Probably nothing new here, but I need resolution

Original Poster
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 369
?We can pretend to be somebody else? Betty Elms

Diane personified.

Brokenhearted potential ?great actress? in a performance fit for a queen. Well? maybe a blue-haired lady in the balcony at Club Silencio.

Diane is beyond bitter resentment as she spirals out of control. Tormented with guilt and heartbreak for arranging the murder of her ex-lover, Diane tries to tidy everything up with a movie of her own. Where there is no band and all is an illusion.

Clue #1 - (Two clues prior to the credits)

#1 Jitterbugging is something you do with a partner - Diane is shown bathed in the spotlight as the scene fades into her bedroom. Aside from the two old people, she is alone, without partner.

#2 Diane falls into a pillow - suggesting that what follows is a dream.


Clue #2 - (Notice appearance of the red lampshade)

The red lampshade is shown along side a phone and ashtray early in the film. It rings as the final in a series initiated by Mr. Roque. ?The girl is still missing?. Diane is being called to the stage. Since the Hollywood underworld controls the movie business, Diane would idealize acceptance in this world. The lampshade helps us determine that it was Diane?s house as we see it again when Camilla calls Diane at home to come to the party.


Clue #3 - (Title of the film Adam is directing. Is it mentioned again?)

The Sylvia North Story.

Yes, at the party. Wilkins confirms that Bob Brooker directed it.

Why the change? Adam represents all directors. Diane shows how even Adam is controlled by the Business.

Betty knows Adam?s hands are tied at the audition despite a ?love at first site? gaze. She doesn?t have time to waste her talents there, she has to get back to her performance with Rita. Bob Brooker was present at the audition for Wally and was the only one not moved by Betty?s performance.


Clue #4 - (location of accident)

Secret path leading to Adam?s house on Mulholland Drive. Accident mimics Diane?s real ride up to her humiliation. The party was a breaking point, symbolized by the CRASHING of dishes scene change into Winkie?s. Two crashes at one site.


Clue #5 - (Who gives a key and why?)

Coco gives a key because ?You and you?re aunt probably have an understanding?

Coco is a sympathizer and probably wants rid of Camilla as well. Her safe environment from which to lure Camilla into her blue box would need a key and trusted network of accomplices. (See Clue #10).


Clue #6 - (Notice robe, ashtray and coffee cup)

These are used for time references in the ?real time? scenes.

Ashtray - piano ashtray neighbor takes back - seen again on table during fantasy/memory scene (Diane and Camilla are topless on couch)

Robe - Diane puts on after getting up to answer the door - not worn during masturbation scene.

coffee cup - goes with robe five finger discount at Winkie?s.


Clue #7 - (What is felt, realized and gathered at Club Silencio?)

felt - sadness and heartbreak

realized - That all was an illusion.

gathered - A blue box to capture Camilla - now a wigged Rita - before it all comes to an end.


Clue #8 - (Did talent alone help Camilla?)

No - She was a user. She used the system and the system used her. The Black Widow.


Clue #9 - (Note occurrences of man behind Winkie?s)

The monster is Diane - the real Diane. Not a pretty site, her evil represented by the foul rotting manifestation of how she feels. Kills Dan for knowing too much. Holds the blue box and releases the old people to retrieve Diane. After Diane?s death, the face of the monster is seen along with the curtain from Club Silencio. Now two are in the spotlight - Diane has her idealized partner in her idealized world.


Clue #10 -(Where is Aunt Ruth?)

Dead - She helped Diane with money and an environment to safely operate her plan. Havenhurst is the name after all. This would be something good in Diane?s memory. Probably learned how to pretend to be somebody else with Aunt Ruth. The fact that she is dead helps support her mere existence as proof that we are in an unreal world.





Well there you have it and please??..be gentile. ;)

Mar 15, 2004 8:03 PM
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Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 906
There is so much intentional ambiguity in these clues that I have never known whether to take them seriously or not. It's unusual of Lynch to try to help his viewers "solve" his mysteries. I think they can help with some things though.

Here's my take on some of your thoughts:[QUOTE]Clue #1 - (Two clues prior to the credits)

#1 Jitterbugging is something you do with a partner - Diane is shown bathed in the spotlight as the scene fades into her bedroom. Aside from the two old people, she is alone, without partner.

#2 Diane falls into a pillow - suggesting that what follows is a dream
.[/QUOTE]In order of appearance, the credits list Betty well before Diane. This means that the partner-less jitterbugger we see is Betty. Does this mean that Diane is spinning a yarn when she tells us that she won a jitterbug contest? Or is/was the contest real, but just represented to us differently than how it happened?

