"The magician at Club Silencio"

Original Poster
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 892
I wrote this in response to blu's post, I am truly amazed by how much Lynch can put in a part of a scene that lasts just a minute or two. There is no significance to the font LOL, its just that im tired of r/t losing long posts so i wrote it in word.

This is my analysis of the magician scene in silencio. I need to give some background information because knowing the basic theme behind MD, which i believe to be sexual abuse and Dianes ability to escape from the memory of it, is essential to understand the meaning of the magicians words and actions.

MD is about Diane, who was sexually abused as a child by her grandmothers male companion. Her grandmother was aware of the abuse but remained silent as did Diane. Like many abused children, Diane had a place in her mind that she escaped to as ?Betty? while the abuse was taking place. This jitterbug place had loud fast music and lots of body motions, and included her grandmother and companion as loving caregivers. Elements that would mask and counteract the horror that was really happening to her. When Diane was grown she also used this escape when she had sex with men. She had to tune herself out, and escape as betty to her special place because it reminded her of the abuse she suffered. This is exactly what is happening in the opening scene in MD known as the jitterbug scene. Diane slowly comes back to reality as she makes her way to her bed and falls asleep.

The name of the club ?Silencio? refers to the silence of Dianes grandmother regarding the abuse. The magician represents the abuser and the blue haired lady Dianes grandmother. The magician says in various languages that there is no band, there is no orchestra, it is all an illusion. This is him telling, and Diane realizing that the jitterbug contest isnt real, it is just an escape. Once the magician establishes this, with the grandmother watching in silence, he says ?listen? and raises his arms causing thunder claps (similar to the raised arms and thunderclaps that drove Diane to suicide). If you listen closely, you will hear feminine gasps, the sound of sex and a male grunting. If u watch, at the same time you will see terror in Betty/Dianes face, her body shaking, but not in a normal trembling fashion, but kind of an up and down movement. The magicians face shakes along with her, and the sights and sounds end with a thrust from the magician and the grunting male sound. The magician gets a devilish evil look on his face, as the blue haired lady still looks on in silence, and he then disappears.

Jul 21, 2004 9:32 AM
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I cant believe noone has responded to this post. It is very good. Reading it makes me realize that this abuse thing is true. Why else would it be called Silencio? why is that woman staring? The evilish grin is a good point too. Her shaking and everything is very confusing, as I said earlier i did hear noises that i didnt notice before. The movie fits with me when you look at things from this perspective.
Jul 21, 2004 1:41 PM
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Impressive analysis. :fresh:

[QUOTE]When Diane was grown she also used this escape when she had sex with men. She had to tune herself out, and escape as betty to her special place because it reminded her of the abuse she suffered. This is exactly what is happening in the opening scene in MD known as the jitterbug scene. Diane slowly comes back to reality as she makes her way to her bed and falls asleep.[/QUOTE]
Are you implying that Diane had sex just before she went to sleep? Or what else was it that iniciated this particular attempt of escapism?

One thing more that puzzles me. I feel uncomfotable with the idea that it's Diane's abuser telling her "all is an illusion". Wouldn't he be the last person who wants to burst the bubble and risk to be jailed for his deads? Well, real life logic might not apply here. :rolleyes:
Jul 21, 2004 5:01 PM
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Excellent analysis, Richdub. This does explain the shaking, "Silencio" itself, and now the sounds accompanying the thunder and lightning become clearer each time I listen.
This is the third of three LOADED references to Diane's sexual abuse so I fully accept that that's her backstory.

I do however still think that "there is no band" / explaining illusion -- even the deep emotion of "Llorando" not being all that it seemed -- is what her inner Rita needed to have Betty realize -- and that illusion message may not be related at all to the rest of your theory. I don't think it's inconsistent with both Betty and Diane saying they'd won a jitterbug contest to believe that it actually happened. Even if it remains troubling to me that her J-bug partner is NOWHERE to be seen; and also that the contest relates to the place she escaped from. It was her ticket out. So ... somebody convince me.

But the grandparents ... I could almost agree if I didn't already think the theory of them representing her failed expectations was so overpowering.
What does support you is this: "Thanks, Irene, it was sure nice to have YOU to talk to." She also doesn't address the (unnamed) man; he talks to her.

I do wonder why they flank her in the beginning montage as she smiles, then she's alone, then there's another view that fades in with them moving in and JOINING her on each side, or just over each shoulder?

