve) to take out someone.

[QUOTE]Why do we have to see a corpse to have proof that a murder has been commited? Especially when we are told that the next time we see that blue key, it will signify that a hit has been carried out.
If observing Diane order the hit isn't incriminating evidence, then what is?
[/QUOTE]
that is the problem! the deal between Diane and Joe is assumed (like the engagement of Adam and Camilla) but not worded properly. it adds mystery, but it is deluding... the situation tells that this is a hit business, but not confirmed by facts or words.

whatch the scene pretending that Diane orders Joe to kidnap Camilla (instead of killing her, like in Fargo) and you'll see that no word or evidence will contradict this arbitrary theory in the entire lengh of the movie.

the key is there, it comes from Joe most certainly and relates to the deal they passed earlier at winkie's, and directly concerns Camilla.
but to say it is about Camilla's death is pure assumption, although it is the most probable case presented by the movie.

my opinion is that if Diane was a "murderer" and not a helpless girl with suicidal tendencies, Lynch would have made a very different movie, including terrifying nighmares instead of candy colored dreams, and put emphasis on Diane's evolution from simple jealousy to madness (which we dont even see in the reality part: she appears blues, no more)
Jan 2, 2003 7:02 PM
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thanks for taking the time to decypher my weak english
i didnt men to command you to answer the questions, just that part of my doubts were contained in them.
i dont have evidences that the hit didnt take place, but i have enough contradictory proofs that Camilla's death is far fetched considering the main content of the movie.

[QUOTE]Originally posted by woodlouse
Okay, Harry.
I reviewed those questions again, and I will attempt to answer.


1. You ask how Diane could have got a gun. How does anybody in the U.S. get a gun? Apparently, considering the amount of controversy that the NRA stirs up, it's not such a difficult task to acquire a firearms license. I believe that there is quite a number of U.S. citizens who keep firearms as a self-defense measure, in case of a home invasion, etc. I don't see any issue with Diane keeping a gun in her nightstand.
[/QUOTE]

granted. must be a more comon thing in USA. but i meant, the gun pops out for convenience at the last minute, without warning that the threat was familiar and that Diane had this handy way to kill herself, in order to build up the compassion and anxiety in the audience. to film a closed drawer in which we know there is a gun is generating more anxiety than a blue key.
i am not dicussing Lynch's artistic choice, but considering the meaning of the clues he choose to focus on and those he never developed.

[QUOTE]2. You ask why Diane is not looking ruefully at the key on the coffee table... It was my understanding that she was. She seemed very troubled by its presence.[/QUOTE]

does she stare at the blue key ont he table during the last scene? i thought her look was lost in the blur, beyond the table...

[QUOTE]3. You ask why Diane would want to order the hit in such a public place. It shows us just what a fantasy world Diane is living in... that she cannot comprehend the seriousness of the actions she is about to carry out. Even when the hitman warns her not to brandish the photo, she fails to recognize the gravity of the situation. She is so consumed by her obsession and jealousy that she is living inside her own head - or inside a movie of her own making, in which she is the director and the star.[/QUOTE]

We know Diane lives in fantasy, that's why she made herself believe she could get rid of Camilla with a magic blue box (symbol of superior "Deus-Ex-Machina" forces) and she may have wish and dream to kill Camilla through Rita.
But i think the winkies is something more personal to Diane, not concerning Camilla (unless the bum is Camilla...).

-i think that Dan & Herb, the stroke,
-the mysterious business with Joe, the blue key, the laughter at her question about what it opens,
-the waitress she borrowed her dream name,
-the "monster behind the WALL", this "God-Awful Feeling",
-the way she drags Camilla there to sort things out,
-the way she parallely drags Camilla to her own dead body at Sierra Bonita.
have all something to do with her inner conflicts, possibly her love for Camilla, and her suicidal tendencies.

THIS is a substential message from her subconscious, but the clues are too numerous and contradictory to give a definite answer to Diane's real concerns. however i can tell somehow that the real issues are beyond jealousy, carreer deception, crime of passion, and remorse for the hit. at least that is not what the content of the movie propose for Diane, even if the appearances are misleading (but so is the club Silencio)!
Jan 2, 2003 7:31 PM
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Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 843
[QUOTE]Originally posted by gandalf36
I think there may be a connection (at least in Diane's mind) with Ed's black book carried by Joe and full of phone numbers which may explain the history of the world: it could be the phone numbers of hitmen and of course they rewrite the history of the world with their murders. [/QUOTE]

my take on this sub story is that Ed stands for Adam in Diane dreams, the disgraceful puppet she can kill in vengeance (a secret desir, not a task). Ed-Adam owns the "history of the world in phone numbers" that control the who's who in his films, and laughs stupidly like at the party, exactly when Diane WISH to kill him (and everyone who stares at her in the room) for the humiliation she finds herself in.

but it is not very obvious, so i wont support it too much. just a thought.
Jan 2, 2003 7:40 PM
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