Falling into the pillow is one of the most blatantly obvious clues in the film. How I missed it first time around I'll never know. :o

[quote]Clue #2 - (Notice appearance of the red lampshade)

The red lampshade is shown along side a phone and ashtray early in the film. It rings as the final in a series initiated by Mr. Roque. “The girl is still missing”. Diane is being called to the stage. Since the Hollywood underworld controls the movie business, Diane would idealize acceptance in this world. The lampshade helps us determine that it was Diane’s house as we see it again when Camilla calls Diane at home to come to the party
.[/quote]I suppose the actual location of the phone is irrelevant when you look at at like this. The important thing is who is receiving the call, not where they are receiving it. Nice.

[quote]Clue #4 - (location of accident)

Secret path leading to Adam’s house on Mulholland Drive. Accident mimics Diane’s real ride up to her humiliation. The party was a breaking point, symbolized by the CRASHING of dishes scene change into Winkie’s. Two crashes at one site.
[/quote]Lynch says "an accident is a terrible event". Does he mean that an "accident" can be intentional? The dinner party is certainly a terrible event, so do we class it as an "accident"? Also interesting is that the car-crash is not only Diane's method of allowing Camilla to become Rita through the amnesia, but that it also prevents Camilla from reaching her destination (the dinner party?) and allows Diane's guilt to be assuaged as the "hit" fails. Three birds with one stone!

I have wondered why Diane associated the arm-movement of the driver with that of a hitman with a gun. According to the theories of most, the hit was arranged after the dinner party (though admittedly it could have been on her mind at that stage). And why would Diane be anticipating a hit on her? She's really scared when the limo pulls over - is Diane thinking that she is to be shot?

Enough for now...
Mar 19, 2004 5:30 AM
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Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 369
Thanks for the response blu


I agree, the ten clues are not meant to "solve" the film. I've just pondered them so long, I needed a little closure. To my wife's amazement that I am still thinking about this movie 2 yrs later, I sat down and just wrote out what I thought about each clue.

Overall, I'm comfortable with what I think the movie is about. My short digest theory (hopefully soon to grace the forum's website) will include a comment about "Impressionistic Cinema". As in the late 1800s, some art was created so that the viewer couldn't get too close otherwise everything would blend together, thus obscuring the image.

I believe that MD is similar. When we step back from MD, the overall idea and story is better understood (or at least felt). Upon closer inspection, ideas blend together and create doubt about what you think you are seeing.

MD is truly a work of art.
Mar 19, 2004 6:43 AM
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Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 906
[quote=Stooka]Overall, I'm comfortable with what I think the movie is about. My short digest theory (hopefully soon to grace the forum's website) will include a comment about "Impressionistic Cinema". As in the late 1800s, some art was created so that the viewer couldn't get too close otherwise everything would blend together, thus obscuring the image.

I believe that MD is similar. When we step back from MD, the overall idea and story is better understood (or at least felt). Upon closer inspection, ideas blend together and create doubt about what you think you are seeing.[/quote]I agree. But I also believe that there are still diamonds yet to be unearthed in the detail. Even of the unintended, unconcious variety.

Good luck finding "closure". ;)
Mar 19, 2004 11:05 AM
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Joined: Apr 2002
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Closure at least with regards to the ten clues. But never closed entirely.
Anyone who has been here a while knows that closure would end all of the fun.
Mar 19, 2004 5:46 PM
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jro
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 791
Stooka?We can pretend to be somebody else? Betty Elms


Clue #1 - (Two clues prior to the credits)

#1 Jitterbugging is something you do with a partner - Diane is shown bathed in the spotlight as the scene fades into her bedroom. Aside from the two old people, she is alone, without partner.


Clue #10 -(Where is Aunt Ruth?)

Dead - She helped Diane with money and an environment to safely operate The fact that she is dead helps support her mere existence as proof that we are in an unreal world.

Well there you have it and please??..be gentile. ;)

I have a couple of (belated) thoughts on these.

First, not only is Diane shown without a partner in the opening scene, but she also says at the party that she won a jitterbug contest, as though she had done it by herself. So what does all this say about her and what is its bearing on the plot? If she's always alone, doesn't that suggest that she prefers it that way?

Second, I wonder if Aunt Ruth's whereabouts isn't in Diane's dream. She comes into the room after the blue box drops on the floor and may be there to separate the opening of the blue box from the ending of the dream and so emphasize their distinction.
Apr 3, 2004 2:13 PM
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