Anyway, good work.
Jul 21, 2004 6:13 PM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
67DanoExcellent analysis, Richdub. This does explain the shaking, "Silencio" itself, and now the sounds accompanying the thunder and lightning become clearer each time I listen.
Gandalf suggested on another thread (I think attributing the idea to Rochas) that the shaking is actually electrocution. Although I don't buy the idea that the entire Club Silencio scene is about that, I tend to agree that that is the likeliest explanation for the shaking, as it occurs immediately after the thunder and lightning. And, while it's true that there is an up and down movement, it is too rapid and too much concentrated in the upper part of the body for explicit sexual associations.
Jul 21, 2004 6:19 PM
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Thanks richdubbya, your post helped me decoding most of the silencio scene. But i tend to disagree with you on the "jitterbug contest escape theory", the jitterbug could be an escape place but i don't think it occurs when diane have sex with men. i think diane is a strict lesbian, cause if you don't like men why sleep with them? also i don't believe that her mental state allows her to enter in a sexual relation in the opening scene, rather i think that she went into her "escape place" because she received the blue key. The escape place could have been created when she was sexually abused, but later was used for every diturbing situation she faced in her life.
Jul 22, 2004 12:32 AM
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blu
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 343
Thanks for kicking off Rich. :up:
Good post.

Maybe the third paragraph could make up (part?) of your spot on the website?

Thorni think diane is a strict lesbian, cause if you don't like men why sleep with them?
$$$

or

She is being forced to; psychologically or physically.
Jul 22, 2004 1:15 AM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
bluThanks for kicking off Rich. :up:
Good post.

Maybe the third paragraph could make up (part?) of your spot on the website?

$$$

or

She is being forced to; psychologically or physically.

What is the evidence that Diane is being forced to sleep with anyone?
Jul 22, 2004 8:04 AM
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blu
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 343
jroWhat is the evidence that Diane is being forced to sleep with anyone?
There is none.

I was answering the question as to why a strict lesbian would possibly sleep with a man if they are not that way inclined. My answer was not exclusively MD related.

Just a suggestion anyway.

Another thought; Diane may be struggling to sleep her way to the top. All Camilla does is bang a couple of directors and she's a star (allegedly ;)). Perhaps Diane has been screwing (male and female) casting directors, producers, greasy Italian-Americans, directors, tea-boys, receptionists etc. for ages and is getting nothing for it.

Possibly keeping Daddy/Uncle/Grandad/Dad's friend happy with sexual favours brought her gifts and treats back in Deep River. Where does it get her in Hollywood?

Not as far as she expected, clearly.
Jul 22, 2004 8:18 AM
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richdubbyaI wrote this in response to blu's post, I am truly amazed by how much Lynch can put in a part of a scene that lasts just a minute or two. There is no significance to the font LOL, its just that im tired of r/t losing long posts so i wrote it in word.

This is my analysis of the magician scene in silencio. I need to give some background information because knowing the basic theme behind MD, which i believe to be sexual abuse and Dianes ability to escape from the memory of it, is essential to understand the meaning of the magicians words and actions.

MD is about Diane, who was sexually abused as a child by her grandmothers male companion. Her grandmother was aware of the abuse but remained silent as did Diane. Like many abused children, Diane had a place in her mind that she escaped to as ?Betty? while the abuse was taking place. This jitterbug place had loud fast music and lots of body motions, and included her grandmother and companion as loving caregivers. Elements that would mask and counteract the horror that was really happening to her. When Diane was grown she also used this escape when she had sex with men. She had to tune herself out, and escape as betty to her special place because it reminded her of the abuse she suffered. This is exactly what is happening in the opening scene in MD known as the jitterbug scene. Diane slowly comes back to reality as she makes her way to her bed and falls asleep.

The name of the club ?Silencio? refers to the silence of Dianes grandmother regarding the abuse. The magician represents the abuser and the blue haired lady Dianes grandmother. The magician says in various languages that there is no band, there is no orchestra, it is all an illusion. This is him telling, and Diane realizing that the jitterbug contest isnt real, it is just an escape. Once the magician establishes this, with the grandmother watching in silence, he says ?listen? and raises his arms causing thunder claps (similar to the raised arms and thunderclaps that drove Diane to suicide). If you listen closely, you will hear feminine gasps, the sound of sex and a male grunting. If u watch, at the same time you will see terror in Betty/Dianes face, her body shaking, but not in a normal trembling fashion, but kind of an up and down movement. The magicians face shakes along with her, and the sights and sounds end with a thrust from the magician and the grunting male sound. The magician gets a devilish evil look on his face, as the blue haired lady still looks on in silence, and he then disappears.


Greetings Richdub & Al,

Interesting points there.

I would like to point out that the "Silencio" reference has or might have multiple meaning.

Remember Hamlet's last words: "The rest is silence". This literary allusion goes very well with Diane's situation. (if you want I can expand on this, for now let's just mention that both Hamlet and Diane can be considered as tragic heros, i.e. decent people with a fatal flaw whose flaw caused their downfall. They both have innocent people killed, and the ending is open in both for Shakespeare and for Lynch).

"Silencio!" is also the last word in the Godard movie, "Contempt". Check out the Lost on MD site on that.

My two cents only,
Jul 22, 2004 8:51 AM
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Thanks deepmovie, bob, dan and blu

Bob, yes i do believe Diane is having sex and is in an escape mechanism (the jitterbug contest) at the start of the film.

on the abuser telling Diane "its an illusion" This is Diane dreaming this, im sure the real abuser didnt even know about the escape. Diane was brought to silencio in the dream by camilla "take me somewhere". IMO the first time diane experiences sex as herself and not using an escape is with camilla "i want to with you". This in real life starts the crumbling of the escape. I think Diane lost the ability to tune out and escape. This is the meaning of the masturbation scene, she is trying to escape and cant. My opinion is that the blue key and the money have to do with sexual favors. Watch the film and see what happens 2 seconds after the money and key are found. The blue key is left "where I told you" and is what the cowboy used to enter Dianes apt. Lynch borrowed an idea from a clockwork orange for the key. Dianes bedroom door was open, yet we hear a heavy (front door) open before the cowboy says "pretty girl". Diane was unable to reach her escape place so she was devastated (the corpse). The cowboy left the key on the table. Diane was so devastated she could not answer the phone or make arangements to place the key again for 3 weeks. Diane was left without her love (camilla), without the bit parts that camilla got for her, unable to do sexual favors for money or parts. Finally the memory of the abuse starts to come back with the arrival of the old couple. With no escape Diane realizes she will have to experience the abuse and it is too much for her.
Jul 22, 2004 1:08 PM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
ThornThanks richdubbya, your post helped me decoding most of the silencio scene. But i tend to disagree with you on the "jitterbug contest escape theory", the jitterbug could be an escape place but i don't think it occurs when diane have sex with men. i think diane is a strict lesbian, cause if you don't like men why sleep with them? also i don't believe that her mental state allows her to enter in a sexual relation in the opening scene, rather i think that she went into her "escape place" because she received the blue key. The escape place could have been created when she was sexually abused, but later was used for every diturbing situation she faced in her life.

You have to bear in mind that Diane has no partner in the jitterbug contest. She's only associated with the two oldsters. That sharply limits how far you can stretch the sexual associations of the jitterbugging.
Jul 22, 2004 1:20 PM
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bluThere is none.

I was answering the question as to why a strict lesbian would possibly sleep with a man if they are not that way inclined. My answer was not exclusively MD related.

Just a suggestion anyway.

Another thought; Diane may be struggling to sleep her way to the top. All Camilla does is bang a couple of directors and she's a star (allegedly ;)). Perhaps Diane has been screwing (male and female) casting directors, producers, greasy Italian-Americans, directors, tea-boys, receptionists etc. for ages and is getting nothing for it.

Possibly keeping Daddy/Uncle/Grandad/Dad's friend happy with sexual favours brought her gifts and treats back in Deep River. Where does it get her in Hollywood?

Not as far as she expected, clearly.

Greetings, Blu,

I would be extremely careful to declare Diane a lesbian.

Chances are good that she might be bi-sexual (see Blue-riven's thread on Betty / Adam love interest) in her dream sequence as well as in her real life. Just like Camilla Rhodes...

My two cents only,
Jul 22, 2004 1:50 PM
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richdubbyaThanks deepmovie, bob, dan and blu

Bob, yes i do believe Diane is having sex and is in an escape mechanism (the jitterbug contest) at the start of the film.

on the abuser telling Diane "its an illusion" This is Diane dreaming this, im sure the real abuser didnt even know about the escape. Diane was brought to silencio in the dream by camilla "take me somewhere". IMO the first time diane experiences sex as herself and not using an escape is with camilla "i want to with you". This in real life starts the crumbling of the escape. I think Diane lost the ability to tune out and escape. This is the meaning of the masturbation scene, she is trying to escape and cant. My opinion is that the blue key and the money have to do with sexual favors. Watch the film and see what happens 2 seconds after the money and key are found. The blue key is left "where I told you" and is what the cowboy used to enter Dianes apt. Lynch borrowed an idea from a clockwork orange for the key. Dianes bedroom door was open, yet we hear a heavy (front door) open before the cowboy says "pretty girl". Diane was unable to reach her escape place so she was devastated (the corpse). The cowboy left the key on the table. Diane was so devastated she could not answer the phone or make arangements to place the key again for 3 weeks. Diane was left without her love (camilla), without the bit parts that camilla got for her, unable to do sexual favors for money or parts. Finally the memory of the abuse starts to come back with the arrival of the old couple. With no escape Diane realizes she will have to experience the abuse and it is too much for her.

I heard the front door sound too and I wondered what it meant. It didnt sound like a door closing, but opening. You are right. This is a pretty good theory you have, it answers a lot of questions. I think its obvious that the old people were definetely involved in her abuse because of the way they grin like they are evil and the way they act towards her chasing her down and it looks as if its the ultimate reason for her killing herself. This theory does make sense to me. I cant dispute it at all. Maybe a few things, like why the cowboy talks to Adam and things like that, but there is a lot of focus on sexual things in this movie going from the audition to the hooker on the street, to the sounds in Silencio, to her masturbating, and like you said, she did look as if she was trying to reach something but couldnt. Such food for thought. Nothing else explains the jitterbugging scene to me other than what you said either, ive never been able to come up with a valid explanation for what the dancing scene means and as I said before thigns are making sense to me now. Thanks for posting this!
Jul 24, 2004 11:07 AM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
Rochas ReduxAs I think I've written before, since we're in California here, anybody getting the death sentance (either as an unlucky accessory or after being framed by the hitman) for icing Camilla would probably get gas (highly unlikely) or lethal injection. (In Canada it's jailtime with 24/7 Celine Dion's Best Of, I think.).
It's all in Diane's head. She overdramatizes everything.
Jul 24, 2004 12:00 PM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
But anyway...

The electrocution scene is in there mainly because David Lynch likes to tie as many things together as he can. A guy after my own heart. The main reason for the thunder and lightning is its association with the 16th Tarot card: the Tower. The thunder and lightning scene at the Club Silencio is related to the thunder and lightning just before she kills herself, so it's natural to imply a fatal effect. It is also connected to Fred Madison's obsession with his impending electrocution in Lost Highway: there's a lot of electrocution-related imagery in that movie. A more obscure connection is with the electrocution of the trespassing replicant in Blade Runner, a movie that also uses the Tower card symbolism and that also associates the electrocution with a lightning strike. (Blade Runner was directed by Ridley Scott, who preceded Lynch as the director of Dune, and has a number of Mulholland Drive elements.) I also seem to remember, though I'll have to check to make sure, that Mary had a brief seizure in Eraserhead that was similar to Betty's at the Club Silencio.
Jul 24, 2004 4:50 PM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
Rochas ReduxWell, jro, I don't know much about the Tarot, so the idea of using it as a template for interpretation is outside my purview..
The 16th Tarot card, the Tower, is all about sudden events that shake the foundation of your life. It shows a tower being struck by lightning and two people falling from it in flames. I don't think there is any question that it is important in Mulholland Drive. Maybe BriteLite will get going on that...

Rochas Redux
Regarding 'Blade Runner' there was apparently another actress cast as a fifth replicant, and scenes of her gradually dying were seemingly cut, and this has led to a whole nest of problems for fans of the film re whether Harrison Ford's character is a swiftly-reprogrammed comrade of the renegade four remaining (did Zhora recognise him, and just how did Batty know his name was 'Deckard'?), or whether one really did get fried going through that electric field.
Well, according to what was said in the movie, a replicant got fried running through an electrical field. Whatever the intentions regarding the other replicant, and they seem to have changed as the movie progressed, that's the way the final version had it. And, as the opening scene shows a lightning strike that seems to have hit the Tyrell building, there is an association there with the replicant getting fried. (Note, too, that the opening scene of Blade Runner and the Club Silencio scene both include Devil figures: in the case of Blade Runner, it is Roy Batty, in whose eye you see the reflection of an explosion.) Blade Runner is very similar thematically to Mulholland Drive: at the very end, Deckard realizes that he is a replicant and therefore has only a short time to live. And of course Tyrell is portrayed as an abusive parent in his interactions with Roy Batty.

Oh, BTW, that was one of the great smoking scenes of all time. One of my favorite Blade Runner scenes.
Jul 25, 2004 5:21 AM
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jroThe 16th Tarot card, the Tower, is all about sudden events that shake the foundation of your life. It shows a tower being struck by lightning and two people falling from it in flames. I don't think there is any question that it is important in Mulholland Drive. Maybe BriteLite will get going on that...

Well, according to what was said in the movie, a replicant got fried running through an electrical field. Whatever the intentions regarding the other replicant, and they seem to have changed as the movie progressed, that's the way the final version had it. And, as the opening scene shows a lightning strike that seems to have hit the Tyrell building, there is an association there with the replicant getting fried. Blade Runner is very similar thematically to Mulholland Drive: at the very end, Deckard realizes that he is a replicant and therefore has only a short time to live. And of course Tyrell is portrayed as an abusive parent in his interactions with Roy Batty.

Greetings Jro & All,

Thanks for quoting me on the thread.

Jro, you remember well, it was a time when I associated the XVIth card with many things in MD. (I can repost here my previous post for reference.)

Given the fact that Lynch might know absolutely nothing about Tarot spread, however, made me realize that this idea was a mere projection of my own mind...

Right now I lean toward:

(1) conveying Diane's inner drama (inner tempest)
(2) fear of death punishment (electrocution)

(Rochas is right, there is no capital punishment in Canada in any of the provinces. I do not know about Celine Dion, yet it is a good guess to perform a soft form of euthanasia...)

=====================================================
Here is the repost of my previous thoughts on Tower/MD:

The number 16 is comes up repeatedly in Mulholland Drive. (16 is Adam?s hotel room, 16 Reasons? is the audition song, Aunt Ruth lives at 1612 Havenhurst, Diane Selwyn lives at 2590 Sierra Bonita, when Rita and Betty play detectives at Sierra Bonita, they pass by appt. 16 to discover Diane?s body. The number 16 is displayed with a different colour.)



That reminded me of the traditional Tarot deck. The deck has 78 cards which are divided into two main sections: a major arcana and a minor arcana. The major arcana is a set of 22 picture cards which are also called the greater arcana, trumps, atouts (from the Egyptian atennu (Wallis Budge, 1920) meaning a book or part of a book), or triumphs. These cards are pictorial representations of various cosmic forces such as Death, Justice, Strength, and so on, and contain archetypal symbolism.



Although several colorful theories exist today, the true history of the Tarot is largely unknown. Gypsies brought it to Europe and popularized it as a tool of fortune telling.



Karl Jung used frequently the traditional Tarot deck, especially the Major Arcana in therapy. The Major Arcana tells the story of a man's life as he progresses through life. For those who are interested to learn about the meaning of all Major Arcana cards, here is an interesting link: [font=Times New Roman]http://grandpasgeneral.com/ltarot13.html#Major[/font]



To those who know the deck, number XVI card, the Tower is perhaps the most dreaded card, far more than Death or The Devil. It is also a very difficult card to read and handle. Here are some possible interpretation of the Tower card.



[list]"A Whack on the Side of the Head" (the title of a book about insights) "Pride goeth before a fall." (from the Book of Proverbs). Amnesia, total destruction of the mindBeing Disillusioned (i.e. being Enlightened, losing Illusions) Breaking Out of Self-created Prisons (made from mistaken beliefs) Crisis Coming to a Head (the situation must now be faced) Getting Kicked Out of Your "Ivory Tower" Into the "Real World" Giving Up Your Illusions (or being forced to) Inner World Turns Upside-Down (a sudden shift in your reality) Painting Yourself Into a Corner (then having to wreck your work to escape) Reality Check (false assumptions revealed as unworkable) Revelation (sudden, sometimes shocking, revealing of real Truth) Self-Delusions Suddenly Disappearing (when the Truth is seen) [*]Suicide Mission[/list]

Aren?t those traditional Tarot interpretations hauntingly coincide with Mulholland Drive?s main themes? I wonder if Lynch knows something about the Tarot deck, but it seems to be too much of a coincidence.

Jul 25, 2004 5:45 AM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
BriteLiteGreetings Jro & All,

Thanks for quoting me on the thread.

Jro, you remember well, it was a time when I associated the XVIth card with many things in MD. (I can repost here my previous post for reference.)

Given the fact that Lynch might know absolutely nothing about Tarot spread, however, made me realize that this idea was a mere projection of my own mind...

Right now I lean toward:

(1) conveying Diane's inner drama (inner tempest)
(2) fear of death punishment (electrocution)

(Rochas is right, there is no capital punishment in Canada in any of the provinces. I do not know about Celine Dion, yet it is a good guess to perform a soft form of euthanasia...)

=====================================================
Here is the repost of my previous thoughts on Tower/MD:

The number 16 is comes up repeatedly in Mulholland Drive. (16 is Adam?s hotel room, 16 Reasons? is the audition song, Aunt Ruth lives at 1612 Havenhurst, Diane Selwyn lives at 2590 Sierra Bonita, when Rita and Betty play detectives at Sierra Bonita, they pass by appt. 16 to discover Diane?s body. The number 16 is displayed with a different colour.)



That reminded me of the traditional Tarot deck. The deck has 78 cards which are divided into two main sections: a major arcana and a minor arcana. The major arcana is a set of 22 picture cards which are also called the greater arcana, trumps, atouts (from the Egyptian atennu (Wallis Budge, 1920) meaning a book or part of a book), or triumphs. These cards are pictorial representations of various cosmic forces such as Death, Justice, Strength, and so on, and contain archetypal symbolism.



Although several colorful theories exist today, the true history of the Tarot is largely unknown. Gypsies brought it to Europe and popularized it as a tool of fortune telling.



Karl Jung used frequently the traditional Tarot deck, especially the Major Arcana in therapy. The Major Arcana tells the story of a man's life as he progresses through life. For those who are interested to learn about the meaning of all Major Arcana cards, here is an interesting link: [font=Times New Roman]http://grandpasgeneral.com/ltarot13.html#Major[/font]



To those who know the deck, number XVI card, the Tower is perhaps the most dreaded card, far more than Death or The Devil. It is also a very difficult card to read and handle. Here are some possible interpretation of the Tower card.

[list]"A Whack on the Side of the Head" (the title of a book about insights) "Pride goeth before a fall." (from the Book of Proverbs). Amnesia, total destruction of the mindBeing Disillusioned (i.e. being Enlightened, losing Illusions) Breaking Out of Self-created Prisons (made from mistaken beliefs) Crisis Coming to a Head (the situation must now be faced) Getting Kicked Out of Your "Ivory Tower" Into the "Real World" Giving Up Your Illusions (or being forced to) Inner World Turns Upside-Down (a sudden shift in your reality) Painting Yourself Into a Corner (then having to wreck your work to escape) Reality Check (false assumptions revealed as unworkable) Revelation (sudden, sometimes shocking, revealing of real Truth) Self-Delusions Suddenly Disappearing (when the Truth is seen) [*]Suicide Mission[/list]Aren?t those traditional Tarot interpretations hauntingly coincide with Mulholland Drive?s main themes? I wonder if Lynch knows something about the Tarot deck, but it seems to be too much of a coincidence.
Well, I still lean toward the Tower card, as it fits the theme and the importance of the number 16 in the movie. There is no reason IMO to say "Oh it can't be the tower card because David Lynch may not know anything about the Tarot." I imagine that he does. After all, everyone has at least heard of the Tarot, and it would be consistent with David Lynch's interest in things like numerology.

The Tower connection also goes well with the appearance of towers in at least two of the paintings and the association with Vertigo, not to mention the association of thunder with knocking on a door.
Jul 25, 2004 5:47 AM
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jroWell, I still lean toward the Tower card, as it fits the theme and the importance of the number 16 in the movie. There is no reason IMO to say "Oh it can't be the tower card because David Lynch may not know anything about the Tarot." I imagine that he does. After all, everyone has at least heard of the Tarot, and it would be consistent with David Lynch's interest in things like numerology.

The Tower connection also goes well with the appearance of towers in at least two of the paintings and the association with Vertigo, not to mention the association of thunder with knocking on a door.

Yep! Too many thematic similarities for "just a coincedence" for number 16.

Yet nowadays I like better the 1 + 6 = 7 explanation for this number. Many cultures have this seven-fold system.
Jul 25, 2004 9:06 AM
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